Sancho’s Scene: Community Events that Wander off the Path

Why pull out all the decorating stops when someone else has already done it for you? According to the Ann Arbor News, the Museum on Main Street is serving up nostalgia this holiday season—glass ornaments, aluminum trees, and even a tree made from goose feathers (!) fill the small house on the corner of Beakes and Main. The museum is open on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 1-4, and procrastinators need not fret—the exhibit runs until January 17. For the industrious at heart, the library also carries a large selection of holiday decorating books.

Make it a Michigan Holiday

Planning on getting a tree, wreath or roping this holiday season? The Michigan Department of Agriculture has tips for selecting and caring for Michigan-grown greenery. You can cut your own at a Michigan Christmas tree farm. To get in the holiday mood, visit the Michigan Historical Center. They’ve decked the halls with holiday trimmings and added special winter and holiday displays throughout the galleries. The kids can make decorations for your Michigan tree at the Center’s WinterFest Arts & Crafts Extravaganza this Saturday, Dec. 2nd.

Libros para celebrar el Dia de los Muertos

Dia de los Muertos (meaning "Day of the Dead") celebrations run from October 31 through November 2. Teach your child about this ancient Aztec holiday and celebrate the memory of your loved ones with these books from our youth collection:

Felipa and the Day of the Dead by Birte Müller
Beto and the Bone Dance by Gina Freschet
Clatter Bash!:a Day of the Dead Celebration by Richard Keep.
Calavera Abecedario : a Day of the Dead Alphabet Book by Jeanette Winter
Day of the Dead by Linda Lowery
The Skeleton at the Feast : the Day of the Dead in Mexico by Elizabeth Carmichael and Chloë Sayer.

Punxsutawney Phyllis

This adorable tale by Susanna Leonard Hill is all about a young groundhog named Phyllis and her desire to become the next Punxsutawney Phil, the famous groundhog who emerges every February 2nd to determine whether spring will arrive early or late. The only problem is, Phyllis is a girl and the tradition of foretelling the weather has always been passed down to the men in the family. Well, little Phyllis has her own ideas and great senses too. You'll have to read it to see if she gets her wish. This wonderfully illustrated picture book also includes a nifty summary of Groundhog Day and a brief history of Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania.

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