Detroit News Fine Arts Writer Michael Hodges Discusses Michigan's Vanishing Train Stations: Architecture, History And Sense Of Place

Wednesday November 28, 2012: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

In this lecture and slideshow, Detroit News reporter Michael H. Hodges discusses the functional and stylistic evolution of the train station over the 19th and early 20th centuries, and the range of styles architects employed to both tame and exalt rail transportation.

Hodges' new coffee-table book, Michigan's Historic Railroad Stations photographs and profiles 31 depots (including Ann Arbor) across the state.

Michael will also sign copies of the book (which will be for sale) following the event.

UMS Night School Session 3: HILL-ELUJAH! The Messiah And UMS Traditions At Hill

Monday November 19, 2012: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Professor Mark Clague joins us again as host and resident scholar for Session 3 of UMS Night School.

Students will learn about the origins of the UMS Messiah performance in Ann Arbor, the beginnings of UMS, and other UMS traditions that make Hill Auditorium a special place for our community.

These 90-minute "classes" combine conversation, interactive exercises, and "lectures" with genre experts to draw you into the themes behind each performance.

2012 National Book Award winners have been announced

Last night, the The National Book Award winners for 2012 were announced at a gala event at the posh Cipriani on Wall Street.

The big winners were:

Louise Erdrich, 58, received the fiction award for The Round House. An adult Joe Coutts looks back in time when, as a teenager, he went in search of the man who brutalized his mother on an Ojibwe reservation in North Dakota. This winning title is part two of a trilogy. The Coutts family was first introduced in The Plague of Doves (2008). Erdrich's win is especially poignant as, shortly after she started writing The Round House, she was diagnosed with a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer, which she has beat.Ms. Erdrich, who is part Ojibwe, delighted last night's audience by addressing some of her remarks in her tribal tongue.

Katherine Boo, 48, a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer for the The New Yorker, received the nonfiction award for Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life,Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity, a wrenching account of a teenage boy who lives in the slums that are hidden from view by some of India's luxury hotels.

Poet David Ferry, 88, tearfully accepted what he described as "preposterous pre-posthumous award" for his Bewilderment; New Poems and Translations. "We're all in this apart" (From FoundSingle-Line Poems). Ferry has a PhD from Harvard and is the Sophie Chantal Hart Professor Emeritus of English at Wellesley, where he taught for many years.

William Joseph Alexander, 36, is a first-time novelist who captured the Young People's Literature prize for his fantasy, Goblin Secrets. In this steampunk/witch-infested tale, Rownie escapes Graba who 'adopts' orphans to do her bidding, and sets out on a quest to find his missing older brother.

Rounding out the evening, host Faith Salie, a media star on NPR, the BBC and CBS Sunday Morning, bestowed two special awards. Detroit author, Elmore Leonard, 88, accepted the Distinguished Contribution to American Letters prize. New York Times publisher, Arthur Sulzberger, Jr., 61, was honored for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community. NPR's Fresh Air host, Terry Gross, introduced Mr. Sulzberger and said the New York Times Book Review was like "...a shopping catalog...[for] authors I've overlooked."

Each winner received $10,000.

Vote for your favorite Michigan author

Nominate your favorite Michigan Author so the Michigan Library Association can reward them! Any author who lives in Michigan or writes about Michigan can win, regardless of the genre they write, as long as they have published at least 3 titles. See the list of authors who have won over the years and access the nomination form here. This year's winner was Bonnie Jo Campbell, author of Once Upon a River and several other Michigan based books.

Reporting the Election: The Michigan Radio Elections Team

Wednesday October 24, 2012: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Pittsfield Branch: Program Room

Are you a fan and listener of Michigan Radio? Don't miss the chance to see Michigan Radio's Elections Team: Vincent Duffy, Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta. You've heard their voices on the radio, now hear them in-person!

