What We Can Forgive
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In response to pkooger's review, I agree that there are certain elements of late 1950s - early 1960s film making that we can forgive or overlook if the story is still great, the acting superb, or the writing as sharp and effective as when it was released. I'm not saying Breakfast at Tiffany's has all of these things -- in fact the writing falls down in a few places -- but I'll still watch it to follow Audrey Hepburn around the sentimental NYC invented in this film, and I'll still laugh at the party socialites and their inane banter. The fictional NYC in this movie is probably the reason I still want to watch the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade and the New Year's Eve ball drop. The city seems magical. So I still love seeing Audrey sing Moon River on the fire escape even if it isn't her singing. She's simply mesmerizing in this film.

But Rooney's portrayal of the Chinese landlord is unforgivable. This film is not a commentary on immigration, on racism, or on ownership in a city. And Rooney is not being funny (even though he must be trying). This is a comedy-drama that serves best as a vehicle for Audrey Hepburn to be as glamorous and as intriguing as she has ever been on screen.