Dia De La Familia Latina

Latino FamLatino Fam

The excitement will be Sunday October 6th at the downtown library of AADL, as we unite with The U of M Comprehensive Cancer Center to bring Dia de la Familia Latina. This event is aimed at raising awareness of cancer & other health issues among Latinos. We will be featuring the countries of Argentina and Brazil This informational activity - which takes place during National Hispanic Heritage Month - will include health information and resources from local community agencies & organizations that serve Hispanics and Latinos. There will also be fun crafts & activities for children as well as refreshments and entertainment for all! Join us Sunday from 2:00-5:00 pm!

Benjamin Alire Saenz makes history -- he is the first Latino to win the PEN/Faulkner literary award

Benjamin Alire Saenz, a novelist from Texas, has become the first Latino to win the prestigious 2013 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction for his collection of short stories, Everything Begins and Ends at the Kentucky Club (on order). Set along the border between the U.S. and Mexico, near the Rio Grande, Saenz's stories focus on the people who live and work along Avenida Juarez.

Saenz is no stranger to awards. Among the honors he has collected over the years as a poet and a novelist are the Lannan Literary Award for Poetry in 1993 and the Southwest Book Award in 1996, given by Border Regional Library Association, for Carry Me Like Water. 1995.

Saenz, 58, was born in New Mexico. A former Catholic priest, he is now the Chairman of Creative Writing at the University of Texas, El Paso. This latest honor comes with a $15,000 check.

Teen Stuff: Aristotle & Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

I’ve declared 2013 the year of reading, and I’ve been on a mad tear reading a lot of young adult fiction, and so far Aristotle & Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, by poet Benjamin Alire Sáenz, has been my favorite. It is beautifully written, is magically captivating, and I read it in a day.

In January the book won several awards at the Youth Media Awards including a coveted Printz Honor Award, the Stonewall Award, and the Belpré Award.

15 year old Angel Aristotle Mendoza (Ari) is practically an only child with two older sisters and a ghost of a brother who has been in prison for as long as Ari can remember. It’s hard for Ari growing up in a quiet house with so much unspoken regarding his brother and his dad’s past in Vietnam. He has no friends until one day at the community pool he meets a kid named Dante Quintana when he offers to teach Ari how to swim. The boys spend forever laughing when they realize their names are Dante and Aristotle and an immediate bond is formed, just in time for summer.

While they form a strong friendship, Dante's family life is very different from Ari’s. His father is a professor and he and Dante are forever reading and discussing books. It’s not long before Ari gets in on the action as well. The self-assured Dante talks in his unusual way and draws, Ari is an angry sort of quiet and listens, and the boys read and swim and have summer teen adventures, until one day tragedy strikes. What will happen to their friendship as their lives begin to change? It’s a touching, coming of age story about friendship and loyalty, figuring out who you are, discovering family secrets, dealing with tragedy, and just trying to get by in this Universe.

Hands-On Science Fun!

Science experiments mulit-culturalScience experiments mulit-cultural

Join us on Thursday, October 4th at 6:30 pm for this Hands On Science Workshop. Learn some science experiments and watch some cool demos based on traditional and new concepts in science and engineering. Explore the "fun" side of science and engineering. Presented by the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) and Proyecto Avance: Latino Mentoring Association (PALMA) from the University of Michigan. Be sure to bring your curiosity and energy for a night guaranteed to make you interested in becoming a scientist or engineer!

This event is for Grades K - 8. Parents and caregivers are also welcome.

Operation Pedro Pan

This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of the airlift that eventually brought 14,000 unaccompanied children from Cuba to this country. While Miami celebrates with a Conference and Fiesta, you can read the fictional story, based on the author's own experiences, of 3 brothers who were evacuated from Cuba in 1961. History comes alive through dazzling use of visual imagery and humor, which ranges from light to dark. For younger readers, Kiki: a Cuban Boy's Adventures in America, tells the story of an 8 year old "Pedro Pan" who encounters his first American puzzle, the automatic door; meets new animals, such as the raccoon; and is frightened by a ghost on what he later learns is Halloween.

