A ferrofluid Magnetoscope at the AADL? Come check it out!

MagnetoscopeMagnetoscope

Control powerful magnets and levitate a puddle of ferrofluid in this new hands-on exhibit by inventor, Michael Flynn. Ferrofluid is a nano-engineered oil containing magnetic particles that are only 5 nanometers in diameter. Rapid advancements in nanotechnology are harnessing many other surprising properties from nanoscale physics for use in our normal, full-scale experience. You can learn more about this exhibit at www.FunExhibits.com, and during the month of March you come see it in action at the Downtown AADL!

"Hope" in Dispute - Copyright vs. Fair Use

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Street artist Shepard Fairey who created the famous Hope image of Barack Obama sued The Associated Press, claiming his use of an AP photo in creating the poster did not violate copyright law, because he has dramatically changed the nature of the image and therefore, is protected under the so-called "Fair Use" provisions.

The AP said it is owed credit and compensation for the artist's rendition of the original photo taken by Mannie Garcia who was on assignment for the AP at the National Press Club. (Read the whole story).

Just today, Mannie Garcia discussed on NPR his own legal battle with the AP, claiming the photo was taken while he was working as a freelance photojournalist.

Maybe reading Elizabeth T. Russell’s Art Law Conversations : a surprisingly readable guide for visual artists (2005) might help clear up the muddle? But I doubt it.

BTW...signed originals of both the Hope poster and the Garcia photo have been acquired by the National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C.

Detroit's Healing Work of Art

In 1968 Detroit Receiving Hospital began an art collection designed to provide an environment colorful, attractive, and beneficial to patients, their families, and the hospital staff. Today, that collection includes more than a thousand works of art. The Healing Work of Art : From the Collection of Detroit Receiving Hospital documents this amazing collection, highlighting the diversity of its holdings as well as its history. Detroit Receiving Hospital is home to major sculptures, as well as hundreds of paintings, works on paper, textiles, and crafts. Over the years, the collection has been broadened by the addition of African beadwork, tapestries from the USA, Africa, and Columbia, a site-specific Pewabic tile water fountain, and large photo murals in the Emergency Department. The collection, which continues to grow in scope and quality, retains its original purpose of lightening the burden of illness carried by patients and their families. Art enthusiasts, as well as those interested in Detroit culture and history, will appreciate this book.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #149

Pictures at an Exhibition, a title borrowed from the familiar Mussorgsky's suite for piano, is an impressive debut by novelist Sara Houghteling.

Picture presents a realistic rendering of the world of Parisian art dealers before and after the Nazi occupation. Daniel Berenzon, who represents the likes of Matisse and Picasso in his prestigious Paris gallery flees to the South of France during the Occupation. Upon his return, he finds the gallery burned and the hidden masterpieces gone.

It is Rose Clément (drawn from the real-life Louvre curator Rose Valland, whose documentation helped repatriate thousands of paintings) who heroically aids Max (Daniel's son) in his desperate effort to recover the stolen art. (The 1964 film The Train was inspired by this historical footnote).

A Hopwood Awards winner, Houghteling received her Masters in Fine Arts from the University of Michigan and a Fulbright to study paintings that went missing during the war. Her vivid descriptions of paintings and their power add to the allure of the novel.

Readers interested in the Nazi looting of art treasures across Europe should check out Lynn Nicholas' The Rape of Europa: the fate of Europe's treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War or the documentation at the National Archive on the subject.

Happy Birthday from the Writer's Almanac

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KeillorGarrison
Keillor

Walking to work today, I listened to the podcast of the Writer's Almanac: Garrison Keillor's daily recording of significant events in literary history. I was surprised to learn that today is the birthday of three extraordinary people whose work I appreciate:

1.Ansel Adams: the iconic photographer of the American west. If you've never spent some time with Adams' photographs, check them out in our collection: Ansel Adams : 400 photographs.

2.Kurt Cobain: although I was teenager in the 90's, I only recently came to appreciate the music of Nirvana. Cobain's life ended too soon, but fortunately we still have music like Nirvana Unplugged to enjoy.

3.Robert Altman: probably my favorite film maker. He directed movies unlike anyone else. Of course M*A*S*H and Nashville are probably his most famous films, but I would also recommend Three Women and Popeye, one of the weirdest musicals ever made.

