Reveal Your Detroit

Reveal Your Detroit: An Intimate Look at at Great American City is a community engagement project led by the Detroit Institute of Arts.

The Detroit Revealed exhibition at the DIA featured more than fifty works created from 2000 to 2010. The artwork captured a diverse Detroit, featuring urban architecture, urban gardens, community, art, and decay.

Reveal Your Detroit is a community based public art response to the exhibit. The project was a dialog between the museum, established artists and community organizations, asking these questions:

What does your Detroit look like?
How do you want others to see it?

After it was announced in March 2012 the project received over 10,000 images taken with disposable cameras in less than three months. The photographs included in this book are from that lot and are photographs taken with disposable cameras by local residents, and for the most part not hobbyist or professional photographers. Even if you did not visit Detroit Revealed at the DIA this book is a wonderful celebration of collaboration and community and is a positive look at the heart of Detroit: its people.

Art Table: Pop Art!

The next time you’re at the Downtown Library, pop into the Youth Department and check out the new art project at the art table. This month you’ll have the chance to create some POP ART!

Pop art is the art of every day things. This art form works off things in pop culture and mass media. We’ve got crayons, paper and samples to get you started in your own artistic endeavors. And for some books as inspiration, check out these youth titles about pop art.

Youth Nonfiction: The Mad Potter

A new book found on the Art Shelf in the Youth Department downtown is The Mad Potter: George E Ohr, Eccentric Genius. Part of the Ladies Library Collection, The Mad Potter is also an ALA Notable Book, 2014 Sibert Honor, 2014 Best Book of the Year via Booklist, 2014 Best Book of the Year via School Library Journal.

Who was this eccentric genius? He crafted thousands of ceramic sculptures and took them to art fairs and shows but nobody was buying any of this oddly shaped pieces. After his death over 5,000 pots were discovered, and he had boasted that no two were alike. The authors of the award-winning Ballet For Martha have brought us a curious biography about a curious artist. Be sure to also check out their other artist biographies!

Getty Publications Launches Virtual Library With Free Access To Hundreds of Art Titles

Getty Publications launched a Virtual Library, providing free online access to more than 250 of its backlist titles. The books are available to read online or download as PDFs. That’s right, free ebooks!

The publications date as far back as 1966 and span the Getty’s history and include exhibition catalogues, translations of texts on visual arts, works of art historical research, journals and more.
This vast collection of titles from J. Paul Getty Museum, Getty Research Institute, and Getty Conservation Institute are fully searchable.

These titles are a great companion to AADL’s large collection of physical art books that fall under the Ladies Library Collection! These art books are available for checkout, are large format, cover a wide range of art subjects, and are relevant to the average reader as well as academics. If you’re into beautiful art books with wonderful information, Getty and AADL have you covered!

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #437 - Ars longa, vita brevis (Art is long, life is short)

At the heart of Thomas Van Essen's debut - The Center of the World *, is perhaps the greatest painting by the renowned British painter J. M. W. Turner, and Henry Leiden, a middle-aged family man with a troubled marriage and a dead-end job, who finds his life transformed by the discovery of the painting in a secret compartment at his summer home in the Adirondacks.

Unlike the marine paintings Turner is known for, The Center of the World is a mesmerizing and erotic painting of Helen of Troy, so scandalous at the time that it was believed to have been burned by John Ruskin. Van Essen reimagines the 19th C. setting where Turner struggled to create this painting at the home of his patron Lord Egremont, and Elizabeth Spencer, Turner's muse and the model for his Helen.

"Filled with sex, beauty, and love (of all kinds), this richly textured novel explores the intersection between art and eroticism." "Van Essen writes gracefully and makes accessible the issue of art as transcendence...an appreciation for how art moves the human heart."

The Girl You Left Behind * by Jojo Moyes is about a 100 year-old painting that serves as catalyst in linking two loves stories, one set in occupied France during World War I, the other in contemporary London.

Liv Halston could not part with the painting her late husband David, a brilliant architect gave her as a wedding gift. Readers would be able to deduce that it is the same painting that Édouard, an artist who studied with Henri Matisse, painted of his wife Sophie Lefèvre, a village innkeeper before he headed off to war in 1916. The mystery is the odyssey of how this painting - The Girl I left Behind ended up in the hands of the Halstons, and who is the rightful owner - whether it is the Lefèvre heirs, the WWI occupying German kommandant who coerced a bargain with Sophie, or Liv who treasures it as the last link to the man she lost too soon?

"Moyes has created a riveting depiction of a wartime occupation that has mostly faded from memory. Liv and Sophie are so real in their faults, passion, and bravery that the reader is swept along right to the end. This one is hard to put down!"

Needing no introduction is Donna Tartt. In this her 3rd novel which took a good part of a decade to write The Goldfinch * * , the name is taken from a small, exquisitely rendered painting.

