ages 11-18

Meet the Notebook Girls

Meet Sophie, Courtney, Lindsey, and Julia, four teens that began a shared notebook that served as a joint diary during their freshman year at Manhattan’s Stuyvesant High School. Reproduced from the girls’ notebook with handwritten entries as well as photocopied snapshots, sketches, etc., The Notebook Girls reveals with raw honesty what it’s like to grow up female in today’s world. A fascinating nonfiction read.

Catch an interview with three of the notebook girls (now college freshmen) as they talk about how their diary became a book.

Calling All Manga Fans

It is nearing that time of year again where we at the library are thinking about programming for the fall.

Okay I have a few questions for you:
Did you like that the Animanga Club met on a Saturday?
Is a weekend meeting best for during the school year?
What anime/manga do you want to see/discuss at Animanga Club?
Did you like DDR at the meeting?

I know summer just started and you all are thinking about going on vacation and which prize you want to win in the summer reading game, but let me know what you think.
P.S. Who has a great trip planned for this summer?

Can your Tuba do this?

Flaming Tuba

David Silverman, director of the Simpsons, has created a sousaphone that spurts flames when you play it. Video

I wonder what Mr. Leach would say...
Via BoingBoing

Stay strong and tone up for the Summer!

Michigan Football

Don't miss out, this Saturday, June 24 at the Downtown Library, Multi-Purpose Room for Grades 6-8, there will be U of M athletes and local fitness experts to answer your questions about training and fitness. A fitness trainer from the Ann Arbor Y, the Chelsea Health and Fitness Center, a Jazzercise demo, and the U of M athletes round out our experts.

Just in time for summer

It was 31 years ago on June 20, 1975, that the movie Jaws was released. With its tagline, "Don't go into the water," Steven Spielberg's thrilling and terrifying movie put fear into the hearts of swimmers for years to come. The movie, based on the book by Peter Benchley, used great special effects to show attacks by a great white shark on beach goers in New England. It won three Oscars and was a huge success at the box office.

To allay (or increase) your fears about these beasts, learn more about sharks in the recently published Sharks of the World by Leonard Compagno, which one reviewer on Amazon excitedly describes as "...the DEFINITIVE and COMPLETELY...EXHAUSTIVE shark guide."

Beach Reads 2006 (#2)

beachreading11

School’s out. Grab these and head out for some fun and a little sun. Remember to sign up for the Summer Reading program.

The Attack by Yasmina Khadra. A Tel Aviv surgeon’s life is turned upside down by his link to a suicide bomber. Intense and timely.

Eye Contact by Cammie McGovern. Autistic Adam is the only witness and the prime suspect in another child’s murder. A gripping literary thriller.

The Mangler of Malibu Canyon by Jennifer Colt. Second crime-solving romp by the sleuthing McAfee twins on their pink Harley – this time involving a headless corpse in Aunt Reba’s Malibu digs. Wildly entertaining.

The Piano Man by Marcia Preston. A grieving mother tries to save the talented musician who received her son's transplanted heart. Compelling and graceful.

Proven Guilty by Jim Butcher. Modern crime fantasy series set in Chicago where wizards battle black magic to protect the mortal population. A TV pilot is expected to air this summer.

Restoring Grace by Katie Fforde. A sparkling, breezy read about an old crumbling mansion, three women in need of a home, and finding much more in the end. (Her previous titles are just as delightful).

Revenge of the Kudzu Debutantes by Cathy Holton. Three Georgian beauties exact revenge from straying spouses with aplomb and style. The Ya Ya Sisterhood meets the First Wives Club!

Slipstream by Leslie Larson, Drama, romance, and misfortune entangle the desperate souls working at LAX. Rich and seriously frightening.

Hounds of the Morrigan

You want so much celtic mythology that it will seep out your pores? You want drippingly lush language? You want quests steeped in magic so strange and beautifully mad that it could only be Irish folktale? You want cackling witches that ride motorcycles and can scare a shark by showing their true faces? You want unfortunate frogs given guard post duty? Mazes made from fingerprints? Talking earwigs that think they are Napoleon?

Of course you do. Read The Hounds of the Morrigan by Pat O'Shea.
This book has been out for a while, but I just had to mention it as it is one of my favorites, and I was reminded of it again recently...A good read for the summer for teens or adults.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts # 26

As a rule I don’t get particularly excited over debut novels by Hollywood insiders. However, the cover blurb intrigued me. Literacy and Longing in L.A. is about a book junkie.

When other thirty-something L.A. socialites with failed marriages and time on their hands shop, yoga and lunch, (Eu)Dora book binges, albeit in style - with $50 bubble baths, Coltrane, a steady supply of red wine and a doorman who shops and delivers.

Despite being a bit of a literary snob, Dora is sexy, smart, and likable, with a healthy dose of insecurity and a strong sense of family. She is open (to historical romance and the hunky clerk in a bookstore) and generous (I will let you find out).

The Chick Lit. ending won’t surprise you. Not brain surgery for sure, but what a fun read! And keep your eyes out for the very funny book quotes.

Teens needed for Community Mapping Project

Map Ann Arbor

Like to make a little money this summer? You could be a youthmapper with the countywide Community YouthMapping Project. Teens ages 14-18 canvass the county in search of places to go and things to do that are available for youth. YouthMappers will be paid and will gain knowledge of local geography and marketable skills such as interviewing, data collection/entry, problem-solving and much more!

Applications are available now! Contact Chana Hawkins at (734) 222-3936 or hawki125@msu.edu; Debi Samuels at (734) 487-6570 or dsamuels@emich.edu; or
Angelina Hamilton Broderick at (734)487-6570 or angelina.hamilton@emich.edu.

How It All Started

On June 14, 1951, Univac 1 was unveiled in Philadelphia. Designed for the Bureau of the Census, this was the first commercial electronic computer although it had been preceded by ENIAC, both systems developed by John Mauchy and others at the University of Pennsylvania. Massive in size and short on memory compared to our gigabyte world, UNIVAC, as it was soon called, represented a tidal shift in technology whose repercussions have affected every aspect of life as we know it.

Two current and entertaining books on the history of computers are What the Dormouse Said-:How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry by John Markoff and Electronic Brains: Stories from the Dawn of the Computer Age by Mike Hally.

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