Dispel winter gloom with art

Celebrate the birthday of French artist,Edouard Manet by looking at the Library's collection of not only his work but many of the French Impressionists. Manet was born on January 23, 1832 in Paris, France. He did not consider himself an impressionist in the mode of Renoir or Monet but was often seen by others as the father of French Impressionism.

To find out more about artists, whether from the U.S. or other countries, contemporary or ancient, check out Oxford Art Online which you can access from the Library's online catalog. Click on "Research" at the top of the page. You will need an account to log on. It's easy to set one up. You'll find other great resources there too.

Indoor Winter Activity!

DAMDAM

Each year in January, Detroit turns its attention to design and creativity. In 2009 the Detroit Artists Market will take its own look at design with the DAM Design Show, running January 16 through January 31. This show will look at the entire creative process from concept to design to creation of an artistic and functional piece. Ten designers will take on this process in creating “Chair”. The show will exhibit pieces from their creative process, including concept sketches, scale models, and the finished piece. The DAM Design Show will provide an intimate look into how design “happens”, and results in unique functional pieces. The market is open Tuesday- Saturday from 11 to 6, and admission is free to the public. As a bonus to you, be sure to check out a Museum Adventure Pass before you go and get 10% all purchases!

¡Feliz Cumpleaños Diego!

Diego RiveraDiego Rivera

Today marks the birthday of famed Mexican artist and revolutionary Diego Rivera (1886-1957). Born in Guanajuato in 1886, Rivera showed an interest in art from a young age, and by the time he reached his twenties he had become a well established painter. In 1907, Rivera left Mexico for Europe where he would remain for fourteen years. Rivera was heavily influenced by the Italian Renaissance style of painting known as the fresco form. Upon returning to Mexico, Rivera began using the fresco form in a number of his works. Feeling that it was important to bring art to the people where they lived and worked, Rivera painted murals in public buildings such as universities, hotels, schools, etc. These giant murals often depicted scenes of Mexican history, industrialization, and the worker’s struggle. In the early 1930s Rivera worked on commissions for a number of prominent American businessmen. One of these works included a mural entitled "Detroit Industry" commissioned by Henry Ford to be painted on walls of the Detroit Institute of Art. A tribute to the American industrial worker, the 27 panel mural depicts industrial life in the United States, and that at the Ford Motor Company in particular. Diego was also well known for his marriage to another prominent Mexican artist, Frida Kahlo. For more information on Rivera’s life and works, check out author Anne E. Neimark's biography entitled Diego Rivera : artist of the people. The 2002 film Frida also provides an entertaining view of Diego and Frida's tumultuous marriage. If you are intersted in seeing Rivera's Detroit Industry mural in person, you can check out a pass to the Detroit Institute of Art from the ADDL, for more information visit http://www.detroitadventurepass.org/index.php.

Day With(out) Art

On Monday, December 1, 5 p.m. at the Hussey Room, Michigan League (911 N. University), renowned poet, memoirist, biographer and playwright Honor Moore will present a reading as part of the 2008 Day With(out) Art observance. Her most recent work The Bishop's Daughter: a memoir discusses her father, an Episcopal priest and civil rights activist who struggled with his sexuality. Moore teaches in the graduate writing programs at the New School and Columbia University School of the Arts.

Since 1989, Day With(out) Art is observed as a national day of recognition and mourning in response to the AIDS crisis. Today some 8000 organizations annually come together to acknowledge the devastating toll that HIV and AIDS have taken on the worldwide creative and performing arts communities.

As a museum devoted to fostering and presenting creative expression and to preserving culture memory, University of Michigan Museum of Art has long been committed to participation in this day of remembrance. The event is free and open to the public.

School of Art and Design Accepting Art Submissions

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I've never trusted the letter V, as it's a violent, vacuous vessel with a decidedly violet hue. Now if only I could paint, I'd create a canvas that expresses this synaestesia -- where one sense influences another -- and submit it to the UM School of Art and Design. They're currently seeking submissions in all media for an exhibition called "The Five Senses," where neuroscience meets art. The exhibition, which will run from March 18 - April 3, will be held at their Work : Ann Arbor gallery on State Street, where it will coincide with the Ann Arbor Film Festival's free panels and lectures next year. Submit your sense-ational artwork today.

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