Summer Food Service Programs for Children

Summer Food Service Programs for ChildrenSummer Food Service Programs for ChildrenDo you or someone you know have concerns about how your kids will stay well fed throughout the summer months? One in every six households with children in Washtenaw county face varying levels of food insecurity, a concern that only worsens when school is let out. The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) was created to ensure that children in lower-income areas could continue to receive nutritious meals during long school vacations, when they do not have access to the National School Lunch or School Breakfast Programs.

Food Gatherers will be sponsoring the 2014 SFSP's in Washtenaw county by providing free meals to children under 18, or persons up to age 26 that are enrolled in an educational program for the mentally or physically disabled. You can find the site listings here; please note that some sites do have participation requirements. If you have any questions, contact Food Gatherers at (734) 761-2796.

Small Business Support for You

Small Business Support for YouSmall Business Support for YouStarting a new business for the first time can be daunting. There are so many things to learn which have nothing to do with the product or service you will be selling. Luckily, we have thought of all of the potential questions you may have, and compiled a list of resources to help you relax a bit when it comes to organizing your new business.

The AADL Small Business and Entrepreneur Resources page has links for help with every step of the way in setting up a small business. There are resources for finding a mentor, and a list of organizations that can help you get started. You will find information on the difference between a for-profit verses a non-profit business model, and links to check the availability of potential business names in Washtenaw County.

If your business includes packaging food, we have a link to the MSU Product Center who specializes in working with small businesses and helping them package their products. Many of their clients have gone on to win awards for their innovative packaging.

Also included is a list of U.S. government important links about tax laws and IRS information.

Finally, once you get all of the preliminary groundwork out of the way and well on your way to getting your business off the ground, visit our site again. Once you start to meet with clients, or you need to hold meetings, don't forget AADL has rooms available for rent. If you need an ongoing space, in our resource list, we also have local options for shared office spaces.

From Obstacles to Opportunities

The Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living invites you to an event for International Coaching Week- From Obstacles to Opportunities! Coaching for Improved Employment Outcomes: Using your strengths as building blocks for your best self. The event will be on Wednesday, May 21, from 10 am – 12 pm at the Ann Arbor CIL. Geraldine Markel, Ph.D. will speak about managing your mind for learning and performance and there will be mini-speed coaching sessions by career and abilities coaches from around the community. RSVP and request accommodations at: careerservices@aacil.org or (734) 971-0277 x 27.

Let Your Library Help You Find Your Dream Job

GraduationGraduationGraduation is an exciting time in life. But, if you don't have a job lined up, it can to lead to frustration and make you yearn for your homework days. The competition can be fierce, with employers having so many candidates for so few positions, job-seekers really need to know how to market their skill-set. That's where AADL can help!

The AADL Job Search Toolkit is at your service with whatever job seeking questions you may have. There are articles on how to write resumes and cover letters - there is even a link to a resume grader that lets you know how your resume stacks up to others' in your field.

You can also find articles on where to find job postings, salary calculators, common interview questions, negotiating salary and other valuable information.

Visit AADL virtually, or person, and jump-start your career today.
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Young Actors Guild: Macbeth

The Ann Arbor Young Actors Guild is gearing up for its presentation of Macbeth May 16-18 at the U-M Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. In this classic play by William Shakespeare, an 11th century Scottish nobleman is led by an evil prophecy and his ruthless wife to the treasonous act that makes him king Ticket information is here.

Young People's Theater: The Wizard of Oz

Young People's Theater will present the classic story of The Wizard of Oz from May 16-18 at the University of Michigan Power Center. For ticket information, click here. Meanwhile, YPT also is organizing summer camps which you can learn about here.

Ann Arbor Civic Theater: Noises Off

Ann Arbor Civic Theater will present Noises Off May 8-11. From the synopsis on the A2ct web page: "Noises Off finds a dysfunctional theater troupe mounting a classic farce entitled Nothing On. This comedy-within-a-comedy offers the audience a glimpse behind the scenes during dress rehearsal, the opening performance, and a performance toward the end of the run." Ticket information is here.

WCC Information Technology Career Fair

Washtenaw Community College is holding an Information Technology Career Fair for WCC students, alumni, and community members. The fair will be on May 22 from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm in the Morris Lawrence Building. About 30 employers will be there looking for IT professionals to join their team. To register, follow this link. Bring copies of your resume, and dress to impress!

Need help writing your resume? Take a look at the AADL's collection of books that can do just that!

Global Accessibility Awareness Day

May 15th is Global Accessibility Awareness Day!

Stemming from a seemingly innocuous blog post in 2011 by a Los Angeles based web developer, Global Accessibility Awareness Day is now an international event with efforts to draw attention to digital accessibility, or lack there of. Challenge yourself any time at a computer by changing your digital habits: go mouse-less for an hour and use only key strokes to navigate your favorite website, or try re-sizing the text on your browser to 200% and check for any losses in content or functionality. You can also learn more about joining an in-person international or local event.

And don't forget about resources and assistive technology offered through the Washtenaw Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped at AADL, and the large print books available for check-out in the catalog!

Child in a Strange Country: Exhibit and Events


The traveling exhibit from the Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind, "Child in a Strange Country: Helen Keller and the History of Education for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired" officially opens this Friday, May 2, with a reception featuring library director Josie Parker, Museum Director Micheal A. Hudson, harpist Deborah Gabrion, and refreshments.

But the exhibit is already assembled enough (in the Downtown Library's lobby and 3rd floor) to see it will be fun and informative featuring a big globe with raised features, selections of writing such as Valentin Hauy’s tactile book and Louis Braille’s dot code, and insights, events, and photographs from Helen's life.

The title of the exhibit comes from Anne Sullivan's report about Helen in which she said, “For the first two years of her intellectual life she was like a child in a strange country,” and noted that no learning was possible until she could overcome the communication barrier posed by blindness and deafness. With that in mind, “Child in a Strange Country” explores four primary subjects: Reading, Science, Math, and Geography. Using Helen Keller’s educational journey as a lens, the exhibit uses tactile reproductions and authentic artifacts to uncover the roots of modern education for children with vision loss. The exhibit is designed to be fully accessible and interactive. You can touch and explore that big globe as much as you want.

If the exhibit whets your appetite, come see Child in a Strange Country or Why is Helen Keller at the Water Pump the Only Person Who Was Blind that Most Americans Know?, on Sunday, May 4 from 2 - 3:30 PM, a talk by Museum Director Micheal A. Hudson in which he explores major advances in learning and literacy since 1784 for people who are blind or visually impaired, introducing characters that most people do not know. Also join us on Wednesday, May 7 from 7 - 8:30 PM for Sensory Communication: Relaying and Receiving Information Through Touch, in which UM Performing Arts Technology Professor Sile O'Modhrain discusses touch, communication, and Helen Keller.

You may also be interested in Visions 2014 in the Morris Lawrence Building at Washtenaw Community College on Wednesday, May 14 from 10 AM - 3 PM, where a variety of exhibitors demonstrate the latest products and services for people with vision loss. The fair also features presentations by guest speakers from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Disabled, UM Kellogg Eye Center, WLBPD @ AADL, and the AT Guys.

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