Reviews by Jen Chapin-Smith
Thursday Next
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The fourth in the "Thursday Next" detective series, "Something Rotten" picks up the adventures of its title character who has been hiding the Book World (as opposed to her own "real" world, an alternative version of England) from assassins. The Book World is where literary characters live.

The novel begins with Thursday working as the head of the literary police force Jurisfiction hunting the Minotaur who escaped in the previous "Thursday Next" book. The Big Brother-like Goliath Corporation has erased Thursday's husband's existence from time, but not her son, Friday, who is now 2.

The mother and son pair go to visit the grandmother in the "read" Swindon as Hamlet tags along (hence the book's title). Thursday get her old job back at SpecOps-27 as a Literary Detective but her old nemesis Yorrick Kaine is trying to kill her. To make matters worse, her friends from the Book World say the places is going to pieces without her leadership.

This series is great for geeks who love literature, especially those who majored in it or in English. The series has numerous allusions to literature. The "real" world of Thursday Next is also fun as a science fiction wonderland. Scientists there have cloned neanderthals, dodos and even wooly mammoths, who now freely roam the countryside. It's a fun series, although the quality diminishes with each installment.
Thursday Next
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Part of the "Thursday Next" detective series, "Something Rotten" picks up the adventures of its title character in the Book World (as opposed to her own "real" world, an alternative version of England).

The novel begins with Thursday working as the head of the literary police force Jurisfiction hunting the Minotaur who escaped in the previous "Thursday Next" book. The Big Brother-like Goliath Corporation has erased Thursday's husband's existence from time, but not her son, Friday, who is now 2.

The pair go to visit the grandmother in the "read" Swindon as Hamlet tags along (hence the book's title). Thursday get her old job back at SpecOps-27 as a Literary Detective but her old nemesis Yorrick Kaine is trying to kill her. To make matters worse, her friends from the Book World say the places is going to pieces without her leadership.

This series is great for geeks who love literature, especially those who majored in it or in English. The series has numerous allusions to literature. The "real" world of Thursday Next is also fun as a science fiction wonderland. Scientists there have cloned neanderthals, dodos and even wooly mammoths, who now freely roam the countryside. It's a fun series, although the quality diminishes with each installment.
Thursday Next
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In this sixth book in Jasper Fforde's "Thursday Next" series our title character has gone missing. Thursday has become quite famous in her world for having saved her nation from evil villains many time, so a novelist wrote a fictionalized books series about her, which has become wildly popular. As a result, there is now a Book World version of Thursday (remember that our protagonist can travel between her world and the Book World in which fictional characters live). The Book World Policing Agency call in the fictional version of Thursday to fill in as a detective while her counterpart is missing.

Because the "real" Thursday lives in a science fiction version of England, readers get to hear about scientists' cloning neanderthals, dodos and wooly mammoths, along with all the other interesting items that make Fforde's written universes so interesting.

Like many of the Thursday Next novels, this one has numerous references to literature, including Charles Dickens' novels. This is fun for those who majored in literature or English and like to feel good about their degrees.

The quality of the series deteriorates with each novel, yet I still enjoyed them and read the entire set.
Thursday Next
»
In this sixth book in Jasper Fforde's "Thursday Next" series our title character has gone missing. Thursday has become quite famous in her world for having saved her nation from evil villains many time, so a novelist wrote a fictionalized books series about her, which has become wildly popular. As a result, there is now a Book World version of Thursday (remember that our protagonist can travel between her world and the Book World in which fictional characters live). The Book World Policing Agency call in the fictional version of Thursday to fill in as a detective while her counterpart is missing.

Like many of the Thursday Next novels, this one has numerous references to literature, including Charles Dickens' novels. This is fun for those who majored in literature or English and like to feel good about their degrees.

The quality of the series deteriorates with each novel, yet I still enjoyed them and read the entire set.
Thursday Next
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The fifth in the "Thursday Next" series by Jasper Fforde, "First Among Sequels" adds a focus on Thursday's children that previous novels did not have.

Thursday and her husband now have three offspring. Their eldest, Friday, is supposed to enter the ChronoGuard (a special forces unit that polices the timeline) like his grandfather. They know this because someone from the future informed them. Her son is resisting, which is throwing the future into danger.

Meanwhile, Thursday is also encountering renegade apprentices, Big Brother-like corporations, and throuble from Cheese Enforcement Agency (cheese as become a highly valued black market commodity).

Thursday's world is somewhat parallel to our own: she lives in Swindon, England. Yet the technology there is quite different. People travel in dirigibles rather than airplanes. Wales is its own nation. Scientists have cloned neanderthals, dodos and wooly mammoths, who now migrant freely across England. Thursday is also secretly part of a police force investigating crimes in fiction, such as "real" world murderers who are hiding in novels or people trying to disrupt plot lines.

The quality of the series deteriorates with each novel, yet I still enjoyed them and read the entire set.