13 year-old Theo Decker miraculously survives an accident that takes the life of his mother. Alone and abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by a friend's family and struggles to make sense of his new life. In the years that follow, he becomes entranced by one of the few things that reminds him of his mother: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the art underworld.

"The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America, and a drama of almost unbearable acuity and power. It is a story of loss and obsession, survival and self-invention, and the enormous power of art."

* = starred review
* * = 2 starred reviews

The Monuments Men

One of the most anticipated movies this fall is The Monuments Men, based on the book The Monuments Men : Allied heroes, Nazi thieves, and the greatest treasure hunt in history by Robert M. Edsel.

The Monuments Men, a group of men and women from thirteen nations, most of them volunteers, who were museum directors, curators, art scholars and educators, artists, architects, and archivists. These mostly middle-aged family men, walked away from successful careers into the epicenter of the war, risking—and some losing—their lives. They raced against time in order to save the world’s greatest cultural treasures from destruction at the hands of Nazi regime.

A little known fact is that one of these brave men lived among us quietly for decades - Charles Sawyer, a member of the Roberts Commission, established by President Roosevelt on June 23, 1943, charged with promoting the preservation of cultural properties in war areas, provided this mission did not interfere with military operations. Professor Sawyer was the Director of the University of Michigan Museum of Art from 1957-1972.

The Charles Sawyer Center for Museum Studies at the University of Michigan Museum of Art was founded in his honor in 2003. “Charlie” Sawyer passed away after a brief illness on February 25, 2005. Here are the Old News articles on Charles Sawyer.

Michigan Artists Partner with MSU RCPD for a Dynamically Inclusive ArtPrize Entry

With a large demographic of the population that can be excluded from a variety of art forms, a group of artists known as The Diatribe took on the challenge of changing how art can be accessed. These Grand Rapids natives’ passion to expand the limits of accessibility to art inspired them to create their own exhibit at ArtPrize, the world’s largest public art competition. While hosting ArtPrize, the city of Grand Rapids becomes home to a diverse collection of independent artist’s work from 45 states and 47 countries. The Diatribe felt that ArtPrize was far too important of an event to still be inaccessible to some very large demographics. They set out to change this through their spoken word and in particular their exhibit, The Word of Mouth. Their piece will feature live portions of their poetry, along with videos, Braille text, murals, and visual art pertaining to sight, speech, or hearing. The videos will feature sign language and/or captions of the group’s spoken word. When faced with the challenge of making an entirely accessible exhibit, one of the collaborators turned to the MSU Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities when doing research. After a meeting, RCPD was left in awe of the work that these artists were doing and was ecstatic to be able to help them through the captioning and building tactile and Braille elements of their work and spreading the word about their exhibit. The biggest way you can help them spread their words and share in their art is by attending ArtPrize and voting on site for their exhibit. ArtPrize runs September 18 - October 6, 2013 and The Diatribe’s shows will be Mondays and Wednesdays from 5-8 pm.

Parent’s Corner: Art Attack

The Downtown library has a shelf in the Youth Department known as the Parent Shelf. On this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from language to tantrums to potty training to homework. These books are available for checkout, and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf,” if you’d like to have one sent to a branch of your choice.

Many children enjoy drawing or sculpting with Play-Doh. Their little hands and minds are ever creative and always imagining. AADL has some books that may help in facilitating their enjoyment of the arts with ideas on how to nurture this interest and enjoy art together. Check out Creative art & activities: fun with art!, Picture books plus: 100 extension activities in art, drama, music, math, and science, as well as Young at art : teaching toddlers self-expression, problem-solving skills, and an appreciation for art.

For more Parent Shelf finds on other topics see here.

Meet Mochimochi Land Creator & Fiber Artist, Anna Hrachovec!

Sunday July 14 | 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm | Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room | Grade 6 – Adult

Spend the afternoon with Anna Hrachovec - famous Brooklyn knitter, fiber artist and creator of the amazing Mochimochi Land world of tiny knitted toys, creatures and spectacular installations.

Anna will do a fun slideshow presentation, answer questions, and talk about the amazing world of tiny knitting she has created. Anna finds inspiration in Hello Kitty, Pee-Wee's Playhouse, and illustrators like Dr Seuss and Mary Blair, and in 2007, launched Mochimochi Land as a place where knitted toys and people can live together in a spirit of tolerance. Anna's knitted toys have been featured on The Martha Stewart Show, all around the web, and in print. You can find Anna's books, kits, and downloadable knitting and cross-stitch patterns on the mochimochiland.com website .

Anna's three books will be on sale from Literati Bookstoreand she will be signing after her presentation.

Summer Game Players take note: the 1st Mochimochi Land exhibit is UP in the Downtown Youth Department case! And it includes a gamecode!

Late breaking news flash! The next Mochimochi Land installation is UP! Take a trip Downtown to Liberty between Main and 4th and stop and look at the new window display at 826MI's Robot Supply & Repair store. You will find a wonderful world of kawaii and a game code!

Syndicate content