AADL's College Night

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Finding the right college and getting admitted is easily a multi-year project for teens and their parents. Make the process easier by listening to advice from some local experts. College application experts John Boshoven, Community High’s premier college prep counselor, and Debbie Merion, founder of Essay Coaching will be joined by performance coach Geraldine Markel at this event for parents and teens. Seating will be limited, so arrive early.

College Night | Tuesday, September 28 | 7:00-8:30 PM | Downtown Multipurpose Room| Grade 9-Adult

Literacy Series -- Nature Literacy

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Naturalistic Intelligence is the most recently identified of Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences. A rather under-appreciated form of intelligence in our technological modern world, Naturalistic Intelligence consists of the ability to recognize patterns, relationships and categories in nature, essentially, the ability to “read” nature and be “nature literate.”

Today, we tend to live farther and farther from nature, although research suggests that access to nature, and even dirt itself may be vital to human health and happiness. Few would argue that nature is essential to human survival -- and we need nature literate people to give us more balanced ways of living on earth.

So what can you do to foster nature literacy? Here are some easy (and fun!) suggestions:

1. Visit a natural history museum: U of M’s Exhibit Museum of Natural History is a great local resource – and guess what? We have a Museum Adventure Pass!

2. Go on a nature walk: Ann Arbor has many excellent parks available for this purpose – Matthei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum for example. And look! We have a Museum Adventure Pass for them. Also, if you act fast, you can take a hike at Greenview Park with us on September 13th.

3. Feed the birds: What better way to observe wildlife than in the comfort of your own backyard? Check out The Bird Lover's Ultimate How-To Guide for some bird feeding and watching tips. To see more birds, and other types of wildlife, too, check out the Howell Nature Center. Oh yeah, and we have a Museum Adventure Pass for them, too.

4. Read about famous naturalists: Like Jane Goodall, George Washington Carver, Rachel Carson, John Muir and Charles Darwin, to name a few.

5. Explore nature yourself!
Try these books for tips:
Hands on Nature
Sharing Nature With Children
Teaching Kids to Love the Earth

September is Library Card Sign-Up Month

A library card is one of the most important cards you can carry in your wallet and September is the month to celebrate it! The library offers a multitude of educational, fun, and interesting resources and is filled with staff who are eager and willing to help you use them. Never had a library card? Has it been a while since you've last visited us? That's ok! There's always time to come in and discover all that we have to offer. Do you already have a library card? Take some time to see just what is possible here and you may learn something new.

So, just what can you do with an AADL library card?

*Check out some art. Are you only living in town for a short period of time and don't want to constantly move your favorite pieces of art? Or simply can't make up your mind about the decor in your living room? The AADL has a large selection of art prints available for check-out to bring a little life to your home.

*Start a book club. The library offers Book Clubs to Go, which include 10 copies of a selected book and author information, discussion questions, and tips for starting a book club.

*Can't find the book you want at the AADL? You can request an inter-library loan and if another library in Michigan (or even in another state!) has the book available for request, we will bring it to the AADL for you to borrow.

*Want to know how much energy one of your appliances is using? We have energy meters available for check out!

*If English isn't your first language or you want to immerse yourself in a foreign language, check out our large selection of world language offerings.

*You can visit local museums by checking out a Museum Adventure Pass.

*You can also check out a book, a CD, a DVD, or Blu-Ray.

Interested in getting a library card? Just bring in a photo ID, proof of residence, and desire to learn and have fun to any one of our locations.

If you are not eligible for a card, you still have access to our free wireless, public internet stations, all of our events, and computer classes. And, as always, please feel free to speak to any library employee you see or call (734) 327-4200 if you have any questions about what the library can do for you.

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Extended ESL Class Registration

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The Ann Arbor Public Schools Adult Education has extended registration for ESL classes. Enrollments will be accepted through Monday, August 30th. Students must be 19 years old and have a passport with a visa, a green card or a Social Security card. ESL classes start Tuesday, Sept. 7, and run every weekday, Monday through Friday. There are no night ESL classes. You do not have to live in the Ann Arbor Public Schools district to take classes. Those interested in registration should call 997-1250 or visit the AAPS ESL website.

Back to Schools

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If you're wondering what going back to school looked like around here decades ago, here's the original Ann Arbor High School, circa 1894; its ruins (from a fire), 1904; and the "new" Ann Arbor High School, rebuilt in 1907.

There's also the old Fourth Ward School, built in 1867 on Division St, which was replaced by the building that eventually became Community High School. And here are the students at the Fifth Ward school, c. 1880.