The 2012 election is in its final weeks and our special guests will discuss the challenges of covering races across Michigan and the speed bumps that occur on the campaign trail for reporters, candidates and politicos.

Do not miss this special discussion, co-sponsored by Michigan Radio and The League of Women Voters of the Ann Arbor Area.

Storytelling with the Stars on the Autumnal Equinox

Friday, September 21, 2012: 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Grab a free star map this Friday evening and join us for a stellar storytelling journey bringing the stars and constellations alive on the eve of the autumnal equinox. Mary Stewart Adams, storyteller, star lore historian, and one of the primary movers behind the recently established Michigan Dark Sky Coast, has studied the star tales and myths of many cultures and she'll be your guide to our starry night.

After the program, three lucky attendees will get to take home one of our circulating telescopes!

As the Program Director for the Headlands International Dark Sky Park in Emmett county, Mary regularly tells star stories on the dark shores of Lake Michigan. She recently talked with us about her passion for reconnecting us with the night sky and about the passage of Michigan Public Act 251, establishing a 23,000-acre Dark Sky Preserve in Michigan.

Michigan Park and Read Runs Through Oct. 1

The Michigan Park and Read program runs through Oct. 1, so why not take advantage of the fall weather? To check out a pass, visit any AADL location with your library card. Your Park and Read pass allows you to avoid paying the Recreation Passport entry fee into Michigan state parks and recreation areas. In Southeast Michigan the list includes Pinckney Recreation Area, Maybury State Park, and Waterloo Recreation Area. Passes are also good at 11 museums and historic sites, including Mann House and Walker Tavern. You can use your pass during daytime hours for seven days from checkout. Some parks loan hammocks, in case you'd like to stretch out and read a good book or magazine you may want to check out. Very tempting!

Research Scientists From the United States Geological Survey: Wednesday, September 19th at 7pm

Join us at our downtown location on Wednesday, September 19th at 7pm when four members of the United States Geological Survey will talk about their latest research on the Great Lakes.

Dr. David Warner, a Research Fishery Biologist, will discuss the USGS Deepwater Science Program spanning Great Lakes ecology, ecology of invasive species and remote sensing in ecology.

Dr. Bruce Manny, a Research Fishery Biologist, will speak about his work designing, researching and monitoring activities to restore spawning and nursery habitat for valued native fish species in the Huron-Erie Corridor.

Joseph Baustian, a Research Analyst, will discuss his work in the GLSC Coastal Ecosystems Branch currently focused on restoring coastal marshes in the Great Lakes basin.

David Galbraith, a Geographic Information Systems Specialist, working in the GLSC Coastal Ecosystems Branch, will speak about his work investigating the landscape ecology of invasive wetland flora.

Paddling Michigan's Hidden Beauty With Kayaking And Canoeing Expert Doc Fletcher

Tuesday September 18, 2012: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

PBS-featured Michigan author Doc Fletcher invites you to enjoy an hour-long photographic journey down rivers selected from his canoeing and kayaking books, including his new 2012 book Paddling Michigan's Hidden Beauty: The Rivers, The Towns, The Taverns. The event also includes a book signing and books will be on sale.

Take a virtual trip down several rivers & discover what makes each of them uniquely FUN! Histories of towns along the way are shared and tales are told of local, old-time, neighborhood taverns in those riverside towns. At the end of the program there will be a drawing for a free canoe or kayak trip, good for a day trip down one of Michigan's rivers!

Teamwork and Timbers: It's Barn Raisin' Time!

Saturday September 15, 2012: 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm -- Pittsfield Branch: Program Room

Reconstruct a quarter-scale replica barn! Held in partnership with the Michigan Barn Preservation Network, this event is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to experience a traditional community barn raising.

Common in Michigan during the late-19th and early-20th centuries, barn raisings are similar to husking bees and quilting bees, where neighbors depended upon each other to accomplish what they could not do alone.

This event is for Grade 3 - Adult.

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