World Language Books on CD


Did you know that the library has books on CD (or BOCDs) in different languages at the Downtown branch in both Youth and Adult? Languages that we currently have BOCDs for are Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish.

All are shelved after the books in the respective language in either the Youth (1st floor) or Adult (3rd floor) World Language Collection. They have the same loan period as regular BOCDs. And, as with many of our other materials, you can place holds and request them for pick up at any of our branches. You can find them in our catalog here or by doing a search by call number for ' bocd world*' for the adult (or click here) and ' youth-bocd world* ' for the youth (or click here).

Next Week In Booklists

Notable Dates for the Week of November 15 to November 21

November 15 The King’s Feast is celebrated in Belgium.

November 16 Learn a new word or two on Icelandic Language Day.

November 17 Try to set a new record on Guiness World Record Day.

November 18 Latvian Independence Day.

November 19 Gettysburg Address Day.

November 20 Transgender Day of Remembrance.

November 21 Start of Better Conversation Week running from the 21st to the 27th.

Spanish Storytime!

Join us at the Malletts Creek Branch every Saturday afternoon at 1:30, beginning on September 10, 2011. Native Spanish speakers will tell stories and lead songs in Spanish. Participants do not need to understand Spanish to enjoy this event!

Author Birthdays: Lorca, Scarry, Drabble

June 5th marks the birthday of authors Federico García Lorca, Richard Scarry, and Margaret Drabble.

Federico García Lorca was a Spanish poet and playwright who is believed to have been killed during the Spanish Civil War. Some of his unpublished poems and essays were collected in a volume in 1998, A Season in Granada; the overall theme of the collection is Granada, where Lorca was supposedly killed.

Lorca's works also include: In Search of Duende, which describes theories on dance, music, and bullfights; the play Yerma, which was made into a Spanish language film; and a collection of his letters, which gives a sort of autobiography of his life.

Richard Scarry was an American author and illustrator of children's stories. His most well-known works include those about Busytown, a place inhabited by animals.

Scarry wrote for many ages; we have board books, picture books, and readers. We even have some of his works in Chinese.

Margaret Drabble is an English writer of novels and biographies, as well as some other assorted non-fiction subjects. Of these non-fiction works, AADL has a biography of Angus Wilson (a fellow novelist), and a book on jigsaw puzzles, The Pattern in the Carpet.

Drabble's novels include: The Red Queen, which details the story of a London woman who receives an unpublished memoir of a Korean princess; The Seven Sisters, which Library Journal noted as having "a character who describes herself accurately as having 'much to be ashamed about'"; and The Millstone, set in 1960s London.

Author Birthdays: Doyle, Hergé, Peck

May 22nd marks the birthday of authors Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Hergé, and M. Scott Peck.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a Scottish writer, most known for his stories of Sherlock Holmes. According to Wikipedia, there were 56 short stories and 4 novels about the detective written by Doyle.

Doyle's other works include those that focus on the character of Professor Challenger, and quite a few historical novels such as The White Company, which was set during the Hundred Years' War.

Hergé was a Belgian comic writer. His real name was Georges Prosper Remi, and you may know him if you've ever read a Tintin comic. We even have Tintin in the original French.

While Hergé also wrote a few other comics (Quick and Flupke, The Amiable Mr. Mops), copies of them are quite hard to find.

M. Scott Peck was an American author and psychiatrist. His most well-known book is The Road Less Traveled, about human fulfillment.

Peck's others works include Glimpses Of The Devil: A Psychiatrist's Personal Accounts Of Possession, Exorcism, And Redemption and Denial Of The Soul: Spiritual And Medical Perspectives On Euthanasia And Mortality, two of his more spiritual works.

Learning Languages: Teach Yourself

Check out the new language learning sets by one of the premier language resources and best sellers- Teach Yourself. Learn everyday language, grammar and vocabulary that is useful in real-life situations.

A book and audio CDs are included, leaving you one step closer to learning a new language, or improving one you already speak.

Some new languages recently added to AADL's collection are Icelandic, Japanese, Portuguese, Spoken Arabic, Old English, Dutch, Persian, Irish, Mandarin Chinese.

Check out the full list of language learning materials by Teach Yourself.

