Don't Try This At Home!

picklespickles

History can be dangerous ... even in a cookbook. The Ann Arbor Cooks website features thousands of recipes from vintage Ann Arbor cookbooks. But not all of them have stood the test of time health-wise. We strongly discourage you from trying out many of the pickling or jams & jellies recipes because they don't include enough direction for the novice cook or up-to-date sterilizing information. The Blitz Torte on the other hand looks heavenly.

50 Years and 5 Million Miles In the Making

Apollo InsigniaApollo Insignia

Plus never before seen footage from extraterrestrial film that had to be taken out of NASA's liquid nitrogen storage! How many movies can boast that? Today, In the Shadow of the Moon opens at the Michigan Theater. In the 1960s, 400,000 people joined forces to show what the human race can achieve when we work together. They did the impossible--they sent Man to the Moon and safely returned our brave tour guides to Earth. And they achieved this goal in under a decade! Want more info on the Apollo Missions? AADL has it.
Not going to go see the movie because you think the moon landings were hoaxes? Buzz Aldrin's fist will certainly tell you otherwise!

ALA Announces this year's We the People Bookshelf

We the People ImageWe the People Image

The American Library Association has just announced this year’s theme for their annual We the People Bookshelf. The Bookshelf is a collection of titles for children in grades K-12 that deal with a specific theme in American History. This year’s books explore the meaning of the phrase “Created Equal.” Among the list are books like the Ugly Duckling and Flowers for Algernon that relate the often fraught experiences of those who don’t quite fit in, and others like Virginia Hamilton’s classic Many Thousand Gone, which chronicles the hardships and triumphs experienced by black Americans from slavery to the ratification of the 13th amendment in the 1860s. The Library owns almost every title on the list.

My favorite part about the We the People Bookshelf is the artwork. Artist and illustrator Julie Paschkis has created a lively, colorful series of posters that celebrate American History without beating the viewer over the head with patriotism, more Johnny Appleseed than “these colors don’t run.” Last year’s image, which featured Uncle Sam gleefully whizzing by on a bicycle, was especially playful and fun. Happy thinking!

Tour Washtenaw County's Heritage

mascotmascot

Crank up the Model A or the hybrid and discover our county's history on one of the Washtenaw County Heritage Tours. Download the beautiful full-color brochures that are packed with historical information, pictures and maps designed to take you back in time and get you back home effortlessly. The Ann Arbor District Libray's online Local History Collection will provide even more avenues for exploration.

Tracks, Trails and Tales in Michigan

deerdeer

The beauty of the woods, the pull of the camp, the challenge of the hunt have been part of Michigan history since man first set foot here thousands of years ago. A-Hunting We Will Go: Deer Hunting in Michigan opens Aug. 4 at the Michigan Historical Museum in Lansing. The exhibit will tell the story of deer hunting in Michigan, with a glimpse at its beginnings and a focus on its development into the widespread pastime it is today. Hunters will have the opportunity to add their own buck-bagging stories to Michigan's whitetail lore, as the Michigan Oral History Association will invite hunters to share their personal accounts of hunting at the exhibit.

Antarctica is more than cool!

In anticipation of the Library's program on Antarctica this Wednesday, July 11, the following three books may be of interest:

Scott of the Antarctic: A Life of Courage and Tragedy by David Crane. A biography of Robert Falcon Scott and his attempts to be the first to reach the South Pole only to be foiled by a Norwegian, Amundsen, who had arrived a month earlier. Scott and his crew perished in a storm. Excerpts from Scott's diaries and photos enrich the text.

Much ado about black swans

Fans of quirky business books, rejoice! In the vein of Malcolm Gladwell's The Tipping Point and Blink and James Surowiecki's The Wisdom of Crowds comes Nassim Taleb's The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable. The title already ranks #2 on Amazon's business bestseller list.

Like Gladwell and Surowiecki's thought-provokers, The Black Swan starts with a simple concept - that big, society-altering events are unpredictable - and shows how this concept affects business, history, and predicting the vagaries of the market. Not surprisingly, things like markets and history don't move in easy-to-spot patterns, so we have to come to expect the unexpected.

Also, check out The Long Tail author Chris Anderson's thoughts on Amazon.com.

A pleasant walk across the falls

On June 30, 1859, Charles Blondin, a French acrobat and aerialist whose real name was Jean Francois Gravelet walked across Niagara Falls on a tightrope. The crowd was estimated at more than 25,000. He walked across the Falls several other times, once blindfolded, another time carrying a wheelbarrow, once carrying a man on his back and even once on stilts. Blondin was born February 28, 1824 in St. Omer, France.

VERLANDER!! VaVaVoom

verlanderverlander

As in no-hitter, no-way were they getting on base, no-way was Ordonez missing that final catch. 12, count 'em, 12 strikeouts for Justin Verlander in the first home game Detroit Tigers no-hitter since Virgil Truck's in 1952 (Truck had 2 no-hitters that season.) Is Verlander a future Hall of Famer? We could go on. Heck, let's go on ...

President Ford Honored

fordford

The United States Post Office has unveiled a new postage stamp honoring President Gerald Ford. The stamp will be issued nationwide on August 31st. and a special stamp dedication ceremony will take place on that date at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum in Grand Rapids.

Syndicate content