Reviews by Jen Chapin-Smith
Thursday Next
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Anyone who majored in English or literature will adore the "Thursday Next" series with its constant literary allusions. I highly recommend this series that makes lit geeks like myself feel smart.

The series is set in an alternate version of Swindon, England. In it, scientists have cloned and brought back to everyday life neanderthals, dodo birds, wooly mammoths and other creatures. People travel in dirigibles, rather than airplanes. Wales is a separate nation from England and cheese has become a black market commodity. The entire universe and series is highly entertaining. However, in "The Well of Lost Plots" the author begins to change the rules about how literary characters live and who they are. They stop being the characters themselves and become actors who play a role when someone is reading the novel.

In this book, Thursday Next is hiding in an unpublished novel from the Big Brother-like Goliath Corporation. Goliath runs everything, is angry at Thursday for foiling their evil plans in the last book, so they eradicate Thursday's husband from the timeline as if he never existed.

Fforde's rule change is necessary for the plot line of "The Well of Lost Plots," but it takes away from the sense of magical realism of the previous two novels.

Nonetheless, I find the "Thursday Next" series enjoyable and read every one.
Thursday Next
»
Anyone who majored in English or literature will adore the "Thursday Next" series with its constant literary allusions. I highly recommend this series that makes lit geeks like myself feel smart.

The series is set in an alternate version England. In it, scientists have cloned and brought back to everyday life neanderthals, dodo birds, wooly mammoths and other creatures. People travel in dirigibles, rather than airplanes. Wales is a separate nation from England and cheese has become a black market commodity. The entire universe and series is highly entertaining.

Thursday Next is a Crimean War veteran (the war still rages on after more than 100 years) and literary detective who investigates crimes related to fiction. She is happily married to another veteran after rescuing him from an unhappy almost-marriage at the end of "The Eyre Affair," in a scene very reminiscent of "Jane Eyre." The two live happily in Swindon with their pet dodo.

Suddenly, Thursday's father, a member of the time-travelling ChronoGuard who are supposed to solve crimes related to the time line, appears to tell her that she must prevent the world from ending due to a pink sludge that her inventor uncle has created.

Meanwhile, Goliath Corporatation, which runs everything, is angry at Thursday for foiling their evil plans in the last book, so they eradicate Thursday's husband from the timeline as if he never existed.

Thursday has her hands full with problems to solve and several more books in which to do so.
Thursday Next
»
Anyone who majored in English or literature will adore the "Thursday Next" series with its constant literary allusions. I highly recommend this series that makes lit geeks like myself feel smart.

The series is set in an alternate version of Swindon, England. In it, scientists have cloned and brought back to everyday life neanderthals, dodo birds, wooly mammoths and other creatures. People travel in dirigibles, rather than airplanes. Wales is a separate nation from England and cheese has become a black market commodity. The entire universe and series is highly entertaining.

Thursday Next is a Crimean War veteran (the war still rages on after more than 100 years) and literary detective who investigates crimes related to fiction. Suddenly, Thursday's father, a member of the time-travelling ChronoGuard who are supposed to solve crimes related to the time line, appears to tell her that she must prevent the world from ending due to a pink sludge that her inventor uncle has created.

Goliath Corporatation, which runs everything, is angry at Thursday for foiling their evil plans in the last book, so they eradicate Thursday's husband from the timeline as if he never existed.

Thursday has her hands full with problems to solve and several more books in which to do so.
The Eyre Affair
»
"The Eyre Affair" is the first and best known of Jasper Fforde's many novels and the start of the "Thursday Next" series. I highly recommend them all as a fun read even if Fforde is inconsistent with the rules of how magic works in this fictional universe.

The series is set in an alternate version of Swindon, England. In it, scientists have cloned and brought back to everyday life neanderthals, dodo birds, wooly mammoths and other creatures. People travel in dirigibles, rather than airplanes. Wales is a separate nation from England and cheese has become a black market commodity. The entire universe and series is highly entertaining.

Our protagonist, Thursday Next, is a Crimean War veteran (the war is still going on between England and Russia) and a literary detective who investigates crimes related to fiction novels. As a child she discovered she could fall into a book and then interact with the characters in their own landscape. This caused her to change a small plot device in "Jane Eyre," but critics of her world think it was for the best.

The police in the "real" world have hired Thursday to catch a serial killer who used to be her professor and tracks him to the text of "Jane Eyre," which she enters again, causing the novel's plot to change.

"The Eyre Affair" has a very long and twisting plot, but it is well worth reading. You will certainly need to read it in order to become acquainted with characters and plot devises that will show up throughout the series.
Eyre Affair
»
"The Eyre Affair" is the first and best known of Jasper Fforde's many novels and the start of the "Thursday Next" series. I highly recommend them all as a fun read even if Fforde is inconsistent with the rules of how magic works in this fictional universe.

Thursday Next is a Crimean War veteran (the war is still going on between England and Russia) and a literary detective who investigates crimes related to fiction novels. As a child she discovered she could fall into a book and then interact with the characters in their own landscape. This caused her to change a small plot device in "Jane Eyre," but critics of her world think it was for the best.

The police in the "real" world have hired Thursday to catch a serial killer who used to be her professor and tracks him to the text of "Jane Eyre," which she enters again, causing the novel's plot to change.

The series is set in an alternate version of Swindon, England. In it, scientists have cloned and brought back to everyday life neanderthals, dodo birds, wooly mammoths and other creatures. People travel in dirigibles, rather than airplanes. Wales is a separate nation from England and cheese has become a black market commodity. The entire universe and series is highly entertaining.