Treasures of MLibrary

Three extremely cool reasons to visit the Treasures of the Library Exhibit in the Audubon Room of U-M Harlan Hatcher Library: a 2250-year-old papyrus document from ancient Philadelphia, reporting the loss of a donkey; a 400-year-old manuscript by Galileo, in which he explains the usefulness of the telescope; and the first book purchased by the U-M Board of Regents, "The Birds of America," published in 1838, with original drawings by John James Audubon. Awesome! The exhibit is free and open to the public through May 23, Mon-Fri 8:30am-7pm, Sat 10am-6pm, and Sun 1-7pm. Use the Diag entrance.

Carlo and the Really Nice Librarian

I MUST share this fabulous picture book find with you! Carlo, a young giraffe, visits the new library with his father. The crocodile librarian, Mrs. Chinca, seems a little scary. Carlo soon realizes, however, that Mrs. Chinca is not only very friendly but also extremely knowledgeable about books. Carlo and the Really Nice Librarian is illustrated with cheerful watercolor, ink and collage. With sweet little details like a card catalog, a library card application, and the circulation desk, this would be a perfect story to share with a child who is about to visit a library for the fircarlocarlost time.

By Jove! What a collection!

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On this day in 1759, the British Museum opened to the public in the Bloomsbury district of London. The original collection was donated by a doctor, Sir Hans Sloane who had amassed what he called "a cabinet of curiosities." The collection included thousands of books, manuscripts, items from the nature and art objects from around the world. The round, domed Reading Room was built over a hundred years later and could hold one million volumes. Until recently, only those who presented an almost exhaustive life history as well as references could use the collection. Some lucky users included Bram Stoker, author of Dracula, Virginia Woolf, Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, Gandhi and George Orwell. Lenin was initially denied access because of difficulty locating a reference. The museum has created digital records of items in their collection which can be accessed on their website. The Library also owns many books that contain objects that belong to their collections.

Take a survey and help the Michigan Electronic Library

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Have a few minutes? If so, consider helping the Michigan Electronic Library (MeL) by taking this survey. In an effort to continue improving MeL resources, including the popular MeLCat state-wide catalog, the Library of Michigan is conducting a study on the Michigan eLibrary to make sure libraries and Michigan residents get the most benefit from the program. The survey takes only a few minutes to complete...and you may be surprised to discover what's available for free through MeL.

Discussing the Future of the Book

At this time next week (Saturday, October 10th, 9:30-4:45) a discussion about the future of the book will be in full swing in the Clements Library. Students from the University of Michigan's chapter of the Special Libraries Association will be hosting the 3 panel event, which will include AADL's own Eli Neiburger.

With the future of information creation, storage, and dissemination being such a popular and immense topic, nationally known authors like David Weinberger (Everything is Miscellaneous) and Clay Shirky (Here Comes Everybody) have been able to create full careers. But it is also a topic important to the local community, reflected by the University of Michigan's participation in the Google Books Search, the closing of the Ann Arbor News and the closing of the Shaman Drum bookstore.

Check out the full list of panelists and their bios. If you decide to join in the discussion next week registration is recommended.future of the bookfuture of the book

Just what the patient ordered

Recently a patron browsing BOCDs to take to a hospitalized friend decided to also check out Overdrive and the Michigan Library Consortium site -- to download audio books. One title that caught her interest was Banker to the Poor. To learn more about using Overdrive and the MLC site – how to find titles, manage downloads, and find programs for downloaded material – sign up for Overdrive Basics, an AADL class coming up Oct. 5, 7-9 p.m. at the downtown library.

When it all started

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On July 1, 1731, Benjamin Franklin founded the first circulating library which was a model for the many public libraries in the U.S. He began it as a way to settle intellectual arguments with a group of friends called the Junto who discussed civil matters and eventually morphed into the present American Philosophical Society. Each of the charter members bought a share which provided funds to buy books. In exchange, they could borrow books. They called their library the Library Company of Philadelphia. The books were moved to the Pennsylvania State House which is now known as Independence Hall.

Lost in Library Land?

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Are you new to Ann Arbor or the USA? We would be happy to give you or your group a library tour. Call 327-8311 at least two weeks before your requested date. These tours can be very helpful for English language learners who want to utilize what Ann Arbor District Library has to offer, like My Account and our awesome Research Pages. We offer five types of tours including the Malletts Creek Green Tour and a Class Research Tour. Take a look and check out a book!

AADL Blogs

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I’m sure many aadl.org visitors are familiar with the staff written blogs that show up on the main catalog page. If you don’t wish to read through them all and just want to read ones on music, magazines, or perhaps movies, with a few clicks you can. Blogs are accessible on various pages of aadl.org, under Services, Events, Research, etc. (You can also see a refined list by clicking on the blog’s categories.) Did you know there is a Local History blog and a Developer’s blog? Have a peek! Here is a quick list of the blogs, with a quick link so you can easily RSS them and stay on top of AADL and community happenings.

Happy Birthday, Mrs. Betty Ford!

Next month former First Lady Betty Ford will turn 91, and to help us all anticipate that, her former assistant press secretary will appear at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library at the University of Michigan. Patti Matson will talk about “Betty Ford: Strength in a Package Marked Fragile” on March 31 (Tuesday), at 7:30 p.m. Mrs. Ford is the founder of the Betty Ford Center for substance abuse and addiction and a Congressional Gold Medal recipient. You can see wonderful images of her life in our AP Images database.

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