What's Happening This Week!

big batbig batDon't miss these upcoming events!

ART LECTURE: DIA docent Carol George discusses Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo and presents a preview of the upcoming DIA exhibit on Thursday March 5 at 7:00 pm at the Downtown Library.

POETRY WORKSHOP: Adults and teens are invited to a special Emerging Writers Workshop focusing on poetry on Thursday March 5 at 7:00 pm at Traverwood Branch.

THIS WEEKEND:

SCIENCE AND NATURE: The Organization for Bat Conservation visits the Pittsfield Branch on Sunday March 8 at 2:00 pm to present an interactive program for kids featuring bats and other nocturnal creatures. Come face to face with these creatures of the night and learn about their survival tools.

CRAFTS: Adults and teens can learn how to spin yarn when they make their own drop spindle on Saturday March 7 at 1:00 pm at Malletts Creek Branch and can create felt flowers on Sunday March 8 at 2:00 pm at Malletts Creek Branch.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS: Preschoolers can enjoy a morning yoga session on Saturday March 7 at 10:00 am at Pittsfield Branch.

HANDS-ON MINECRAFT WORKSHOP: Kids can learn programming basics while enjoying Minecraft on Saturday March 7 at 2:00 pm at the Downtown Library.

COMING UP NEXT WEEK:

BOOK DISCUSSION: Teachers are invited to participate in the UMS Book Discussion For Teachers on Tuesday March 10 at 4:30 pm in the Downtown Library. This session focuses on The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. Du Bois.

CRAFT: Kids can enjoy a story and craft based on the book Click Clack Moo: Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin on Monday March 9 at 1:00 pm at Malletts Creek Branch.

Award-Winning Chef Takashi Yagihashi Of Ann Arbor’s Slurping Turtle Restaurant

Sunday March 15, 2015: 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event will be recorded

Spend the afternoon with internationally-known Chef Takashi Yagihashi.

Over his twenty-five year career, Takashi Yagihashi has been lauded by consumers and critics alike for his exquisite ways of melding contemporary French, Asian and American cuisine.

A native of Mito, Japan, the self-taught Yagihashi was working in a local restaurant when the owner asked him to relocate to the States and work for him there; over the next several years, the young chef worked his way up the culinary ladder throughout Chicago.

In late 2011, Chicago’s Slurping Turtle opened to instantaneous success and received a Michelin Bib Gourmand Award in 2013. Located in Chicago's River North neighborhood, Slurping Turtle offers Japanese comfort food, where delicate balance and respect for natural flavors continues to be a hallmark of his cooking style. Slurping Turtle expanded to Ann Arbor in Spring 2014.

Takashi published his first cookbook, Takashi’s Noodles, in 2009. When asked what he loves most about cooking, “I love the whole process – from cutting fish to the final plating. The creativity of coming up with a dish combined with the execution of the final product, start to finish, that’s what I like the most.”

Learn more about Chef Takashi Yagihashi, his love for cooking and Ann Arbor’s Slurping Turtle Restaurant. This event will include a tasting of some of Chef Yagihashi’s creations and a book signing with books for sale.

New Documentaries on DVD

New DVDs and Blu-rays are often hitting the catalog, whether it’s film or television, fiction or nonfiction. The AADL owns a slew of fabulous documentaries, and more documentaries have recently been added. Here’s a full list, with newest additions listed first, and below are a few to get you started:

The sixties
The 1960s was the decade America transformed from a country of conformity to a land of political, cultural, and social liberation. Looking through the lens of television, this production weaves together the events and personalities that influenced and dominated the 1960s in America, sketching a portrait of this remarkable decade that is both entertaining and illuminating.

Fat, sick & nearly dead 2
The second inspirational documentary in the higly successful franchise. This reconnects Joe with his followers from the first film to catch viewers up on how the impact of juicing has changed their lives. With help from friends, family and the medical communit, he not only shows viewers were he is now, but also continues to educate viewers about the critical role that family and community support play in maintaining this healthy lifestyle.

Code Black
In his vivid and thought-provoking filmmaking debut, physician Ryan McGarry gives an unprecedented access to America's busiest Emergency Department. Amidst real life-and-death situations, McGarry follows a dedicated team of charismatic young doctors-in-training as they wrestle with both their ideals and the realities of saving lives in a complex and overburdened system.

