Feb. 5th Morningstar Part 2 Class Canceled; Rescheduled For Feb. 25th at 7pm

MorningstarMorningstar

The February 5th class on Morningstar has been canceled and rescheduled for registered participants for Wednesday, February 25th at 7pm.

Pulp

Pulp Tree

Business news available at the library:
Ann Arbor Area Business Monthly - December
page 9 "The Americans With Disabilities Act - New Amendments Take Effect January 1, 2009" explains the newly expanded definition of a disability
Ann Arbor Business Review - December 18 - 31
page 20 "Data Digest" details patents collected in our area
Crains Detroit Business - December 22 - 28
page 1 "Pfizer purchase cheered" describes how the University of Michigan Medical School may use the site for research

A Little Thanksgiving, Right This Very Minute

telephoningtelephoning

I recently heard about Get Human and thought I’d share it with you today because it is truly worthy of thanksgiving.
A database of over 1500 companies, it tells you exactly what to do to get out of automatic voice mail and reach an actual human being. No more #####9 for extreme frustration—Thank You!!!!!!!!!

The history of South University

mademoisellemademoiselle

This week the Downtown Ann Arbor Historical Street Exhibit will dedicate four new wall displays that tell the story of South University from the late 19th century through today. The displays cover area businesses and images include a wonderful 1898 panorama of the area, Miller's Ice Cream, C-Ted's Standard gas station, Tice's Men's Shop and a glimpse of the home where philosopher and educator John Dewey lived. The dedication will take place Thursday, November 6, at 5:00 p.m. on the corner of South and East University.

Sir John Templeton, Philanthropist and Investor, dies at 95

Sir John Templeton was one of the most interesting people ever to amass an enormous fortune on Wall Street. He was in the forefront in the creation of mutual funds and early on led the way for U.S. investing in foreign markets. In the 1970’s and 80’s if you invested in a mutual fund, very likely it was a Templeton Fund.

He was twelve during the Scopes Trial and lived only 60 miles away from Dayton, TN. Many believe that it launched his lifelong fascination with religion and science and his attempts to reconcile the two.

He established philanthropic organizations and founded the Templeton Prize for “progress in religion” and “research or discoveries.” It is estimated that he gave away $70 million a year to people such as Mother Teresa, Billy Graham, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn, the physicist Freeman Dyson and a host of others.

He authored numerous books on finance and spirituality including Thrift and Generosity: The Joy of Giving, Discovering the Laws of Life and Is Progress Speeding Up?

sir john templetonsir john templeton

Basic Economics

basic economics-sowellbasic economics-sowell

“Investment and speculation,” “government’s role in business,” “money and the banking system,” “inflation,” “capital,” “labor,” “productivity,” “government finance” and “international trade.”

Learn about what makes the world go ‘round!

Dip your toe into this fascinating topic with this lively and well-written book-- Basic Economics: A Common Sense Guide to the Economy by Thomas Sowell.

A lively book about economics? It is possible!

Master basic economic principles such as how governments create monetary policy, inflation, interest rates, how governments regulate businesses and markets, how international trade works and how governments finance themselves.

I promise—it is not boring!!

Suddenly the news makes a lot more sense once the big picture concepts are understood. What is happening to your holdings and potential investments makes a lot more sense too.

Pretty soon you’ll know what CDOs, ETFs, put-call ratios and derivatives are all about.

It pays to know!

Local Car Historian Bob Elton Presents A Brief History of Chrysler Corporation

Monday July 7, 2008: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

The story of Chrysler Corporation is an epic story of bold, ambitious men, horrible mismanagement, bad luck, gritty perseverance and the will to never say die.

Local car historian Bob Elton presents a fascinating introduction to this once great auto empire. This lecture holds particular relevance, considering the current economic outlook facing automakers today.

This event is held in conjunction with the Main Street Area Association’s July 11 Rolling Sculpture Car Show and cosponsored by the Main Street Area Association. Mr. Elton is one of the founders of the Rolling Sculpture Car Show. Check that out this Friday to see some amazing automobiles.

Guerrilla Marketing

The summer doldrums are upon us, but not if you are a consultant, a salesperson or own a business. Now is the time to plan for year-end goals.

Jay Conrad Levinson has written a series of books devoted to Guerrilla Marketing, a term he coined to describe strategies for marketing, advertising and getting more business.
He has compiled many great ideas, some you’ve thought of and lots you probably haven’t.
Have you explored and exploited using inexpensive new technologies to generate new business leads? Want some ideas on generating more referrals? Tried any new prospecting techniques?
The Ann Arbor District Library has several of his books including Guerrilla Marketing, Guerrilla Marketing For The New Millennium and Guerrilla Marketing Weapons.
Pick one up, make someone else mow the lawn, get in a hammock, have some lemonade, then plan your work and work your plan to meet and exceed your year-end goals.
You’ll be glad you did in December!

gorilla onegorilla one

In the News, Give Your View

hearyehearye

Liquor licenses have been in the news of late in Ann Arbor and the City has recently been granted 807 "downtown development area" liquor licenses. The City Council Liquor Committee would like your input on how best to proceed with these new licenses and they're holding a Special Public Meeting, Wednesday, May, 21, 7 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall.

The underlying rationality of your irrationality

Irrationality is big these days. First came Tim Harford's The Logic of life: The rational economics of an irrational world. Next, at the top of Amazon's business bestseller list, comes Predictably irrational: The hidden forces that shape our decisions. Human foibles, apparently, keep a few writers gainfully employed.

Both books helps explain the funny things we do using a field that's been gaining some press lately: behavioral economics. Behavioral economists demonstrate an underlying method of our madness: sure we're irrational, but predictably so. From Harford's chapter on marriage as a "market-based transaction" to Ariely's discussion of why we pay $4.00 for a cup o'Joe, you may be surprised to find out just how logical - and common - your illogical actions can be.

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