An eerie coincidence?

Did you feel the earthquake this morning (Friday, April 18) at about 5:45 a.m.? The epicenter was in Illinois but some Ann Arborites who were up that early felt some weird vibrations. Adding to that weirdness was my discovery that on April 18, 1906, the catastrophic San Francisco earthquake hit, and because of resulting fires, most of the city burned to the ground. That quake measured 8.3 on the Richter scale and was felt from Southern Oregon to south of Los Angeles and as far east as central Nevada. Scientists later determined that the San Andreas Fault had moved about 23 feet. To learn more about earthquakes, check out the Library's books and dvds.

Yes! The Earth DOES revolve around the Sun.

On April 11, 1633, Gallilco Galilei was put on trial by the Inquisition for his preposterous claim, originally stated by Copernicus that the Earth revolved around the Sun. When Galileo wrote a book titled, Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, he angered Pope Urban VIII who contended that any theory not seeing the Earth as the center of the universe went against scripture. Galileo was placed on house arrest for the rest of his life at his home in Florence where he eventually went blind and died in 1642. It wasn't until 1835 that the Vatican removed the book from its list of banned books and in 1992, the Catholic Church formally admitted that Galileo was right.

Melting Away: Protecting the Poles

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UM Exhibit Museum of Natural History presents the last Polar Science Adventures in the series! Explore the effects of the melting of land ice and sea ice. How will it affect polar animals or people? What can we do to help right now?

Join this workshop for children ages 6-11 and an adult to learn about the Artic and Antarctica. Activities are designed to be accomplished with collaboration between adults and kids. Register at any public services desk or call the library at 327-4200 and choose a session. Walk-ins are also welcome!
Pittsfield Wednesday, March 26th, 4:30-5:30 PM
Malletts Creek Saturday, March 29th, 10-11 AM
Northeast Saturday, March 29th, 2-3 PM

Frosty Life: Surviving the Poles

What animals live at the poles and how do they survive? Discover how polar bears swim in ice-cold water and other sub-zero animals live through extreme temperatures through hands-on experiments. Find out all about artic animals in this fun-filled adult/child workshop presented by the UM Exhibit Museum of Natrual History. Call any information desk to register your spot in a branch or drop in. Workshop for children ages 6-11 with an adult.

Pittsfield Branch, Wednesday, February 20, 4:30-5:30 PM
Malletts Creek Branch, Saturday, February 23, 10-11 AM
Northeast Branch, Saturday, February 23, 2-3 PM

Mysteries of Antarctica and the Artic

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Spend the day at the UM Exhibit Museum of Natural History to learn more about the Poles. Check out the Antarctica's Climate Secrets: One Teacher's Story exhibit on the Museum's fourth floor to learn about Robin Frisch-Gleason's recent trip to Antarctica. Robin is an Ann Arbor 4th grade teacher, who took the trip as part of the Antarctic Drilling Project (ANDRILL). Learn how the drilling project collected ocean floor core samples to research the long-term climate changes in Antarctica, and see a real set of Extreme Cold Weather gear.

Also check out the exhibit in the Museum's Rotunda lobby called From Pole to Pole: UM Research at the Ends of the Earth. Learn how UM Scientists are investigating pollutants in the Artic and frozen mammoths in Siberia.

Ice Worlds: Why are the Poles so Cold?

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Where are the North and South Poles, and why are they so cold? What’s the difference between seawater and fresh water? Sea ice and land ice? How do layers of ice stack up? From ice cores to ocean currents, we’ll learn about the coldest places on Earth in this exciting science workshop held in collaboration with the UM Exhibit Museum of Natural History. The workshop is for children ages 6-11 and their adult guardian. Activities are created for both adults and children to complete together.

Call the Youth Desk at 327-8301 or ask at any service desk to register for the program. Choose from the following dates:
Wednesday, Jan. 16, 4:30-5:30 PM at the Pittsfield Branch
Saturday, Jan. 19, 10-11 AM at the Malletts Creek Branch
Saturday, Jan. 19, 2-3 PM at the Northeast Branch

Read up on the topic in these great books: Life in the polar lands by Monica Byles, Icebergs, Ice Caps and Glaciers by Allan Fowlar, Shackleton’s Stowaway by Victoria McKernan, and Polar Bears Past Bedtime by Mary Pope Osborne.

Darwin's famous journey

It was on December 27, 1831 that Charles Darwin sailed from England on the HMS Beagle. During this trip to South America and the Galapagos Islands, Darwin explored the rainforests and made some amazing discoveries about the plants and animals he found there. It was on the Islands that Darwin began to formulate his theories that later became the groundbreaking book, The Origin of the Species, a book that would create one of the greatest scientific controversies of modern times.

Fun for the kids over winter break!

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The Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum is featuring a family day themed "The Big Freeze" running December 26-31 from 10am-5pm. You'll be able to check out liquid nitrogen demonstrations, hands-on ice cream making, arctic facts and live reindeer. Check the museum's full schedule for those days to see what activities are happening when!
Hands-on Museum, $8 (members and infants free), 220 E. Ann St. 995-5439.

Physics + Wild Fun = Good Book

Bestselling author and scientist Stephen Hawking and his daughter Lucy Hawking have a children’s book out that has strong gravitational pull on our 11-year-old son. In fact, reading George’s Secret Key to the Universe is keeping him up way past bedtime. The major attraction is a super-computer named Cosmos who allows George and his friends to travel through the universe, as they learn about time and space. But what if the wrong people got Cosmos? That would be bad. The book's website says sequels are planned in 2008 and 2009.

50 Years and 5 Million Miles In the Making

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Plus never before seen footage from extraterrestrial film that had to be taken out of NASA's liquid nitrogen storage! How many movies can boast that? Today, In the Shadow of the Moon opens at the Michigan Theater. In the 1960s, 400,000 people joined forces to show what the human race can achieve when we work together. They did the impossible--they sent Man to the Moon and safely returned our brave tour guides to Earth. And they achieved this goal in under a decade! Want more info on the Apollo Missions? AADL has it.
Not going to go see the movie because you think the moon landings were hoaxes? Buzz Aldrin's fist will certainly tell you otherwise!

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