Jane-mania continues!

Jane Austen fans - have you read all of Jane Austen’s books and seen the two recent movies (Becoming Jane and The Jane Austen Book Club), but still can't get enough Jane?

Find a list of Austen-inspired fiction in the new Novelist article “Literature for Janeites.” You can also find authors with similar styles on their Jane Austen read-alike page.

Access the Novelist database in the Arts & Literature section of our Research page. Find a link to article on the Novelist home page, or use their ‘Search our Database’ tab to search articles. Janeites (and others) with library cards can search Novelist from home!

Resources for Art History Students

Taking art history this semester? Whether you’re researching Picasso or just need a quick definition of Art Nouveau, the AADL is here to help.

Check out the Grove Dictionary of Art database for artist biographies, bibliographies, and encyclopedia articles. You can also find images of artists’ works.

Access the Grove Dictionary of Art in the Arts & Literature section of our Research page. Library cardholders can search from home!

Homework Bits - "Electric Heroes" using RESEARCH databases

A 4th/5th grade assignment is to find information on "Electric Heroes" and their inventions. To use the RESEARCH databases, Choose MY ACCOUNT and login. These databases are not on the internet. They are only on library websites through your AADL library card.
The articles provide the citations you need to prove your research.
1. Choose the RESEARCH tab along the top of the website.
2. Use the link to "browse databases by name".
3. Choose BIOGRAPHY RESOURCE CENTER.
4. If you know names, use the last name to search for articles on that person.
5. If you do not know names, go to "Biographical Facts Search" and choose your keywords to find names. You will come up with articles to read, or print. I looked for a term in "occupations" related to electricity. I chose "electronics engineer". Then I chose "female" for gender. I got a list of names. I chose some names, and followed the link to read about them. You can find names and why they are mentioned.
6. Now the challenge is finding articles long enough to explain their work.

Homework Bits - "Exploration" using RESEARCH databases

A 4th/5th grade assignment is to find information on “exploration of north America”. To use the RESEARCH databases, Choose MY ACCOUNT and login. These databases are not on the internet. They are only on library websites through your AADL library card.
The articles provide the citations you need to prove your research.
1. Choose the RESEARCH tab along the top of the website.
2. Use the link to "browse databases by subject".
3. Choose “Kid’s and Teens”.
4. Choose “Kid’s INFOBITS”.
5. Choose” Advanced Search” and enter keywords.
I used “discovery”, “OR”, “exploration”, “AND”, “north America”. You will come up with articles to read, or print.
6. Now the challenge is finding "historical" exploration, and "keywords" for further research.

Reference U.S.A.- looking for someone or info on companies?

Reference USAReference USA

So your old friend moved to Nevada but you don’t know where. Try using the library’s research product Reference USA to find them. Reference USA is found on the library’s website under the Research tab.

Another very important & useful feature of this software is looking up businesses by region/etc and limiting the search to specific types of companies. It’s a great resource for sales & marketing leads. My search for info on ICE CREAM & FROZEN DESSERTS (MFRS) in Michigan yielded 40 businesses.

Use Reference USA at any Ann Arbor District Library location or from your home / business computer. Off site usage requires your Ann Arbor District Library card #.

TumbleBooks: Online Stories for Kids

TumbleBooksTumbleBooks

One of the eResources that the library subscribes to is Tumblebooks. You can read stories, listen to stories, and get help on sounding out words. I like Robert Munsch. TumbleBooks has five stories by him: 50 Below Zero, The Fire Station, The Paper Bag Princess, Pigs, and Wait and See. I just listened to Robert Munsch read 50 Below Zero. I could read along and watch the animated illustrations. It was great. Give TumbleBooks a try.

Help for Literature Students

Are you taking a lit class this semester? Before you tackle that term paper, check out what the Literature Resource Center database has to offer.

Literature Resource Center contains journal articles, selected websites, and reference articles on over 128,000 authors! Find criticism and overviews of works, author biographies - even see a timeline of literary events.

Access this database in the Arts, Literature, & Humanities section of our Research page. Use your Library card to search the database from home.

The Perfect Yawn?

Ever ‘caught’ a yawn from someone else? According to University of Maryland professor Robert Provine, about 55% of viewers seeing a yawn will yawn themselves. Provine embarked on a quest to design “the 100 percent contagious yawn” (inspired by a Monty Python sketch).

Intrigued? NPR’s All Things Considered talked to Provine about his experiments on September 24th. See if you can make it though the story without yawning yourself – I couldn’t!

Want to learn more? Read Provine’s article about his early research in the December 2005 issue of American Scientist. The full text of the article is available through the General Reference Center Gold database on the library’s Research page.

Champagne at the Gandy Dancer

Today is the birthday of world renowned poet Donald Hall, and to celebrate, The Writers Almanac is displaying one of his poems, “The judge was decent, but . . “ about Hall’s 1972 marriage in Ann Arbor to poet Jane Kenyon. As the poem says, it was a basic municipal marriage -- but afterwards they did drink champagne at the Gandy Dancer. Five years later they remarried in New Hampshire, ". . . joyful
in a wooden church,
a Saturday afternoon in April,
only Jack Jensen our
friend and minister with us . . ."

Resources for students - graphics for presentations and papers

Need a photo or chart to spruce up that research paper or presentation?

You’re sure to find one among the 3.5 million images in the Associated Press (AP) Multimedia Archive. This database allows you to search or browse AP images from as far back as 1860 – then download, email, or print them to use in your assignments.

Find the AP Multimedia Archive in the General Interest section of our Research page. You can also access the database from home with your Library card.

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