Witham's drugs


Witham's drugs

Prominent philosopher and educator John Dewey lived in the house on the southeast corner of Forest and South University when he chaired UM's philosophy department from 1889 to 1894. A block of stores including Witham's Drugs was built around it in 1929. In 1970 Witham's was replaced by Village Corners, known for its wine selections and counterculture atmosphere.

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Interior of Horace Wilgus' home, 1897


Interior of Horace Wilgus' home, 1897

Law Professor Horace Wilgus and his family spend a quiet evening at their home on North University in 1897.

Frame location: North side of South University on lawn extension just west of Washtenaw, facing south-southeast

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Apostles Club members, 1900


Apostles Club members, 1900

The Apostles Club, faculty bachelors who banded together in 1900, first rented a boarding house at 1218 South University, complete with resident landlady as cook. This gave them a position in society without the expense of running a house on a junior faculty salary. Members had great fun at meals around a single table. They hosted large formal dances and lavish "at home" parties. Their bylaws provided for "recreating." Their baseball teams played against such opponents as the "Henpecked Husbands."

Frame location: North side of South University on lawn extension just west of Washtenaw, facing south-southeast

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Detroit Observatory, 1858


Detroit Observatory, 1858

Completed in 1854 on a hill northeast of campus, the Detroit observatory demonstrated president Tappan's commitment to practical scientific education. Detroit businessmen, eager for an accurate timekeeping service, provided funding. director Franz Brunnow was UM's first ph.d. professor and became Tappan's son-in-law. the observatory, stripped of later additions and restored, with its two original telescopes, reopened as a museum in 1999.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

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President's House from Campus, 1870s


President's House from Campus, 1870s

One of the four faculty houses built in 1840 became the president's house when Henry P. Tappan arrived in 1852. It is the only surviving original campus building. the third floor and kitchen wing were added before 1871, when James B. Angell made indoor plumbing a requirement for accepting the presidency. the campus side included barns, an orchard, and a vegetable garden.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

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Medical Building


Medical Building

The medical school attracted many of the first women students.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

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Dr. Eliza Mosher, first Dean of Women


Dr. Eliza Mosher, first Dean of Women

Dr. Eliza Mosher, an 1875 graduate of the Medical School, was persuaded by President Angell to give up her private practice in 1896 to become the first Dean of Women. As Professor of Hygiene in the Literary department, she was also the University's first female faculty member.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

Collection info: McLaughlin p.95 Mosher's papers

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Mason Hall and South College, ca. 1860


Mason Hall and South College, ca. 1860

When classes began in 1841, Mason Hall (left) housed classrooms, a chapel, a library, a museum, and dormitory rooms. Two professors taught thirteen students Greek, Latin, mathematics, and rhetoric. South College (right), a second classroom-dormitory block, was added in 1849. Henry P. Tappan, UM's first president (1852-1863), envisioned a great university that would make Ann Arbor "a new Athens." An early advocate of scientific research and the practical use of knowledge, he added an observatory, a chemical laboratory, and a law building. Affirming UM's nonsectarian nature, he recruited intellectually distinguished young men to join the existing faculty of Protestant clergymen. He ridiculed providing "vast dormitories for the night's sleep, instead of creating libraries and laboratories for the day's work." After 1858 students lived in rooming houses. Briefly, after the Civil War, UM was the nation's largest university with 32 professors and more than 1,200 students, over half in medicine and law. Tappan's vision was advanced by James B. Angell, who added over 30 buildings during his presidency (1871-1909). Latin and Greek were no longer required, seminar teaching was introduced, and laboratories and clinical teaching expanded. Colleges, schools, and departments evolved: Dentistry and Homeopathic Medicine 1875, Pharmacy 1876, Engineering 1895, and Forestry 1903. Angell staunchly supported coeducation. Foreign student enrollment rose, especially from China, after Angell's two years there as U.S. minister.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

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Group portrait of UM faculty, 1876


Group portrait of UM faculty, 1876

President James Burrill Angell (first row, third from right), who sought to make Michigan "part of the great world of scholars," with his distinguished faculty in 1876. To his immediate right sit Latin professor Henry Simmons Frieze, three time acting President and founder of the University Musical Society, and History professor Charles Kendall Adams, who introduced the seminar method.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

Collection info: OOH

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Female anatomy students at UM, 1880s


Female anatomy students at UM, 1880s

Female students in UM anatomy classes were still segregated in the 1880s. The admission of women was a major factor in University expansion. Regents initially rejected coeducation as "dangerous," and medical faculty called it "an experiment… not calculated to increase the modesty of women." UM became the nation's most prestigious large institution to admit women when Madelon Stockwell was allowed to enter the literary college in January 1870. That fall 33 more women enrolled, making up three percent of the student body, over half in the medical school. Though early coeds were subject to catcalls from male students and shunned by townspeople, by 1900 women were 22% of total enrollment.

Frame location: South side of North University, east end of the Diag, facing northeast toward Hill Auditorium

Collection info: DE p 36

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