Lurie Terrace Celebrates 50 Years

On a cold and windy October 9, 1964, a small group of speakers and community members gathered in front of the new senior citizen apartment high-rise, Lurie Terrace, to celebrate its completion. No one was more instrumental in bringing Lurie Terrace to completion than Shata Ling. Mrs. Ling founded the Ann Arbor Senior Citizens Guild in 1956 and worked tirelessly on behalf of seniors throughout her active career in Ann Arbor. Lurie Terrace was named in honor of Mrs. Ling's mother, Ann Przzan Lurie.

Lurie was one of the first affordable senior housing projects proposed in the U.S. In 1961 a site on W. Huron was selected and demolition of four homes began. Bricks from the Lorin Mills House were used to construct the patio at Lurie. Designed by local architect James H. Livingston the building featured twin Pentagon towers. The first resident to sign a lease at Lurie Terrace came from a family with a long history in Ann Arbor, Pearl McOmber.

From the beginning, Lurie Terrace emphasized a vibrant and varied lifestyle for seniors with a workshop, a plant conservatory, small dining halls, library, men's club, even an in-house "Newsboy".

Lurie was not without controversy and in February, 1982, three years after a woman was denied admission because she was handicapped, the Michigan Court of Appeals struck down Lurie's residency requirements that prohibited handicapped persons. Over the years, Lurie developed programs and social events that aimed at expanding horizons of all seniors in their community of apartments. Happy Birthday Lurie Terrace!

Tonight: Maximize Your Medicare

Jae Oh, author of Maximize Your Medicare, will discuss Medicare and its impact on the consumer. Learn what Medicare is, what to do with it, and how to save money when using it. Issues related to Medicare and the Affordable Care Act will be addressed. Books will be available for purchase following the program.

ABCs of Medicare | Jae W. Oh, MBA | Tuesday, July 9, 7-8:30 pm | Downtown Library

The Affordable Care Act: Evolution of Senior Health

The idea of Senior Health has evolved since the creation of Medicare in 1965. The passing of the Affordable Care Act has further changed health care for seniors. Part of the 2013 MLK symposium, this presentation will be held on Saturday, January 26, 2013 from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm at: the Turner Senior Resource Center. Jacquetta Hinton will be presenting and this free event includes lunch.

Caregiver Support

Interim HealthCare in partnership with Catholic Social Services, Blueprint for Aging, and The Best of Aging Magazine are hosting the First Annual National Family Caregivers Recognition Event on Sunday November 11, 2012 from 2:00-4:30pm at the Senior Health Building at 5361 McAuley Dr. on the campus of St. Joe's Hospital. Mary Ellen Geist, author of A Measure of the Heart: A Father’s Alzheimer’s, a Daughter’s Return, a Michigan Notable Book of 2009, will speak. Interim HealthCare will be providing Certified Nurse Assistants to provide respite care to allow family caregivers to attend this event. Call 734-468-3746 to arrange for this service.

Financial Awareness for Older Adults

As adults over 55 with low income and disabilities strive to stay in their homes, the threat of theft, fraud, and other forms of financial exploitation increase. To become more educated about this, they, their caregivers and service agencies who assist them, Michigan Ability Partners (MAP) is offering training to increase financial management skills. This is made possible by a grant from The Anna Botsford Bach Fund for Seniors at the Ann Arbor Area Community Foundation. MAP will promote this service through the organizations in the Washtenaw Elder Justice Coalition. For more information call Misty Hendershot, MAP Payee Supervisor at 734-975-6880.

The Future of Ann Arbor Senior Center

A few years ago the Ann Arbor Parks & Recreation Dept. began an evaluation of the social and recreational programming at the Ann Arbor Senior Center in Burns Park. The strategic recommendations finalized in 2011 contain some interesting findings. With more than 30,000 people over 50 living in Ann Arbor, only 250 actively use the AASC, and most of them are over 70. Some reasons given for this are the many offerings this culturally rich area provides that mature adults participate in as well as the general good health and wealth the mature population who live here enjoy. Even the term “senior” is questioned because it’s a label many don’t care for.

Organize to Challange Elder Abuse

On Friday, Sept. 23, 9-11 am, at United Way of Washtenaw, 2305 Platt Rd., the first public meeting of the Washtenaw Elder Justice Coalition will take place, sponsored by Neighborhood Senior Services and Blueprint for Aging. This new organization will work to engage and educate our community about the very real issue of elder abuse and neglect. The featured speaker is Ron Tatro, a nationally certified trainer on elder abuse issues and Director of Elder Abuse Prevention Services for Elder Law of Michigan, a non-profit organization. This event is free of charge.

Older Michiganians Day 2011

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Almost 800 older persons and advocates from across the state will converge on the State Capitol on June 15, from 9:50 am to 2:00 pm, to celebrate our growing senior population and urge elected officials to make policies and budget decisions that are senior-friendly.

The theme for this fourth annual rally, Older Michiganians Day 2011, is The Senior WAVE – We Advocate, Vote, and Enrich Communities. Older Michiganians Day is named for the state law that earmarks state funding for older adult services and establishes the Commission on Services to the Aging and the Michigan Office of Services to the Aging (OSA). The OSA and Commission oversee the network of sixteen Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs). The state law makes approximately $30 million in state funds available for home delivered meals, adult day care, volunteer programs and other services each fiscal year.

Contact Ann Langford for more information and free tickets to this event by email at alangford@aaa1b.com or by phone at (248) 262-1282.

Creative Longevity and Positive Aging

Within the next 8-10 years, 65 year old adults will outnumber children five and under for the first time in our history. The gap between retirement and death has significantly increased due to the general health and functioning of our senior population. As we live longer and face the financial, relational, and health factors often associated with longevity, effective coping strategies become increasingly important to the maintenance of creative, healthy lifestyles. Todd K. Favorite, Ph.D., Director of the UM Psychological Clinic, will help us explore these issues of our aging society and answer questions on Wed., June 8 at Malletts Creek Branch, 7-8:30 pm.

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