Teen (and Parent) Magazine Update -- Home Schooling, Conspiracy Theorists and Luchador Socks

image by Odin Fotografia, Flickr.comimage by Odin Fotografia, Flickr.com
As winter and spring duke it out for supremacy, a beautiful new collection of magazines has blossomed in our teen room. Check out these lovely flowers:

For Teens:
Audrey -- All about Actress Olivia Munn, plus an article on the presence of Asian-Americans in mainstream TV shows.

ESPN Magazine -- See athletes strut their stuff in this special Style Report, in more ways then one, plus Derrick Rose shows off his luchador socks.

Rolling Stone -- Where else can you see Snooki, rock star Sammy Hagar and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones in the same place? Plus, 2011's coolest new faces.

Sorry, parents, I've only got one magazine for you this time, but it's a good one:
Home Education Magazine has ideas on teaching your kids about gardening and food, as well as a list of books for Women's History Month!

Get out your umbrella and come check out these cool magazines!

Get Ready to Laugh!

Get Ready to Laugh!Get Ready to Laugh!

It's still winter. Let's warm things up with a day of laughter. Doug Scheer will be at AADL on Thursday, February 24 for two shows sure to liven things up. He will be at the Pittsfield Branch at 2:00 p.m. and Downtown for a show at 7:00 p.m. He will be doing his Laugh Factory show - with wacky jokes, off-the-wall games, insane contests, and even a few magical surprises.

The Laugh Factory | Thursday, February 24 | 2pm at the Pittsfield Branch and 7pm at the Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

Take Part in Art -- Marvelous Masks

image by C. P. Storm, Flickr.comimage by C. P. Storm, Flickr.com
From masquerade balls to dramatic performances, from exuberant carnivals to solemn ceremonies, people all over the world love wearing masks. Why are masks so popular? Maybe because wearing a mask lets us transform ourselves into anything we can imagine!

If you love masks, you can come to the art table in the downtown youth department to make some with us. Or you can join in at home:

Read!
Niño’s Mask – A young boy is told that he is too young to wear a mask in his village carnival. Won’t everyone be surprised when he makes a mask and becomes el perro – the dog – all by himself!
Behind the Mask – Kimin wonders what to wear for Halloween. When he discovers a mysterious mask among his grandfather’s things, he learns more about his own past.
The Art of African Masks – Discover how different cultures make and use masks in Africa.

Do!
Masks – Make masks from all over the world!
About.com has tons of ideas for making masks from egg cartons, plastic jugs, paper plates and all sorts of other stuff!
At PBS you can learn more about African masks, or you can make your own!

Try a mask today – they work for superheroes and luchadores, so you know they've gotta be good.

Magazine Update -- Lil Wayne, Edible Bugs, and Books about Sports

image by kevinzim, Flickr.comimage by kevinzim, Flickr.com
This month's magazines will stun and amaze you! Take a look...

For the young 'uns:
Creative Kids -- Featuring an interview with Katherine Paterson, author of Bridge to Terabithia!
Dig Magazine -- When is a hole in your head a good thing?
Ranger Rick -- Do you know that dolphins live in the Amazon River? And that people all over the world eat bugs? It's a strange world out there...

For the teens:
ESPN Magazine -- What's it like to be Jadeveon Clowney, who has been called the nation's number one high school football player? Read to find out!
Rolling Stone -- the Global Warming Hall of Shame and what Lil Wayne is up to these days.

For the parents:
American Baby -- baby traditions from all over the world, and a guide to scary symptoms that are really no big deal.
Horn Book -- What is 'YA Fatphobia'? Plus the favorite picture books of 2010, and a guide to good sports books for kids.
The Old Schoolhouse -- Tips for teaching technology, foreign language and writing skills at home.

I don't know about you, but I think these magazines sound fascinating. Especially that 'hole in the head' one. I'm already stunned and amazed!

Fun With Bugs!

During these cold winter months, that young insect enthusiast in your family may be craving the sight of those creepy, crawly bugs. Never fear! The library has many great ideas to keep that curiosity alive and, well, buzzing!

Lakeshore Learning Material's Giant Bug Collection is a new addition to our line-up of fun and educational toys for children's use during their visit to the Ann Arbor District Library. Enjoy some hands-on fun with these over-sized beetles, grasshoppers, ants, scorpion, and tarantula!

