Unsolved Mystery....Solved?

Eerie coincidences, unexplained voices coming through television sets, cryptic, even rambling messages appearing as if out of nowhere embedded in seemingly impossible parts of city streets...somebody knows something about the Toynbee tiles, but nobody's talking....

For decades, people have been happening upon hundreds of these mysterious tiles in cities as far west as Kansas City, as far north as Boston, and as far south as Santiago, Chile. Yes, even Detroit has a few, though it's not really clear if both are still there or if they've been paved over. All have a variation of the same message:

Toynbee Idea
in Kubrick's 2001
Resurrect Dead
on Planet Jupiter

But what do they mean? Who put them there and how? Who is Arnold Toynbee, and what does he have to do with 2001: A Space Odyssey? Are the Toynbee tiles messages from aliens? Time travel blueprints? Paranoid and even anti-Semitic rants? 9/11 predictions? Just another form of street art?

Like a lot of people, I'd never heard of this mystery before. I stumbled upon it just as if it was a Toynbee tile itself when I checked out the fantastic 2011 documentary, "Resurrect Dead: The Mystery of the Toynbee Tiles." Deliciously creepy, even spine-tingling at times, with otherwordly music and strangely-lit interviews with colorful characters, this film does a great job of explaining the phenomenon...and just might even solve it. Originally a Kickstarter project, the film went on to receive several accolades including Best Director at the Sundance Film Festival. If you plan to watch, I'd recommend staying away from Wikipedia beforehand as it could ruin a bit of the suspense-factor here. Those who remember the show "Unsolved Mysteries" and fans of "The X-Files" will appreciate the style of this documentary!

Melancholia, on DVD

Writer and director Lars von Trier’s latest film, Melancholia, is not just another “end of the world” movie, it’s also a story of the complex relationship between two sisters. A wedding reception at a lavish Scandinavian countryside home sets the scene for this dark and beautifully made film. Newlyweds Justine and Michael celebrate their nuptials at the home of Justine’s sister Claire and her scientist husband John. With their opinionated family members in attendance, including the girls’ mother who bad mouths all marriages, it makes for quite the melancholy reception. Kirsten Dunst portrays the deeply depressed bride so wonderfully that it appears effortless, which earned her the best actress prize at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival.

The dreary state of the reception leads one to believe that the new marriage is doomed from the start. At the same time, the planet Melancholia is on a slow path towards earth, which has the sisters on edge as they try to comfort Claire's son and deal with Justine's illness while the giant blue planet's collision course taunts them. It is cinematically breathtaking and unsettling. I’m not usually a fan of films of an apocalyptic nature, but there’s something about this one. Perhaps he beauty helps balance the tension?

Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop

The documentary Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop is an intimate, behind-the-scenes look at O’Brien’s 32-city music and comedy show known as The Legally Prohibited from Being Funny on Television Tour.

The tour was a result of O’Brien stepping away from "The Tonight Show" after a dramatic dispute with NBC over moving the show’s timeslot from 11:35 pm to 12:05 am, following Jay Leno. O’Brien didn’t agree with the deal and walked away from the show with a settlement, but was contractually banned from appearing on radio or TV for six months.

The talk show host didn’t want to stop the late-night comedy act, so he took it on the road, in a most interesting fashion. I saw it performed live, and it was indeed a wonderful ruckus.

The film is an in-depth look into the birth of the tour, how the live comedic material was brought to life. It follows O’Brien and crew on an emotional backstage look at what it takes to do so much in so little time. Conan fans will appreciate the candid look at his life during such a tumultuous time. Two weeks after the successful live show wrapped, O’Brien began preparations for his newest late night show, Conan, which now airs on TBS.

AADL Staff Picks Goes to the Movies

The Staff Picks shelf is downtown on the first floor. Why not get ready for the holiday weekend with a few movies? Here are a few new for April.

Trekkies: “Interviewing hundreds of devoted fans and such Star Trek cast members as Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Michelle Nichols, Walter Koenig, Kate Mulgrew and Brent Spiner, the film creates an entertaining and endearing portrait of the landmark series that has touched the lives of people around the world. Thumbs Up"—Roger Ebert

Two in the Wave: “Directors Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut changed the face of cinema forever as members of the French New Wave. A present-tense essay that is both time capsule and collage…a powerful reminder of just how exciting that work remains.”—NYT. Cannes Film Festival Official Selection, NYT Critic’s Pick.

