The Campus Theater, 1957


The Campus Theater, 1957

Students and townsfolk in the early 1960s shared the fun of applauding or hissing during movies.

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library



First Hash Bash, 1971


First Hash Bash, 1971

The first Hash Bash brought thousands of young people to Diag on April Fool's Day 1971 to celebrate Ann Arbor's lenient penalties for smoking marijuana.

Frame location: North side of South University in plaza southeast of West Hall (Engineering Arch), facing southeast

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library



Art Fair, 1960


Art Fair, 1960

When local merchants began the Ann Arbor Art Fair in July 1960, South University catered to both townspeople and students. During 40 years of social and political change, the fair grew into a city-wide extravaganza. In the twentieth century, as fraternities, sororities, dormitories, and student rooms concentrated nearby, South University had become a focus of student activity. At this corner in the 1950s and 1960s you could have seen homecoming parades or panty raiders shouting "To the hill!" (women's dorms). The 1980s saw a basketball riot and the 1990s the Naked Mile. Political activities as well as pranks have always been a part of student life. Earlier students, fueled by alcohol, youth, and boredom, had torn up the town's wooden sidewalks for bonfires, disabled trolley cars, and shouted down presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan. They vigorously debated abolition, temperance, wars, and women's suffrage. During the Vietnam War, Ann Arbor became a center of the nationwide social and political firestorm. Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and peace teach-ins originated at UM. Those turbulent years began with civil rights picketing, intensified with antiwar protests, White Panthers, Black Action Movement (BAM) strikes, and demonstrations for women's liberation and gay rights. "Make love not war!"and "Power to the people!" affronted middle-class values and expressed the new rebellious spirit that led to hippies, the sexual revolution, and the Hash Bash.

Frame location: North side of South University in plaza southeast of West Hall (Engineering Arch), facing southeast

Collection info: Grace II p.54

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library



Couple on bikes at the Art Fair, 1971


Couple on bikes at the Art Fair, 1971

By the 1971 Art Fair, psychedelic rock, long hair, afros, and tie- dyed t-shirts had replaced the hit parade music, crew cuts, suits, ties, hats and gloves of the 1950s.

Frame location: North side of South University in plaza southeast of West Hall (Engineering Arch), facing southeast

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library



Apostles Club members, 1900


Apostles Club members, 1900

The Apostles Club, faculty bachelors who banded together in 1900, first rented a boarding house at 1218 South University, complete with resident landlady as cook. This gave them a position in society without the expense of running a house on a junior faculty salary. Members had great fun at meals around a single table. They hosted large formal dances and lavish "at home" parties. Their bylaws provided for "recreating." Their baseball teams played against such opponents as the "Henpecked Husbands."

Frame location: North side of South University on lawn extension just west of Washtenaw, facing south-southeast

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library



Fraternity brothers sit on pillars outside Phi Kappa Psi fraternity


Fraternity brothers sit on pillars outside Phi Kappa Psi fraternity

Phi Kappa Psi fraternity brothers perch on the pillars in front of their house at Hill and Washtenaw. Formerly Chauncy Millen's mansion.

Frame location: North side of South University on lawn extension just west of Washtenaw, facing south-southeast

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library



Students entertained in their rooming houses


Students entertained in their rooming houses

Students sometimes entertained in their rooming houses. "We often just talked, played cards, or made fudge in the chafing dish."

Frame location: North side of South University on lawn extension just west of Washtenaw, facing south-southeast

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library



Barbour & Waterman Gymnasiums, ca. 1900


Barbour & Waterman Gymnasiums, ca. 1900

The first organized campus sports were cricket in 1860 and baseball in 1863. for years students lobbied for permanent athletic facilities, claiming that a gymnasium would help reduce rowdyism. Waterman gymnasium for men (right) was completed in 1894 on the site of the original baseball diamond. Two years later Barbour gymnasium for women (left) was added with social rooms and an office for the new Dean of women, Dr. Eliza Mosher. Both gyms were demolished in 1977 and replaced by the Dow chemistry building in 1989.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library



President's House from Campus, 1870s


President's House from Campus, 1870s

Sarah Caswell Angell, the president's wife (standing at right), hosts the Browning society, late 1890s.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library



Barbour & Waterman Gymnasiums, ca. 1900


Barbour & Waterman Gymnasiums, ca. 1900

Students at the 1914 j-hop in Waterman gym formed the traditional block M.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library



Syndicate content