Hands-On Lab: Finding Funding for A College Education - November 6 & 7

Wed. & Thurs. November 6-7, 2013 |7:00 pm to 8:30 pm | Pittsfield Branch: Training Center

This event is intended for teens (grade 9 and up) and adults

UM Foundations and Grants Librarian Dr. Karen Downing and French Studies Librarian, Jennifer Bonnet present a workshop for high schoolers, their parents, and anyone seeking funding for college.

Learn about a variety of specialized Web resources, how to articulate a plan of study, identify potential funders, and apply for relevant educational grants.

We will also compare free Web resources and subscription-based services (U-M pays the subscription and provides free access). Participants will have time to search for scholarships during the session.

UM Professor, Dr. Susan Murphy, is one of this year's MacArthur Foundation 'Geniuses'

This morning, Dr. Susan Murphy, the H.E. Robbins Professor of Statistics and Professor of Psychiatry at The University of Michigan, was awarded one of two dozen new MacArthur Fellows,

Dr. Murphy's current focus is on adaptive intervention, which involves developing plans to work with patients who have chronic or relapsing illnesses (such as, substance abuse or depression) where effective courses of treatment are constantly adjusted for maximum benefit.

Novelist Karen Russell is another new Fellow. The first story in her debut collection, St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves (2006) served as the basis for her much acclaimed first novel, Swamplandia (2011), set in the Everglades and narrated by 13-year-old Ava. Swamplandia was one of three finalists for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. Alas, no award in that category was given last year, due to the lack of the minimum required number of votes.

These "Genius Awards", as they are affectionately known, come with no strings attached. The Fellows are free to spend the money as they wish. This year, the Geniuses received a raise. The formerly half-million dollar reward has been bumped to $625,000, paid out yearly for five years.

For a complete list of the MacArthur Foundation Fellows for the Class of 2013, check here.

Born into Brothels

This is a stirring documentary about “the resiliency of childhood and the restorative power of art.” Born into Brothels follows several young children who live in the red light district of Calcutta. Ross Kauffman and Zana Briski collaborated on piecing together this beautiful film. Briski formed an interest in the children living in the red light district while living in a brothel and photographing the woman. The interest blossomed into a desire to provide the children of these women with cameras and some basic instruction on photography. The result is a fascinating insight into a life that is foreign to many of us. Many of the children’s photographs are highlighted and are a beautiful depiction of a difficult life. You cannot help but be uplifted by the laughter of these kids as they run through the streets taking pictures. One particularly unforgettable segment of the film is when Briski takes the children to the beach in order to photograph the surroundings. Their excitement is palpable and the resulting photographs are striking.

The beauty of this documentary is not only in the aesthetic appeal of the pictures, but also the impact that photography has on the children’s lives. In an atmosphere of poverty and illegal sex trafficking, the hope that is generated from empowering the children in this environment is inspiring. Art and education are two very powerful things and Born into Brothels chronicles providing access to both.

The film won the 77th Academy Awards for Best Documentary and the film’s website Kids with Cameras (KWC) is definitely worth visiting. You can view the kid’s photographs as well as get updates on what they went on to do after the film. KWC has since completed a merge with another nonprofit organization Kids with Destiny. This merger has resulted in the realization of a KWC project Hope House which is expected to be completed later this year.

If you like Born into Brothels, you may also like Wade in the Water, Children, a documentary on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina told from the perspective of the children who lived through it.

Ed "Hizzoner" Koch, former mayor of New York City, has died

Ed Koch, whose highest-profile job as three-term mayor of New York City made him a national figure, died early this morning at New York-Presbyterian Columbia Hospital.

After serving in the Army during WW II, Koch began his political career in 1952 campaigning for Adlai Stevenson who lost the run for president to Dwight Eisenhower. Koch was elected five times to the U.S. House of Representatives, beginning in 1969. During his fifth term, he ran for Mayor of New York City, beating in the primary such Democratic heavyweights as Bella Abzug, Mario Cuomo, and Abe Beame, New York City's first Jewish Mayor (1974-1978). Koch won his first of three mayoral terms in the 1977 general election against three opponents.