Paper Moon: “The year is 1936. Orphaned Addie Loggins (Tatum O'Neal, in her film debut) is left in the care of unethical travelling Bible salesman Moses Pray (Ryan O'Neal, Tatum's dad), who may or may not be her father. En route to Addie's relatives, Moses learns that the 9-year-old is quite a handful: she smokes, cusses, and is almost as devious and manipulative as he is. They join forces as swindlers, working together so well that Addie is averse to breaking up the team -- which is one reason that she sabotages the romance between Moses and good-time gal Trixie Delight (Madeline Kahn).—Rotten Tomatoes “Tatum O'Neal creates a character out of thin air, makes us watch her every moment and literally makes the movie work.”—Roger Ebert, Sun Times

Darwin’s Nightmare: “Forty years ago, a voracious predator is introduced into the waters of Tanzania’s Lake Victoria where it quickly extinguishes the entire stock of native fish. Its ecological impact aside, the Nile Perch becomes highly prized for its tender, plump fillets, barely meeting the demand at elegant 4-star restaurants. Harrowing…indispensable…an extraordinary work”—NYT. Winner Venice Film Festival, Best Documentary European Film Awards

Lenny Bruce, Performance Film: “Bursting with an indignation that remains freshly irreverent and blackly funny.”—NYT

Family Time at the Ann Arbor Film Festival

Saturday, March 31, 2012: 11am @ the Michigan Theater

Does your family enjoy going to the movies? Want to attend a family-friendly event at this year's Ann Arbor Film Festival?

AADL is participating in the 50th Ann Arbor Film Festival as a community partner for Ages 6+ Films in Competition, taking place Saturday, March 31st @ 11am at the Michigan Theater. If you enter this code - AAFF50AADL - when buying online tickets, you will get $2 off the advance ticket price ($5 standard).

This visually engaging program of 10 films includes animation, music videos, documentaries and a computer-generated 3D film made in 1971. Recommended for ages 6 and up.

The Tree, on DVD

Australian cinema brings us another beautiful, rare gem of a film. The Tree is a film adaptation of Julie Pascoe’s bestselling novel, Our Father Who Art in a Tree. Filmmaker Julie Bertuccelli had always wanted to adapt the book The Baron in the Trees, by Italo Calvino, but it wasn’t possible. So she went looking for another tree story, and happily found Pascoe’s novel.

Set in breathtaking Australia, a mother and her four children are forced to cope with the sudden death of her husband and the children’s father. They all do this in their own way, but several find comfort in the giant fig tree that grows directly next to the family’s house. The lone daughter Simone, age 8, begins hearing her father whisper to her through the tree. She shares this with her mother, who then also begins to find comfort in the tree. The tree really is the largest character in the story, and it’s easy to see how it comes to life and takes over the family and the house. It’s done in such a beautiful and literary way, and is a wonderful metaphor for dealing with grief. It's also powerful how the tree is used to represent the force of nature and its affect on people.

For more Australian films of note that are available at AADL, check here.

AADL Talks To: Donald Harrison about the 50th Ann Arbor Film Festival

For half a century now, the end of March has meant one thing to Ann Arbor: the Ann Arbor Film Festival. This year's 50th festival will be both a celebration of that half-century history and the opportunity to see the latest in experimental and independent cinema that AAFF has always been. In this podcast, AAFF Executive Director Donald Harrison talks with us about the process of planning the 50th, deciding what films to highlight from the festival's history and what artists to bring back. We also talk about the new work on offer this year and some of the events around town that Ann Arborites can look forward to. The 50th Ann Arbor Film Festival runs from March 27 - April 1, 2012.

To learn more about the history of the Ann Arbor Film Festival, visit the Ann Arbor Film Festival Archive, a collaboration between AADL and AAFF that brings historic festival programs, posters, flyers, newspaper articles, and photos together with contemporary interviews to tell the story of AAFF's first 50 years.

Attachment Size
AADL_Talks_To-AAFF50_Donald_Harrison.mp3 25.9 MB

Hunger Game Fans!

