Reviews by seadocks
to the point
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I really enjoyed this book. I liked that there was plenty of information in it, without really long chapters that seem to go on forever like other food action books. This one was to the point and kept the topics digestible in quick readable sections. Perfect for those that want instant info with out a lot of work (or those with ADHD).
Lots of information
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This lecture DVD set was full of great and useful information. While the knowledge of the speaker was vast, his ability to read from a prompter and move naturally in front of the camera was not very good. At times it was easier to just listen to the lectures than to actually watch them, so I suggest if you have trouble watching speakers with weird mannerisms or get frustrated with odd hitches in speech, then turn off the tv and just listen to the dvds on your surround sound system, although you will miss some of the nice pictures and graphs and what not. I would say that based on the amount of information in the set it is worth the check out, I learned a crap ton of stuff I had no knowledge of and enjoyed the set.
A Great Peak into History
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I really like the books in this series. This goes well with the book that features the north. Together you can get an idea of the differences in the cuisines between the two areas of the country. While this doesn't explain the civil war itself, it does show other ways there were differences between the groups at conflict with each other. The companion books are a must for anyone that finds this book and its sister book remotely interesting. The companion books are just short 30 page books of recipes that have been changed so that they can be made in a modern kitchen and they are a good way to create an interactive educational experience for your kids if you want to have them study the civil war period in history.
Changing views
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I requested this and my son read it before I did and then he proceeded to tell me about it for like three days straight. He basically used this book to justify increasing his allotment of daily screen time. While I normally limit the amount of time my kids are on screens this book made me rethink the way I was viewing the use of screens and video game entertainment. I was looking at things from my own history of gaming as entertainment and escape and not from the viewpoint of learning about organization, planning, math, and thinking critically. This book has actually been great because it has led to some very constructive conversations between my children and I about what is being learned from the games they play and how different they are now from 30 years ago. A good introduction to the changing ways video games are impacting our lives, whether we want them to or not.
Quick and informative
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This book is written in a style that makes it easy to read in just a few days. All of the information that is being presented is easily digestible and there are enough sources cited to dig deeper if one wishes. I really enjoyed this overview of the history of pork and pigs and it has changed the way I see the meat I eat. It is a good first step in having a better understanding of the animal protein that one consumes and how a person can relate to the food on their table. I also like the fact that it motivates you to look deeper into pork and explore areas of its production, preparation, and use that you normally might not even give a second thought to. Kind of goes hand with other recent published works on the history of pork and the pig farming industry.