Author Birthdays: Aleichem, Seuss, Goodis

March 2nd marks the birthday of authors Sholem Aleichem, Dr. Seuss, and David Goodis.

Sholem Aleichem was a Yiddish writer from the Ukraine, and while you may not immediately recognize his work Tevye the Dairyman, you probably recognize its musical counterpart The Fiddler on the Roof.

Aleichem also wrote the novel Wandering Stars, a tale of the Yiddish theater, and his autobiography From the Fair, which CHOICE said "told in the third person, reveals a very rich picture of Jewish shtetl existence".

I feel no need to introduce such a person as Dr. Seuss. His real name was Theodor Seuss Geisel, and his Oh, The Places You'll Go! has probably been quoted at 2/3 of graduations since its publication. Though, my personal favorite has always been Hop on Pop.

Seuss's works have been translated into many languages; here at AADL we have his books in five aside from English--Spanish, Chinese, French, Russian, and Hebrew.

David Goodis was an American writer of noir, a sub-genre of hardboiled crime fiction. Many of his novels were made into noir movies as well, like Dark Passage and Shoot The Piano Player.

Goodis was not necessarily well liked. In one book, Geoffrey O'Brien called him "a poet of the losers. ... If Jack Kerouac had written crime novels, they might have sounded a bit like this".

Ghost in the Shell

Vast information networks, artificial intelligence, and cybernetics applied to the human body are the wave of the near-future in Masamune Shirow’s sci-fi thriller, Ghost in the Shell. Major Kusanagi, an operative of Section 9, must follow the trail of the Puppet Master, a mysterious hacker who can even access the human mind and manipulate memories. What Kusanagi doesn’t know is that the Puppet Master has been looking for her as well.

The film version of Ghost in the Shell received high critical praise upon its release in 1996 and has strongly influenced the genres of anime and science fiction. Empire magazine placed it at #92 on its list, The 100 Best Films of World Cinema.

Masamune Shirow also created the popular graphic novel series Appleseed. If you like futuristic manga involving cyborgs and existentialism, Masamune Shirow is the author for you!

The Red Balloon/ Le Ballon Rouge

The Red BalloonThe Red Balloon

I recently had the pleasure of showing a group of students (kindergarten-6th grade) the classic short film The Red Balloon. Filmed in 1956, it is the only short film ever to win an Oscar for best original screenplay. French director Albert Lamorisse's delightful film tells the story of a young boy who becomes friends with a large red balloon and the two become inseparable. (Incidentally, the young actor who played the boy is Lamorisse's son.) The two explore the streets of Paris together that paints a dazzling picture on screen.

I had my concerns about whether to show the film to the younger students, my thought was they would have a hard time sticking with it and understanding the story. Much to my surprise, the older students had the problem with the movie. It was as if they were unable to see the film from the perspective of a child. They spent so much time trying to figure out what the deal was with the balloon. Was it possessed? Was the boy dreaming? What was the point of the movie? However, the younger students were very taken by the film. They sat mesmerized at the beautiful landscape, the cute boy and, of course, the red balloon. They completely accepted the fact that the boy and the balloon were best friends and were filled with rage when the gang of bullies tried to come between them.

It is a short film, with a running time of 34 minutes. In this short window of time a beautiful story is told that is more than a joy to watch. My advice is to take it for what it is, don’t question it too much and try to watch it with childlike eyes.

An Epic Magazine Update -- Tigers, Fashion, and Valentine's Crafts

by belgianchocolate, Flickr.comby belgianchocolate, Flickr.com
This magazine update is truly epic, folks. Our magazine "in" box is swamped -- and I mean completely flooded -- with new magazines for all.

For the kiddos:
Zoobies -- This one's all about tigers. Adorable and fierce!
Iguana -- Cuentos, poemas, leyendas, y articulos. En Espanol, claro.
Scholastic Math -- The boys of Big Time Rush lead you through some painless problems.

For the teens:
Cicada -- Creative writing for teens, by teens.
WWE Magazine -- Wrestler Kaval tells all. Or at least some.
Lucky -- Going shopping? Find out what's in now! Before you perpetrate some serious fashion crimes on your friends.

And for the parental units:
Family Fun -- Valentine's Day crafts!
Book Links -- Multicultural literature. Hey, that sounds familiar.

With so many new magazines it's almost hard to know where to start. Dive in!

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