Check out our new local history blog

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The Library's new Local History page now features a local history blog with contributions by local historians. Here you can discover (and comment upon) interesting facts about Tree Town, stumble across obscure bits of local lore, and learn about events, organizations, and collections relating to Ann Arbor history.

Mentoring kids in need

Need help getting through to your teenagers? A mentor for your child may be just the answer. Mentors along with parents can provide support, answers and influence over kids. Consider reading A Fine Young Man: What Parents, Mentors, and Educators Can Do To Shape Adolescent Boys Into Exceptional Men by Michael Gurian for a better understanding of the mentoring process. If you are looking for a mentor or would like to become a mentor yourself, contact The Insite Project or the Washtenaw Youth Mentoring Coalition, an alliance of twenty mentoring and youth focused organizations.

Summer Parenting Classes

Five different parenting classes are being offered in Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti this summer by the MSU Extension Family Consumer Science Programs. The Ann Arbor District Library and Ypsilanti District Library have large collections of books and DVDs on parenting, along with books to read and songs to sing to children, beginning before birth and for many years after.

Welcome to the Michigan Talent Bank

Michigan Talent Bank

Click here to access employment resources, opportunities and services in Michigan.

The Myths of Domestic Violence

Domestic violence isn't limited to physical abuse or to women. It takes many forms. The library offers books on the subject and has links on the AADL Favorite Sites to community sources of help such as Huron Valley Community Services. From there you can link to local agencies like SafeHouse Center for information and support. Check out these resources and become more fully aware.

Downtown Historical Street Exhibit On-line

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Are you a local history buff or simply interested in Ann Arbor's early days? Check out the on-line tour of permanent sidewalk exhibits located at sixteen landmark sites in our city. Locate the actual street exhibits by using a map provided on the site. You'll find the on-line tour and a look into the past at http://www.aadl.org/aastreets.

Polish your school or job skills this summer

Summer is a good time to learn – and AADL has a great resource to help you: LearningExpressLibrary. This collection of interactive online practice tests and tutorials is designed to help students and adults pass academic and licensing tests. Categories include Advanced Placement, Math Skills, Reading Skills, Writing Skills, and SAT Preparation.

Large Group Study Rooms Available Downtown

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Looking for place to gather your book group, hold a study group or have a small committee meeting? Consider the Library! We have two study rooms on the second floor of the Downtown Library that hold eight to ten people. Each has tables on which to spread out your papers and a door to close, keeping your conversations private. We also have study rooms at our Malletts Creek and Pittsfield Branches, which hold two, three or even four people if you don't require that much space. All of them are available on a first-come first-served basis and all of them are free!

aadlfreespace is free!

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Looking for a place to have a small meeting and can't afford to rent a room? Check out the aadlfreespace on the 3rd floor of the Downtown Library. It holds up to 32 people. You can reserve this room for meetings for free up to four times in a calendar year and make your reservations on line. Reservations must be made at least two weeks in advance. You will need an AADL library card to make the reservation. Date availability is shown as well on line. Can't get to a computer? Call 734-327-8323 to make your reservation.

Library Songsters

In the spirit of the 1950s folk music revival, the AADL Library Songsters program brings folk musicians, storytellers and dancers into our public schools to teach these traditional arts to students. This year Banjo Betsy Beckerman taught fourth graders at Angell and Pattengill how to write Michigan history songs; Glen Morningstar Jr. brought "Dancing Through American History" to Burns Park, and Lee Knight showed storytelling to sixth graders at Slauson. At the end of each three-day residency, students came to the library to perform their creations for each other or parents. They had a good time learning history, and some go to hear live folk music at places like The Ark or Crazy Wisdom Tea Room. AADL has a excellent collection of folk music recordings, histories and songbooks.

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