Year of Yes
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Year of Yes is television writer Shonda Rhimes' account of her transformation from a reclusive, fearful life to a life of joy and 'freedom'. She chronicles the events in her life after she decided to say 'yes' to anything that would have previously been too intimidating or frightening.

This was an enjoyable book to read, once you got past the idiosyncratic grammar. However, maybe because this was the second memoir in a row that I read by a less-than-inspiring person, it became less enjoyable the farther I got in to it. At first, the book was inspiring: as an introvert, with fairly conservative tendencies, my first response to nearly everything is 'no.' For a while, it was a good reminder to push myself past my comfort zone, as they say. But then I got kind of annoyed with Rhimes: it's one thing to have a high opinion of yourself, but it's another to let everyone know that you do. I value the virtue of humility more than most people do, and am annoyed when others don't. Rhimes definitely failed in that regard. Perhaps the real reason, in the end, that I disliked the book is that her "Year of Yes" was nothing more than a series of 'yesses' to herself, rather than to others. While I firmly believe in the value of being the best possible version of yourself - which often entails they type of 'yesses' that Rhimes made - the whole purpose of becoming a better person is to know, love and serve God in this world. Improving yourself is meaningless if not in the context of serving God and others. Without this, Rhimes' transformation - while good in itself - loses much of its impact.