Naturalization: A Step To Citizenship With Attorney Ruby Robinson

Wednesday February 12, 2014: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Malletts Creek Branch: Program Room AB

Are you, or is someone in your family, one of the 140,000-plus lawful permanent residents living in Michigan who are eligible to naturalize today? Did you want to begin the steps to become a citizen? What are your waiting for?

Ruby Robinson, a staff attorney with the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center (MIRC), will be providing an informational session on the benefits of and requirements for naturalization, along with the process. There is no better time than right now to learn about or apply for naturalization and begin the steps to become a citizen. Following the presentation, Mr. Robinson will be available to answer your questions!

Ruby Robinson is an attorney with the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center (MIRC), a resource center for advocates seeking equal justice for Michigan's immigrants. MIRC works to build a thriving Michigan where immigrant communities are fully integrated and respected.

Happy Polish American Heritage Month!

Cześć!

Celebrate Polish American Heritage Month (ongoing throughout October) at the AADL! This annual event was first started in 1981 and celebrates Polish history, culture and pride, as well as the many achievements of Polish Americans. Whether or not you have Polish heritage, participating in Polish American Heritage Month is fun and easy. Listen to traditional Polish fiddle music by the Karol Stoch Band and try your hand at some Polish recipes. Kids may enjoy hearing ancient Polish fables and folktales read aloud to them, too.

The library also has many books written in Polish in our World section, as well as books and CDs to help you learn and master the Polish language, whether you are an interested beginner or an out-of-practice native speaker. Try Colloquial Polish: the complete course for beginners, or Mastering Polish with 2 audio CDs, which also comes with a Polish-English dictionary.

For information about Polish history in Michigan, read about the first Polish people to settle in Detroit in Detroit’s Polenia, by Cecile Wendt Jensen. You can also learn about the contributions Polish people have made to Michigan culture and about the attraction that many Polish people feel to our state in Poles in Michigan, by Dennis Badaczewski.

Happy Polish American Heritage Month, and Miłego dnia!

Thinking of Becoming a U.S. Citizen?

If you are, classes will start soon at Jewish Family Services. This robust curriculum includes class instruction on Preparing for the Citizenship Test, Civics-based English Language Instruction and U.S. Government & History Lessons. Registration begins April 16th. For more information contact Nicole Graham-Lusher, Citizenship Program Coordinator: 734-769-0209 or nicole@jfsannarbor.org.

Operation Pedro Pan

This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of the airlift that eventually brought 14,000 unaccompanied children from Cuba to this country. While Miami celebrates with a Conference and Fiesta, you can read the fictional story, based on the author's own experiences, of 3 brothers who were evacuated from Cuba in 1961. History comes alive through dazzling use of visual imagery and humor, which ranges from light to dark. For younger readers, Kiki: a Cuban Boy's Adventures in America, tells the story of an 8 year old "Pedro Pan" who encounters his first American puzzle, the automatic door; meets new animals, such as the raccoon; and is frightened by a ghost on what he later learns is Halloween.

Here's a link to the Official National Charitable organization founded in 1991 by the former unaccompanied Cuban children. It was created to fulfill the Pledge of Thanksgiving given in 1990, "in which we honor the sacrifice of our parents and this noble nation that welcomed us, and the person that made it all possible, Monsignor Bryan O. Walsh. We felt it was our duty to pay back the kindness by helping today's needy children...."

So I Come to America: Detroit Pre-World War I Immigrants

So I Come to America: Detroit Pre-World War I ImmigrntsSo I Come to America: Detroit Pre-World War I Immigrnts

The exhibit So I Come to America tells the story of pre-World War I immigrants through documentary photographs and text panels. Between 1980 and 1983, Robert Gordon interviewed and photographed 50 Detroit area immigrants who came to the US prior to the outbreak of WWI in 1914. Join us Wednesday, September 22 from 7:00-8:30 PM at the Downtown Library where Dr. Gordon will discuss the compelling stories behind the immigrant subjects used in his exhibit. His work will be exhibited in the Multi-Purpose Room of the Downtown Library through October 14.

U.S. Citizenship: An Overview

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Are you interested in becoming a U.S. Citizen or want to learn about the process? Join us this Thursday, February 18 at 7:00 pm at our Traverwood Branch to hear Tracy Schauff, Esq. from the International Center at the University of Michigan. She will highlight the steps it takes to become a U.S. citizen, as well as what the International Center at U of M does.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #167

In Repeat After Me*, (Ann Arbor native) Rachel DeWoskin, author of the laugh-out-loud funny and poignant Foreign Babes in Beijing: behind the scenes of a new China impresses readers and critics alike with her debut novel of modern China and one American girl's struggle to find herself there.

This complex love story of cultural intersection begins with Aysha Silvermintz and recent immigrant Chen Da Ge, a sporadic and moody student assigned to her ESL class. Under the pretense of helping him gain citizenship, they marry.

The story picks up 13 years later with Aysha living in Beijing with her daughter, immersing them both in the daily life of their adopted home, and struggling to make sense of the mystery that was Chen. "A tender story of manic love and loss, this is a heartbreaking and uplifting novel with memorably off-kilter leads".

"DeWoskin demonstrates a smart, sophisticated literary agility", .... (her) firsthand knowledge of China, its language, and its traditions, as well as life in New York City, and her characters live and breathe". * = Starred reviews.

Click here to watch Rachel DeWoskin on her experiences living in China, a presentation at the Ann Arbor District Library.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #124

A Map of Home* by Ann Arbor author Randa Jarrar hits the bookstores today.

Critics are calling this fiction debut “sparkling”, “intimate, perceptive and very, very funny”. It’s the story of Nidali, an audacious Muslim girl (with a Greek-Egyptian mother and a Palestinian father) who grows up in Kuwait, Egypt and Texas.
As citizens of the world, this family weathered some harrowing experiences that were even funny and wacky at times, but it is Jarrar’s handling of adolescent angst - "stifling parental expectations, precarious friendships, sensuality and first love; and her exhilarating voice and flawless timing that make this a standout”.

You can find Randa Jarrar's profile in myspace. She will be at Shaman Drum on September 15th, at 7:30 p.m., one of only two Michigan stops on her fall book tour.

* = Starred reviews

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #121

Wendy Lee's accomplished debut Happy Family* explores the immigrant experience and what it means to belong.

Hua Wu exchanges proverty in Fuzhou with loneliness and back-breaking restaurant work in New York City. Meeting Jane Templeton and her adopted Chinese daughter, Lily, seems a stroke of good fortune, especially when she was asked to nanny. But things are not quite what they seem...

Fans of Gish Jen's Mona in the Promised Land, and National Book Award winner Ha Jin's latest - A Free Life will find Wendy's debut a compelling read.

Wendy Lee is a graduate of Stanford University and New York University’s Creative Writing Program. She lives in New York City.

* = Starred Reviews

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