Here's a link to the Official National Charitable organization founded in 1991 by the former unaccompanied Cuban children. It was created to fulfill the Pledge of Thanksgiving given in 1990, "in which we honor the sacrifice of our parents and this noble nation that welcomed us, and the person that made it all possible, Monsignor Bryan O. Walsh. We felt it was our duty to pay back the kindness by helping today's needy children...."

Literacy Series -- Multicultural Literacy

by neokainpak, Flickr.comby neokainpak, Flickr.com

"Multicultural literacy" means an understanding of the similarities and differences between cultures, along with the understanding that one's values, customs and beliefs are influenced by one's own culture. The U. S. has been a multicultural nation since its birth. With cultural and ethnic diversity projected to rise over the next 50 years, and technology and business increasingly connecting the U. S. to other countries, now is the time for young people to become culturally literate!

Fortunately, reading can be a great way to explore the world through the eyes of people who are very different from you. Here are some suggestions for multicultural reading:

1. Read books in other languages (if you can!) -- check out our World Language collection. Of course, if you don't already speak another language, you can learn one!

2. Read books about other countries.

3. Read folktales from other cultures -- you can learn a lot about another culture from their folklore. And folktales are fun to read!

4. Read about America's immigrants -- Try the World Book of America's Multicultural Heritage to learn the long history and contributions of immigrants in America.

Multicultural books for young readers:
Check out "Books With a View", a list of books for children and young adults featuring characters from around the world.
Across Cultures: A Guide to Multicultural Literature for Children
Breaking Boundaries With Global Literature
Crossing Boundaries With Children's Books
The New Press Guide to Multicultural Resources for Young Readers
The World Through Children's Books

Multicultural Resources for Parents:
Multicultural Manners
A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism
Raising the Rainbow Generation

Danilo Perez 21st Century Dizzy Project

Last night I had the opportunity to hear Danilo Perez and his six band members play at the Hill Auditorium. And this Grammy award winning jazz performer certainly did not disappoint with a tribute to his mentor, Dizzy Gillespie. If you can't make it to their Chicago concert in late May, checkout AADL's copy of his award winning CD, 'Motherland,' and his work with the Wayne Shorter Quartet.

Dance Performance for Day of the Dead

MoyocoyaniMoyocoyani

The Ballet Folklorico Moyocoyani Izel will perform at the Downtown Library on Sunday, November 1, 2009 from 2:00-2:45pm in celebration of Day of the Dead. The exciting dances and authentic costumes will be a thrill to see! The performance is in celebration of The Day of the Dead (El Dia de los Muertos), a holiday that commemorates the wonderful memories of our lost loved ones. The holiday is often observed with bright colors, memorial displays for those we have lost, and yummy confections. Similar holidays are celebrated throughout the world.

SPECIAL NOTE: DUE TO POPULAR DEMAND - AN ADDITIONAL PERFORMANCE FOR THIS EVENT HAS BEEN ADDED AND WILL OCCUR FROM 3:30 - 4:15 PM ON SUNDAY.

Celebrate "Cinco de Mayo"

Today, May 5 is also known as Cinco de Mayo, the holiday commemorating the victory of the Mexican army over the French in the town of Puebla, Mexico on May 5, 1862. The day is celebrated mainly in the town of Puebla and in many places in the U.S., especially cities with significant Latino populations. People participate in parades, eat indigenous foods and dress in traditional Mexican clothes. The day is often confused with Mexico's day of independence which is September 16.

To celebrate in Ann Arbor, head to the Firefly Club where a dj will spin Salsa music and you can indulge at the taco bar. Festivities begin at 9 p.m. Or check out books and cds from our collection and whip up your own Mexican specialties to the tune of your favorite Latin music.

Syndicate content