Reviews by patrice
Must-Have Crochet
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This book pretty much took the granny out of granny square. There are more motifs than you could probably get to in a lifetime of casual crafting. The instructions and diagrams are really helpful/well written. The color combinations are bright, bold and modern (something famously lacking in most crochet pattern books). You are inspired to grab your hook knowing it'll look great, rather than creating 3-4 different swatches with fingers crossed that the pattern CAN look up-to-date with different colors.
4 stars
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This book is an endless source of information! It's basically back to back pages of Companies, government agencies, and non-profits overseas, their information, the work they do, and how it is suited for someone with XYZ qualifications. It isn't a great "read," but it's a good reference resource that would be nice to have around for long-term research. The information is mostly suited for college students looking to get jobs overseas and how best to find them. However, it isn't entirely useless for adults in various industries.
3.5 stars
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" started out strong- there were plenty of laugh out loud moments, but dragged for the last 100 pages. there's no real development of plot later in the book. Things just happen, and when the author SAYS he's gong to explain, he never does. turns out, t ...more started out strong- there were plenty of laugh out loud moments, but dragged for the last 100 pages. there's no real development of plot later in the book. Things just happen, and when the author SAYS he's gong to explain, he never does. turns out, the novel has all of the pitfalls of poor storyline development that the "fake" novel did. It gets three stars because I love how Hely tears apart the current state of fiction. It'd be four if he kept a consistent pace.
3.5 stars
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Still Life with Husband is Lauren Fox's first novel and it's better than the average "Chick Lit." The protagonist, Emily, is a 30 something writer living in the midwest. She's married to a well-meaning sweet man, Kevin, who is on an intense campaign to "take the next step" (and by "next step" he means begging, guilting, and patronizing his wife into having children and moving to the suburbs). Boredom and complete disinterest in 'burb living and family planning become Emily's motivations for having an affair. While it is not the most original plot line, Fox's writing is really the star of the show. The narrative flows nicely, and the protagonist is intelligent, reflective, and doesn't seek pity from the reader. Her characters are believable and multidimensional, and more realistic than the generic cast you find in Chick Lit. No one becomes famous (by falling in love for a rich man) or lusts after Manolos. It's a breath of fresh air for an otherwise stale genre.
Laurie NOtaro
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Laurie Notaro's second book, Autobiography of a fat bride : true tales of a pretend adulthood, is a collection of anecdotes and essays that detail her life leading up to her wedding and the first years of her marriage. There are a few laugh-out-loud moments, but, like most contemporary "chick-lit," it falls flat. At times, the author is trying too hard to be funny, and her self-deprecation is tense and uncomfortable at best. Notaro, for most of the book, frames herself as the anti-bride or the anti-wife not fit for marriage or wifedom, but fails create an identity of what she is, and how her identity stands alone from what she is not. It became a difficult read when it was clear that Notaro did not plan on constructing any 'saving graces' of her self as a character, and did not write herself without constantly pointing out what she lacks and how she does not fit in to traditional roles.