Reviews by yugure
Cute
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Wonderfully illustrated with interesting page layouts and excellent use of lighting/solid black. Klassen knows his stuff (not surprising - check out I Want My Hat Back and This is Not My Hat) Story was unexpected and quirky, which is pretty spot-on for Lemony Snicket.
Quick and easy
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Like another reviewer said, these recipes are quick and delicious, and so many are easily made gluten-free. I made the Korean Cabbage Salad last night and it was pretty great - especially the homemade baked tofu part of it. Yum! Highly recommend buying beans in bulk and cooking them yourself, if you're looking for ways to eat cheaply. You can cook up a big batch and freeze whatever you don't need immediately. Another great recipe from this book is the Roasted Root Vegetable Salad. Takes a lot of time to make but it's delicious and looks gorgeous - quite impressive. I would definitely make it for having guests over.
Ho-hum
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I usually enjoy gender-bending stories but I was pretty bored by this one. So much time is spent on the preparation and lead up to Bet actually going to school, I felt like the real story didn't start until halfway through the book. None of the boys at school come off as real people, and this includes James, who we're supposed to care about because he's Bet's love interest. James felt like a fantasy boy, someone so perfect for Bet that he could only have come from the pen of the writer who created him. (Perhaps it is telling that I couldn't even remember his name while I was writing this review, and I had to look it up.) Bet has some substance to her character, as does Will and Will's granduncle, but everyone else is as flat as a pancake.
Nicely done
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A well-crafted, easy introduction for children to the lives of these three remarkable women. Not as detailed as an autobiography or even biography, of course, but hopefully young readers will have their interest piqued so they'll seek out more information. Loved the adorable, colorful artwork.
Meh
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I do not understand all the hype about this book. Sure, it's decently written, has some humor in it, and tries to paint a sympathetic and empathetic picture of living with cancer, so I understand why some people like it. But the people who treat it like it's the second coming of Christ? I don't get that. It's good, I guess, but nothing to write home about. While Green is technically proficient with his writing, I don't care for his style at all, and his characters seem to be nothing but witticisms on legs. Why does everyone in this book talk like everybody else, so clever and witty? Why can't there be a single unique voice among them? And I really, really disliked Gus and all his pretensions.