Click on the LearningExpress Library!

learningexpresslearningexpress

Did you know that you can access dozens of practice tests and 150 e-books by going to the LearningExpress Library from our Research Pages? Just click on the Research Tab and then the click on the link that says "Test Prep". LearningExpress Library is the sole item with that heading. You will need an additional log in to access this database to take practice tests. Believe me, it's worth having a look-see for Academic preparation, Civil Services exams, Skill Building for kids and adults and So MUCH MORE!!!

University of Michigan Press EBooks Now Available Through AADL

AADL has a new database of academic Ebooks from a publisher just down the street: the University of Michigan Press. Access the collection from our A-Z Database page or our Local Creators page. Browse or search over 500 titles published by the University of Michigan Press right in your browser.

The University of Michigan Press produces educational texts for student audiences, with special emphasis on English language teaching and political, social, and cultural issues. UM Press also produces regional books on fiction and the arts, human history, natural history, and the changing environment of Michigan and the Great Lakes.

Movin' On Back to City Hall

city hallcity hall

On Monday, June 27, the City of Ann Arbor Customer Service Center will be open for business at 8 a.m. in its new permanent location on the first floor of City Hall, located at 301 E. Huron Street.

Customer Service Center services include:
• Payment processing for water bills, parking tickets, property taxes, and solid waste;
• Routes city calls and requests and provides general city information to walk-in customers; and
• This unit also is responsible for water utility meter reading, installation, repair, billing, backflow prevention inspections and certifications.

The Customer Service Center phone number will not change, which is (734) 794-6320.

Heritage Quest: Benjamin Franklin as a Genealogist by John W. Jordan

Benjamin Franklin Family TreeBenjamin Franklin Family TreeIn 1899, John Woolf Jordan (historian and genealogy writer of the late 1800's and early 1900's) wrote an article for the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography titled, “Franklin as a Genealogist”. Mr. Jordan obtained original letters and records and wrote about Benjamin Franklin’s genealogical quest. Benjamin Franklin investigated his family line and created what Mr. Jordan referred to as a pedigree (a family tree, a portion of Benjamin Franklin's pedigree is displayed in the blog photo). You too can see the original documents (some in Benjamin Franklin’s own hand) using the Heritage Quest research database.

The Heritage Quest database (available @ AADL) has documents imaged from the 1790 - 1930 U.S. federal censuses and images from over 20,000 book titles, including family and local histories. To access the Heritage Quest database from home, simply login to your online library account. You can search census data, books and local histories, revolutionary war pension and bounty-land-warrant application files, Freedman's Bank documents, and Serial Set documents. I searched for books about Ann Arbor and found several, including: Polk's Ann Arbor City Directory,1915 and the Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti and Washtenaw County Directory, 1888-9.

Redistricting: A Discussion with Washtenaw County Clerk Larry Kestenbaum

Lawrence KestenbaumLawrence Kestenbaum

Following the US Census every ten years, new lines are drawn for congressional and legislative districts, county commission districts, and city council wards. We recently sat down with Washtenaw County Clerk Larry Kestenbaum, one of five members of the County Apportionment Commission to discuss the process of re-drawing the lines and the final plan that reduces the number of County Commission seats from 11 to 9. In this wide-ranging discussion Mr. Kestenbaum discusses the history of redistricting and politics in the county and the state as well as the likely scenarios for candidates in the newly combined commissioner districts. As many of you know, Mr. Kestenbaum also hosts one of the best (and funniest) political junkie websites out there, The Political Graveyard.

On Thursday, June 16th, 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm, at the Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room, the AADL will host a panel discussion, Redistricting: It Matters to All of Us that will include include Mr. Kestenbaum, Jacqueline Beaudry, Ann Arbor City Clerk; Rep. Jeff Irwin, State Representative, 53rd District and Rep. Mark Ouimet, State Representative, 52nd District.

Attachment Size
AADL_Talks_To-Lawrence_Kestenbaum.mp3 25.6 MB

Redistricting: New Lines, New Choices

mapmap

Following the US Census every ten years, new lines are drawn for congressional and legislative districts, county commission districts, and city council wards. Although the population numbers changed little in Washtenaw County, there were shifts in where we live in the county.

Join us for a panel discussion on Thursday June 16, 2011: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room , co-sponsored by The League of Women Voters of the Ann Arbor Area and The Kiwanis Club of Ann Arbor, and find out how your city, county and state are making these decisions and how it might affect you. Panelists include Jacqueline Beaudry, Ann Arbor City Clerk; Lawrence Kestenbaum, Washtenaw County Clerk; Rep. Jeff Irwin, State Representative, 53rd District and Rep. Mark Ouimet, State Representative, 52nd District.

Get a sneak preview into the discussion with our latest podcast episode, AADL Talks To: Lawrence Kestenbaum.

African American Downtown Festival & the history of African Americans in Ann Arbor

This Saturday, June 4th, will be the annual African American Downtown Festival in Ann Arbor! The festival will be a multicultural and multi-generational celebration of African American history in Ann Arbor. The location of the festival (4th and Ann) is significant due to it being the historical epicenter in Ann Arbor of African American owned businesses, culture and family life. Fun times to be had by all!

If you're interested in doing some research into the history of African Americans in Washtenaw County, the AADL has several resources for you:

Additional local resources include:

The Boston Bequest

Gift of MoneyGift of Money Let's continue the story of the Benjamin Franklin bequest to Philadelphia and Boston. One of the outcomes of the Boston bequest was the establishment of the Franklin Institute of Boston, which is known today as the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology. It's interesting to learn about American history. Read more about Benjamin Franklin and other famous Americans using the Biography and Genealogy Master Index. Like Russel Crowe, are you curious about local history? Check out the "The Making of Ann Arbor" or "Ypsilanti Gleanings".

The Philadelphia Bequest: Ben Franklin

Gift of MoneyGift of Money When Benjamin Franklin passed away on April 17, 1790, he left Boston and Philadelphia $2,000. He'd saved this money while he was Governor of Pennsylvania (1785 to 1788). The money was not to be distributed until 200 years after his death. In 1990, the bequest was worth $6.5 million and Philadelphia's portion of the trust was $2 million. There were several ideas about what should be done with the money: apply the money to government deficits, build low-income housing, gift the money to a university, or create scholarships for students who want to study a trade. After some debate, the money was shared between The Franklin Institute and several community foundations like the Williamsport-Lycoming Foundation that helps fund technical education scholarships. Although Benjamin Franklin left the decision of how to spend the money for the city, he suggested the money should "provide funds for young artificers". Are you interested in researching grants and foundations? The Ann Arbor District Library can help, just click here.

WISD Special Election Tuesday, May 3

ballotballot

The Washtenaw Intermediate School District Special Election to renew the Special Education Millage is coming up and all City Polling Places will be open from 7 a.m. until 8 p.m. on May 3, 2011 for this citywide election. There are a couple of polling locations construction issues to be aware of:

Voters at the Ann Arbor District Library Downtown Branch (Precinct 5-1) should be aware of construction activities currently restricting traffic on Fifth Avenue. The library/polling place remains open however, so please plan your route accordingly.

In addition, the Second Baptist Church (Precinct 5-3) is under construction. The parking lot at the main entrance of the Church located at 850 Red Oak Road and Wendy is not accessible. Voters need to enter the site using the rear driveway near Red Oak and Hermania.

Not sure if you're registered to vote and your exact polling location? Visit the Michigan Votes website. Don't forget to bring your voter ID to the polls.

Syndicate content