Koch's first two terms as mayor were very successful. His feisty personality, blunt talk, and political savvy brought NYC out of bankruptcy and made great strides in cleaning up the City, adding 200,000 housing units and drastically reducing the number of abandoned buildings. The start of his third term was marred by a stunning number of scandals involving key City leaders and the tanking of the stock market in 1987.

After his career as Mayor, Koch immediately launched himself into a dozen new directions. He wrote 17 books, including his 2000 I'm Not Done Yet: Keeping at It, Remaining Relevant, and Having the Time of My Life. He was a popular talk radio show contributor, a TV and silver screen actor (The Muppets Take Manhattan (2011) and The First Wives Club (1998)), a columnist and critic (film and restaurant) for several print venues, and lecturer.

Due to his failing health, he missed the Tuesday night premiere of Neil Barsky's documentary, Koch.

Mr. Koch, who died of congestive heart failure, was 88.

Hands-On Lab: Find Funding for a College Education

Monday, October 29 OR Tuesday, October 30 | 7:00-8:30 PM | Pittsfield Branch Training Center

UM Foundations and Grants Librarian Dr. Karen Downing and French Studies Librarian, Jennifer Bonnet present a hands-on workshop for high schoolers, their parents, and anyone seeking funding for college.

Karen will show you how to develop a strategy and introduce a variety of Web resources and several key Internet tools, including the Foundation Center and the Foundation Directory Online. Free Web resources and subscription-based services (U-M pays the subscription and provides free access) will be discussed and compared. Participants will have time to search for scholarships during the session.

Registration is required for this session and begins October 15 online at aadl.org, by phone 327-4555, or in person at any Information Desk.

Seeking Funding for College?

Finding Funding for a College Education | Wednesday, October 19 | 7:00-8:30 PM | Pittsfield

Want a college education but don’t know how you’ll pay for it? Get the funding scoop from University of Michigan Foundation and Grants Librarian Dr. Karen Downing. She will show you how to develop a strategy and introduce a variety of Web resources and several key Internet tools, including the Foundation Center and the Foundation Directory Online.

Finding Grant Funding For Community Nonprofits

This event, which has two sessions (Monday September 12, 2011: 10:30 am to 12:30 pm & Tuesday September 13, 2011: 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm -- both at Pittsfield Branch: Training Center) is now full.

Due to the large demand for this program, we will be offering this again, in a lecture format, in the Downtown Library Multipurpose Room on Monday, December 12 from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm. There will be no registration for this December session and there should be room for all.

The Philadelphia Bequest: Ben Franklin

Gift of MoneyGift of Money When Benjamin Franklin passed away on April 17, 1790, he left Boston and Philadelphia $2,000. He'd saved this money while he was Governor of Pennsylvania (1785 to 1788). The money was not to be distributed until 200 years after his death. In 1990, the bequest was worth $6.5 million and Philadelphia's portion of the trust was $2 million. There were several ideas about what should be done with the money: apply the money to government deficits, build low-income housing, gift the money to a university, or create scholarships for students who want to study a trade. After some debate, the money was shared between The Franklin Institute and several community foundations like the Williamsport-Lycoming Foundation that helps fund technical education scholarships. Although Benjamin Franklin left the decision of how to spend the money for the city, he suggested the money should "provide funds for young artificers". Are you interested in researching grants and foundations? The Ann Arbor District Library can help, just click here.

Nonprofits: NEW helping boards make a difference

Check out five (5!) workshops being offered this winter and spring by Nonprofit Enterprise at Work (NEW). On March 9, there is "Board Member Training: Serving on a Nonprofit Board," followed March 17 by "Your Board Members as Ambassadors and Fundraisers." Later in March will be "Nonprofit Training: Building Your Board" and "Spring Into Service: A Board Matching Event for Nonprofit Organizations." Finally in early April, a workshop is scheduled on "Starting Off Right: Board Member Orientation." Details are here. Don't forget AADL also has a collection of nonprofit resources on the second floor of the downtown library.

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