Reviews by sdunav
According to my 12 y.o. daughter...
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...this is really weird, but really good. The flip-comic on the outside of the pages is a nice touch.
Very Uneven & Sometimes Uncomfortable
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Interesting - people seem to either hate or love this book. The haters think Decker's a foul-mouthed, pathetic excuse for a wife and mother; the lovers think she's hilarious and raw and truthful about her sons' disabilities.

I'm actually right in the middle - I thought her humor was sometimes a bit forced, and her relationship with her dh is certainly not great but it didn't make me hate the book. I was, however, more than a little uncomfortable with some of the detail Decker gives about her sons' issues - especially her older son. Does she think her son's classmates won't hear about this book? How is he going to feel as an adult when people read about his grade-school aged obsession with checking his own butt for poop?

Still, it is an uncensored look at life with autism, and that is valuable when there's so much "inspiration porn"ish stuff out there.
Also Titled
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"Forsaken". Not sure why it was re-titled, because I really liked the original title more. Anyway, this was an enjoyable paranormal YA story, but a "deus ex machina" ending almost ruined it for me. The world-building (an alternate Atlanta in 2018) was excellent, the characters interesting, and the plot started out strong. I will check out the next one.
Also Titled
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Forbidden (and sometimes the author is listed as Jana G. Oliver) - makes it difficult to find these books in the right order!
Vulgar, Funny, Perceptive
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The first sentence is a grabber (and bit of a shocker): "In the past year, I masturbated exactly 468 times."

In actuality, this is a very sweet story about a 17 y.o. suffering from OCD. I think the first sentence probably puts some readers off (on goodreads, anyway), but if it makes more teenaged boys read it, I'm all for it. Karo does an excellent job channeling a teen boy (maybe because he isn't too far from it himself?) and the social agonies of high school. And then there's the problems of seeing a psychiatrist, trying cognitive behavioral therapy, and medication.