Fall Back: Daylight Saving Time Ends This Sunday, November 1

This coming Sunday, November 1, at 2:00 a.m. the time will become 1:00 a.m. and Daylight Saving Time will end. Everyone gets an extra hour of Halloween fun this year thanks to DST.

Under the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Daylight Saving Time, since 2007, begins on the second Sunday of March and ends the first Sunday in November. Before 2007, Daylight Saving Time had started on the first Sunday in April and ended on the last Sunday of October.

You can no longer call 665-1212 to hear “At the tone, the time will be…” but you can go to the Official U. S. Time to make sure you set your clocks correctly.

This website, plus a WebExhibits article on Daylight Saving Time, are among the websites listed in the Time, Calendar, and Holidays section of the AADL Select Sites (a guide to useful and interesting websites).

For more on Daylight Saving Time consult Seize the Daylight: the Curious and Contentious Story of Daylight Saving Time by David Prerau, published in 2005.

Forest Hill Cemetery Interpretive Tours

Founded in 1857, Forest Hill is Ann Arbor's oldest cemetery, rich in history and remarkably colorful this time of year. Indeed, it's a perfect time for an interpretive tour of the graveyard with local historian Wystan Stevens, who leads groups through the grounds with stories of Ann Arbor's history every Sunday from Oct. 4 - Nov. 8 starting at 2pm. Be sure to catch him this time around, for Stevens will end his popular 30 year tradition this year. The tours are $10 for adults and free for children, and they begin at the cemetery gate on Observatory, north of Geddes. Additional information is available at 734.662.5438. For a further glimpse into the lore of Michigan's past, try the books Ann Arbor Area Ghosts, and Ghost Towns of Michigan.

200 Years of Poe

The circumstances surrounding the exact nature of Edgar Allan Poe’s death still remain a mystery. The celebrated author was found wandering the streets of Baltimore confused, in a “pitiable condition,” and was taken to the hospital where he died four days later, at age 40. An also pitiable funeral was to follow, with a meager ten people in attendance and barely a footnote in the newspaper.

So it is only appropriate that this Sunday, October 11th, a funeral will be held in Baltimore, MD for the master of the macabre. 2009 marks the 200th anniversary of Poe’s birth in 1809, and the 160th anniversary of his death on October 7th, 1849. Along with the funeral services to come this weekend, an open casket “visitation” service was held yesterday at the Poe House - complete with a creepy lifelike replica of Poe’s corpse.

Actor John Astin - better known as “Gomez Addams” of the original Addams Family television show - will be serving as Master of Ceremonies for the special event on Sunday, which will begin with a police-escorted funeral procession and two “services” in the afternoon. If you can’t make it to Baltimore this weekend to pay your respects, be sure to honor Mr. Poe this October by checking out some of the many materials available at the library.

Happy (snowy) Valentine's Day!

It’s a kid’s dream come true—sunny day, lots of snow, no school… time to curl up with some hot chocolate and a few books or run outside for some serious sledding! As the day draws to a close and you’re searching for a snowbound activity, head over to the Pittsfield Branch for Puppy Love. Bring a 4x6 photo of your favorite furry (or fishy) friend and leave with an adorable frame. The fun starts at 4 pm!

Sancho’s Scene: Community Events that Wander off the Path

Why pull out all the decorating stops when someone else has already done it for you? According to the Ann Arbor News, the Museum on Main Street is serving up nostalgia this holiday season—glass ornaments, aluminum trees, and even a tree made from goose feathers (!) fill the small house on the corner of Beakes and Main. The museum is open on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 1-4, and procrastinators need not fret—the exhibit runs until January 17. For the industrious at heart, the library also carries a large selection of holiday decorating books.

Make it a Michigan Holiday

Planning on getting a tree, wreath or roping this holiday season? The Michigan Department of Agriculture has tips for selecting and caring for Michigan-grown greenery. You can cut your own at a Michigan Christmas tree farm. To get in the holiday mood, visit the Michigan Historical Center. They’ve decked the halls with holiday trimmings and added special winter and holiday displays throughout the galleries. The kids can make decorations for your Michigan tree at the Center’s WinterFest Arts & Crafts Extravaganza this Saturday, Dec. 2nd.

Libros para celebrar el Dia de los Muertos

Dia de los Muertos (meaning "Day of the Dead") celebrations run from October 31 through November 2. Teach your child about this ancient Aztec holiday and celebrate the memory of your loved ones with these books from our youth collection:

Felipa and the Day of the Dead by Birte Müller
Beto and the Bone Dance by Gina Freschet
Clatter Bash!:a Day of the Dead Celebration by Richard Keep.
Calavera Abecedario : a Day of the Dead Alphabet Book by Jeanette Winter
Day of the Dead by Linda Lowery
The Skeleton at the Feast : the Day of the Dead in Mexico by Elizabeth Carmichael and Chloë Sayer.

Punxsutawney Phyllis

This adorable tale by Susanna Leonard Hill is all about a young groundhog named Phyllis and her desire to become the next Punxsutawney Phil, the famous groundhog who emerges every February 2nd to determine whether spring will arrive early or late. The only problem is, Phyllis is a girl and the tradition of foretelling the weather has always been passed down to the men in the family. Well, little Phyllis has her own ideas and great senses too. You'll have to read it to see if she gets her wish. This wonderfully illustrated picture book also includes a nifty summary of Groundhog Day and a brief history of Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania.

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