There are many ways to explore the insect world at home with books, movies, music, and websites:

The Red Balloon/ Le Ballon Rouge

The Red BalloonThe Red Balloon

I recently had the pleasure of showing a group of students (kindergarten-6th grade) the classic short film The Red Balloon. Filmed in 1956, it is the only short film ever to win an Oscar for best original screenplay. French director Albert Lamorisse's delightful film tells the story of a young boy who becomes friends with a large red balloon and the two become inseparable. (Incidentally, the young actor who played the boy is Lamorisse's son.) The two explore the streets of Paris together that paints a dazzling picture on screen.

I had my concerns about whether to show the film to the younger students, my thought was they would have a hard time sticking with it and understanding the story. Much to my surprise, the older students had the problem with the movie. It was as if they were unable to see the film from the perspective of a child. They spent so much time trying to figure out what the deal was with the balloon. Was it possessed? Was the boy dreaming? What was the point of the movie? However, the younger students were very taken by the film. They sat mesmerized at the beautiful landscape, the cute boy and, of course, the red balloon. They completely accepted the fact that the boy and the balloon were best friends and were filled with rage when the gang of bullies tried to come between them.

It is a short film, with a running time of 34 minutes. In this short window of time a beautiful story is told that is more than a joy to watch. My advice is to take it for what it is, don’t question it too much and try to watch it with childlike eyes.

Kids Kicking Cancer

KidsKickingCancer logoKidsKickingCancer logo

Kids Kicking Cancer is a weekly program provided by the Cancer Support Community of Greater Ann Arbor. It consists of martial arts, breathing, meditation and focus techniques that teach children tools to reduce pain, fear & anger. With their mantra 'Power, Peace, Purpose', participants learn how to de-stress themselves & teach others to do the same! The program is open to children with cancer, children of a parent with cancer and all siblings. To register or for more information call the Kids Kicking Cancer office at (313) 557-0021, contact cindy@kidskickingcancer.net, or Cancer Support Community at (734) 975-2500.

Guys Read

Need help finding books for male reluctant readers? Try the Guys Read website! The brainchild of beloved children's writer Jon Scieszka, author of The Stinky Cheese Man And Other Fairly Stupid Tales and the Time Warp Trio series, the website includes a list of books proven to catch the interest of boys. Also part of this innovative literacy program are a series of anthologies edited by Scieszka himself, including Guys Write For Guys Read and Guys Read: Funny Business.

Author Birthdays: Hecht, Sontag, Nabb

January 16th marks the birthday of authors Anthony Hecht, Susan Sontag, and Magdalen Nabb.

Anthony Hecht was an American poet. An award was established in his name the year after his death. He became a Pulitzer Prize winner in 1968 for his work The Hard Hours, as well as the 2004 National Medal of Arts winner, which was given posthumously.

Hecht's other collections include The Darkness and the Light, which uses translations of ancient, medieval, and modern poets, and The Transparent Man, which Library Journal said "delivers elegies, lyrics, and dramatic monologs with equal grace and wit".

Susan Sontag was an American novelist, screenwriter, director, playwright, essayist, and activist. Among her awards are the National Book Award for In America and the National Book Critics Circle Award for On Photography.

Sontag's other works include the dramatic play Alice in Bed, the novel I, Etcetera, a collection of essays called AIDS and Its Metaphors, and the comedic film Zelig.

Magdalen Nabb was an English author of both adult and children's fiction. Her most popular works may be those of the Guarnaccia series, which center around the character Marshal Guarnaccia. The books of the series are set in Tuscany and usually center around crimes.

Nabb's children's books include The Enchanted Horse, whose royalties, as her website says, "go to the Brooke Hospital for Animals"; and the Josie Smith series.

An Epic Magazine Update -- Tigers, Fashion, and Valentine's Crafts

by belgianchocolate, Flickr.comby belgianchocolate, Flickr.com
This magazine update is truly epic, folks. Our magazine "in" box is swamped -- and I mean completely flooded -- with new magazines for all.

For the kiddos:
Zoobies -- This one's all about tigers. Adorable and fierce!
Iguana -- Cuentos, poemas, leyendas, y articulos. En Espanol, claro.
Scholastic Math -- The boys of Big Time Rush lead you through some painless problems.

For the teens:
Cicada -- Creative writing for teens, by teens.
WWE Magazine -- Wrestler Kaval tells all. Or at least some.
Lucky -- Going shopping? Find out what's in now! Before you perpetrate some serious fashion crimes on your friends.

And for the parental units:
Family Fun -- Valentine's Day crafts!
Book Links -- Multicultural literature. Hey, that sounds familiar.

With so many new magazines it's almost hard to know where to start. Dive in!

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