There's also the old University School of Music from 1894...and the Di Gregorio Driving School in 1974.

Registration for fall GED and ESL classes

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Registration for the Ann Arbor Public Schools Adult Education programs, including GED preparation and English as a Second Language classes, is taking place in the weeks before school begins.

Those interested in Adult Education classes do not have to live in the Ann Arbor Public Schools district to take classes. Registration takes place in Room 206 at Stone High School.

Literacy Series -- Numeracy

Numeracy is to math what literacy is to reading -- understanding the components that make up the mathematical "language." Numeracy involves understanding the different kinds of numbers -- decimals, fractions, percentages, etc. -- and being able to use them to solve problems.

If math was not your favorite subject, don't worry -- encouraging numeracy in your child is surprisingly easy. Here are some quick tips:

1. Drive -- How far have you gone, and how far do you still need to go? How fast are you going and how soon will you get there? And, a scary question, how much will it cost to fill the gas tank?

2. Shop -- Which product is the better deal? How much does each product cost per ounce? If you still use real money, how much will your change be?

3. Cook -- Double or halve a recipe. How do you change the measurements? Read The Math Chef by Joan D'Amico for more ideas.

4. Play Games -- Let your child keep score when you play games or sports. Dominoes and card games are good for recognizing and matching numbers, while Battleship is a great introduction to graphing.

5 Pay Attention -- How do you use math in your life? Share your daily calculations with your child.

For more tips and ideas, try these resources:
This page from the Peel District School Board has several pages of tips -- scroll down to where it says "Help Your Child Boost Math Skills."
The US Department of Education provides its own list of activities for preschool through grade 5.

Cindy Neuschwander's "Sir Cumference" books are a great way to learn about geometry.
For fans of One-Minute Mysteries, try 65 Short Stories You Solve With Math!.
Amy Axelrod and Greg Tang, who have written many, many books about math.

Literacy Series -- Reading Aloud

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Do you remember storytime, and how fun it was when your kindergarten teacher gathered everyone on the rug to listen to Curious George? Although you probably didn't know it at the time, whoever read aloud to you was doing one of best things we know of to support the development of life-long reading. Here are some tips and ideas to help make reading aloud a part of your own family's routine.

1. Set time aside in your day -- Don't worry, you don't have to read aloud for a long time in order to reap the rewards. Ten minutes a day is fine, or even less for the especially squirmy baby or toddler. The key is regularity, for example, always reading aloud before bedtime.

2. Make read-aloud time fun -- Choose books you and your child both enjoy. Let your child bring their favorite toy along to read-aloud time. Use silly voices and sound effects. Eat popcorn or other snacks. Reading aloud should not be a chore!

3. Get your child involved -- Ask questions about the book (or the pictures, for younger readers). Ask your child to predict what they think is going to happen next. Talk about what you liked and didn't like, as well as how the book relates to events in your child's life. When your child is old enough, let her read to you.

4. Don't get stuck on novels and picture books -- There are all sorts of things out there to bring to read-aloud time. Nonfiction, magazines, newspaper articles, poetry, and even song lyrics are all great options for reading aloud.

For more information and tips about reading aloud and encouraging reading, try Reading Magic by Mem Fox, Baby Read-Aloud Basics by Caroline Blakemore and The Read-Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease -- or take a look at these great resources:
Reading is Fundamental
The National Institute for Literacy
Read Aloud America

Also, feel free to come on down to our summer playgroup and storytime sessions, starting June 21st.

Language Learning Collection

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Whether you are starting to learn another language, brushing up on one, or need some help with your English, the Ann Arbor District Library’s Language Learning collection is here to help. With materials for adults and children and over 60 languages to choose from, you will be sure to find a variety of materials to assist in your learning experience. The adult Language Learning collection at Downtown is located on the 3rd floor while the youth materials are in the Youth department, 1st floor; at other branches the Language Learning collection is located within the non-fiction 400 call # range. See below for how to search in the catalog for this collection.

Registration for AAPS Adult Education GED Summer Program

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Ann Arbor Public Schools Adult Education’s Summer GED Preparation has started, but it is not too late to register for this ten-week, free program. If you are 18 or older and want your GED, come to either the morning (Tuesday and Thursday, 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.) or evening (Monday and Wednesday, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.) class. Both are at Stone School in Room 314. You do not need to call in advance: just arrive on time, attend class and plan to stay and enroll afterward. Classes started the week of June 1st and the deadline for new students to register is Thursday, June 10. Registration for the summer ends that morning. Registration for fall will begin at the end of August. Call 734-997-1250 with any questions.

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