Ages 5-11

Play Connection for Children on the Autism Spectrum

If you are a parent with a child on the autism spectrum, here is an opportunity to explore the possibilities on Saturday, February 23 at 1:00 pm. Dr. Rick Solomon, from the Play Project, will be there to chat with parents and children. Kids will have an open space, or quiet space to play with construction toys, puppets and much more. Let the kids try out combinations of soothing scents with expert Michelle Krell Kydd, who recently interviewed
Temple Grandin about her sense of smell.

Here Come the Kerfuffles!

This is the first time we are hosting the Kerfuffles at the AADL and you are all invited to snap along, tap along, sing along to this jazzy A2/YPSI kid's band. We discovered Trent Collier strumming in the lovely Kerrytown garden one Farmer's Market Saturday morning and now we will get to hear Five Bananas and much more on Sunday, February 24 at 2 pm at Pittsfield!

Kamishibai-Japanese Story Telling

Learn about and experience Kamishibai Storytelling with Masanari Nohara of the Ann Arbor Japan House this Sunday, February 10th, 1:00-2:00 PM at the Traverwood Branch.

Kamishibai originated in Japanese Buddhist Temples in the 12th century, where monks used emakimono, or picture scrolls, to convey stories with moral lessons. In the 1930's the gaito kamishibai (street kamishibai) storytellers first made the scene, riding their bicycles to Japanese towns and villages with their paper drama stages.

Kamishibai storytelling involves a set of illustrated boards inserted into a small stage that, in Japan, was usually mounted on a bicycle and taken out one by one as a story is told. This program is co-sponsored by Ann Arbor Japan House. Ann Arbor Japan House was established with the goal to create a place where people would have opportunities to increase their familiarity with various aspects of Japanese language and culture. The event is for youth (grade K and up), teens, and adults.

Math & Mobiles

Sunday March 10, 2013 | 2:00 - 3:00 pm | Pittsfield Branch: Program Room | Grades K-5

Come have fun with shapes and build a colorful mobile featuring your favorite platonic solids! What's a platonic solid? Don't worry, we'll tell you all about it.

For Grades K-5.

Kid Bits - Picture Puzzles K-5

Picture Puzzles are lots of fun, and sometimes hard-to-find. Here is a way to find them. We have many many more than you think ....
so keep on "looking" below.....

Several authors are known to create picture puzzle books and we own many of their titles:
Lucy Micklethwait creates an I SPY series that challenges you to find things within classic art paintings.
Walter Wick takes readers on a journey through time to find things in the CAN YOU SEE WHAT I SEE series.
Martin Handford has created the ever-popular WHERE'sWALDO books.
Susannah Leigh creates USBORNE YOUNG PUZZLE books.
Jean Marzollo creates books with a rhymed text that challenges you to find objects hidden in the photographs.

Here's a public list on the Library website of "Picture Puzzles K-5" with more titles to "puzzle over".

Yay for Puzzles !!

PreK Bits - Inuit and Igloo and the Arctic Circle

Ms. Rachel and Ms. Rebecca performed Inuit Stories in Preschool Storytime this week. The featured stories were Kumak's Fish and "A Whale Of A Tale" from folkloric oral tradition.

Here are more title to take a look at:
Kumak's House - a fun tale that includes detailed illustrations of inuit lifestyle, and family.
Mama, Do You Love Me? - a universal rhyme of love, with lovely illustrations of an Inuit family in the Arctic tundra setting.
Immi's Gift - Immi fishes every day with her family, and each day she pulls up something colorful and different...
Over In The Arctic Where The Cold Wind Blows

... And if you like to learn about Inuit life, Arctic animals, and how Igloos are built ... take a look at these titles for children:
Look Inside An Igloo
Building An Igloo
Arctic
Best Book Of Polar Animals
Polar Lands
Snow Baby: the arctic childhood of Admiral Robert E. Peary's daring daughter

Remember! Only watch polar bears from aFAR !

ALA Announces 2013 Newbery, Caldecott, and other Youth Media Awards


Every year at the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting, librarians from across the continent gather for the most exciting event on the youth fiction calendar--the announcement of the ALA Youth Media Awards. These awards, from the venerable Newbery medal to the relatively new Stonewall Book Award, are awarded to what can only be termed the rockstars of the youth media world, and the enthusiasm surrounding the event carries out this comparison. Books nominated for these prizes are enshrined in their own sections of libraries, assigned in schools, and treasured by decades of readers, young and old. The 2013 winners were announced this morning in Seattle, Washington.

The 2013 Newbery Medal for the most outstanding children's literature of the year was awarded to Katherine Applegate for her book The One and Only Ivan.

The Caldecott Medal, celebrating its 75th year of honoring the best of the best of children's picture books, was awarded to Jon Klassen for This Is Not My Hat.

The Coretta Scott King Book Award for an outstanding publication that represents the African American experience was given to illustrator Bryan Collier for I, Too, Am America and author Andrea Davis Pinkney for Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America while The Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement recognized Demetria Tucker, librarian and youth media advocate, for her longstanding contributions.

The Pura Belpré Awards for works that best represent the Latino experience honored Martín de Porres: The Rose in the Desert for David Diaz's illustrations, and Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz for text.

The Michael L. Printz Award for the best book written for young adults was awarded to Nick Lake for In Darkness.

The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for a lifelong contribution to children's literature in the United States was awarded to Katherine Paterson, author of Bridge to Terabithia and many other beloved books, and The Margaret A. Edwards Award for contribution to teen literature went to Tamora Pierce for her quartets The Song of the Lioness and Protector of the Small.

For a full list of winners and honorable mentions, visit the American Library Association's awards page or the ALA Youth Media Awards Facebook page, and be sure to check out our section of award winning children's books in the Downtown Library youth room.

KinderConcert this Friday!

The littlest ones will love this celebration of the most well known instrument in the orchestra, the violin. Join Barbara Sturgis-Everett, Principal Second Violinist in the A2SO, pianist Kathryn Goodson, and child movement specialist Gari Stein to dance, sing, listen and learn this Friday, January 25 at 9:30 and 10:30 am!

An Audiobook for Young Harry Potter Fans

Fans of J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series and especially fans of the audiobooks narrated by Jim Dale may be interested to learn about The Worst Witch audiobook by Jill Murphy.

Like the Harry Potter series, The Worst Witch takes place at a school for young witches (though no young wizards here), complete with broomstick lessons, potion tests and uniforms with house colors. At Miss Cackle's Academy, we meet Mildred Hubble, dubbed the worst witch at the school because of her talent for getting into trouble. What kind of trouble? How about turning a rude classmate into a pig! (She meant to turn her into a toad, you see.) It's a short but magical story -- and very funny too.

Oh, yes, and did I mention that it's narrated by Miriam Margoyles, whom you may remember as Professor Sprout in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets?

The audiobook series continues with The Worst Witch Strikes Again and The Worst Witch All at Sea.

Let's Party with Gemini!

Let’s celebrate with my dear friends, the awesome Gemini, on Sunday, January 13 at 2 pm at the Downtown Library with music and stories galore! I knew the first time I met these talented twin boys, when we were just young punks, that they would bring harmony to A2 on so many levels. Even when I moved far away to Boston, my family danced to the Deli song before we had ever tasted a Zingerman’s Gemini sandwich and my daughter convinced us to get a dog by singing the Puppy Love song until we had to give in! See you there this Sunday!

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