Now that you've read the trilogy, what's next? For starters, check out this great interview with Jennifer Lawrence, while you're waiting for the movie release on March 23. Or you could head to this website and try the simulation game to see if you have what it takes to survive the games. Remember it takes more than just strength.
If you're still skeptical whether the movie will do the book justice, keep in mind that Neil Gaiman has seen it and said that he enjoyed it 'a lot.' Or if you want to hear what the author has to say about the Hunger Games trilogy, click here to hear an interview.
If you're looking for some Hunger Games read-a-likes, you might like a few of these: Feed, Ender's Game, Maze Runner, Little Brother, Unwind or House of Scorpion.
By the way, the second movie, Catching Fire, is set to be released on November 22, 2013.

New Movies About Movies

The Oscars have come and gone, and two big winners were The Artist and Hugo. A marvelous thing about the 2012 Oscars is that the program celebrated movies and the movie-going experience. This made The Artist and Hugo winning all the more special, since both films are about the splendor of movies.

The Artist is a romantic comedy that is both silent and black & white. What a treat that such a 21st century rarity stole the best film prize! In the movie, silent film star George Valentin makes movie after movie and is a huge star. This is threatened with the birth of talkies! Sound in films, as well as the fact that it is embraced by audiences and new film starlet Peppy Miller, sends George into a downward spiral. It’s a truly enchanting film, and I loved seeing it on the big screen. I was at first leery of the premise, but from the first scene I was instantly knocked over with its magic. (Also available on Blu-ray.)

Hugo is based on the wonderful youth novel, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, by Brian Selznick. The books is filled with amazing illustrations that tell half the story, so it was great to see how director Martin Scorsese translated it all onto the big screen. Hugo tells the tale of an orphan boy living a secret life in the walls of a Paris train station in 1931. When Hugo encounters a broken automaton, an eccentric girl, and the cold, reserved man who runs the toy shop, he is caught up in a magical, mysterious adventure that could put all of his secrets in jeopardy. It’s a story filled with whimsy and chance as Hugo and his new friend Isabelle uncover the secret of her grandfather’s involvement in cinema history. (Also available on Blu-ray.)

March's Books to Film

The most anticipated feature film this spring is perhaps The Hunger Games (PG-13), to be release on March 23rd, based on the novel by Suzanne Collins. In a bleak future, the United States has been reduced to a dictatorship with 12 districts. Every year, in order to prevent uprisings, the ruling Capitol forces one boy and one girl from each district to fight each other to the death in a nationally televised arena --- and only one will survive. Pitted against highly-trained Tributes who have prepared for these Games their entire lives, Katniss is forced to rely upon her sharp instincts and make impossible choices in the arena that weigh survival against humanity and life against love if she's ever to return home.

Dr. Seuss' The Lorax is the 3D-CG adaptation of the classic tale of a forest guardian who shares the enduring power of hope. The animated adventure follows the journey of a 12-year-old as he searches for a real Truffula Tree, the one thing that will enable him to win the affection of the girl of his dreams. To get it, he must find the story of the Lorax, the acerbic yet charming character who fights to protect his world.

John Carter, a Disney production (PG-13) based on Sci-fi novel A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs. From Academy Award-winning filmmaker Andrew Stanton, this sweeping action adventure set on the mysterious and exotic planet of Barsoom (Mars) tells the story of John Carter, who is inexplicably embroiled in a conflict of epic proportions amongst the inhabitants of the planet, and discovers that the survival of Barsoom and its people rests in his hands.

Based on the fairy tale of Snow White by The Brothers Grimm, Mirror, Mirror (rated PG) retells a wicked enchantress's schemes and scrambles to control a spirited orphan's throne and the attention of a charming prince. A star-studded cast - with Julia Roberts as the Evil Queen; the fresh-faced Lily Collins as Snow White; gorgeous leading man Armie Hammer as the Prince, and the incomparable Nathan Lane as Brighton, the Queen’s right hand man.

THE MOVIE I AM MOST EAGER TO SEE :
Already out on the coasts but hopefully coming to theaters near us is Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, starring eye-candy Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt, and the dynamicKristin Scott Thomas; directed by Lasse Hallström (Chocolat)

Based on the 2007 novel by Paul Torday, where a visionary sheik believes the peaceful pastime of salmon fishing can enrich the lives of his people, and he dreams of bringing the sport to the not so fish-friendly desert. Willing to spare no expense in order to turn the dream into reality, he enlists Britain's leading fisheries expert and the Prime Minister's overzealous press secretary. This unlikely team will embark on an upstream journey of faith and fish to prove the impossible, possible. Check out the recent review and trailer in EW.

Syndicate content