The Fidel Castro tapes: The story of the Cuban dictator's turbulent leadership
In 1959, Fidel Castro rose to power in Cuba. He has been one of the most controversial figures in the world ever since. This chronicles the Cuban leader's ability to maintain control through ongoing tumult in his country, and in his dealings with the United States and the rest of the world.

Parent’s Corner: “Mom, I’m Hungry!”

Kids seem to be hungry all the time. Always wanting a snack or a juice box, even after they’ve just ate. How and what do you feed the kid who wants to eat all day? The Parent Shelf is located in the downtown youth area, and on this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from food and nutrition to potty training to time-outs to homework. These books are available for checkout and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf.”

Beating the lunch box blues: Fresh ideas for lunches on the go! is found on that shelf, and sounds like a great way to spice up the brown bag lunches if you’re burned out on spreading peanut butter on bread. For more titles, check out this list of great books featuring more fun lunch box ideas.

For additional food ideas and insight on dealing with food challenges, check out Food fights: Winning the Nutritional challenges of parenthood armed with insight, humor and a bottle of ketchup, and Whatever happened to dinner?: Recipes and ideas for family mealtime.

And of course here are even more food titles to help with meal planning and encouraging healthy eating habits.

 

Bee Awareness: Protecting our Pollinators With Dr. Meghan Milbrath Of Sand Hill Apiaries

Media Player

October 20, 2014 at Downtown MPR

What is going on with bees? Honey bees have been all over the media lately with talks of colony collapse and the doom of our food system.

Dr. Meghan Milbrath gives a brief history of bees and beekeeping in the United States, and talks about their current role in Agriculture. She will untangle what we know are the root causes for their decline, and discuss ways that you can become involved to help their plight.

Dr. Meghan Milbrath owns and manages Sand Hill Apiaries, a small beekeeping and queen rearing operation in Munith, MI. She began working with bees with her father over 20 years ago, and has been hooked on bees since. She most recently worked as a postdoctoral research associate in the Entomology Department at Michigan State University, studying honey bee disease with renowned bee researcher, Zachary Huang.

This event was cosponsored by the League of Women Voters of the Ann Arbor Area (LWV-AAA).

Length: 
01:17:59
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library

New Picture Books With a Twist!

Sometimes new picture books come out that are presented in a nontraditional format. Here are three great examples of books that feature a messy story with interruptions, a story that’s read backwards and upside down, and story with a choose-your-own-ending.

A Perfectly Messed-Up Story
In this classically cute story by Patrick McDonnell, Louie becomes angry when the story in which he appears is ruined by messes from jelly, peanut butter, finger prints, and other things that do not belong in books. It’s quite funny! In the end he realizes that it’s still a good story – messes and all.

The Story Starts Here:
Little Wolf decides to do things his way, including starting his story at the back of the book instead of the front, wearing pants on his head, and playing piano with his toes. But at some point the book has to turn upside down in order to turn things right side up.

Milo and the Mysterious Island:
Milo wishes to see what’s beyond the horizon and he and the other mice build a raft and set off on a voyage. The book reads as normal, then you get to a point where there are split pages. One set of pages finishes the story with a happy ending, and the other set of pages finishes the story with a sad ending – you get to decide which one you want to read! Or of course you can read both. Written by Marcus Pfister, author of Rainbow Fish.

New and Unusual Animal Books

If you or your little one loves animals, we have some great new books in that will teach you all about them in a whole new way! You’ll want to look at all of these beautiful, bright, and fascinating books.

First up, check out Bone Collection: Animals, which offers realistic drawings of animals’ skeletons with explanations of how the bones fit together and what purpose they all serve. Mixed in with the skeleton drawings are photographs of the animals and lots of facts. I learned so much from this book! Did you know that kangaroos’ tails are heavy to support their weight during fights, or that even though fruit bats are only 15 inches long, their wingspan can be longer than 5½ feet? That’s taller than I am! Learn all about this and more in this beautiful book.

For an amazing look at how wildlife adapts, take a look at Chernobyl’s Wild Kingdom: Life in the Dead Zone. This brilliant book explains the disastrous 1986 Chernobyl nuclear reactor explosion and explores the aftermath. This book details the recovery of plants and animals in the area, which was initially assumed to be impossible. The effects of radiation are explained in clear, detailed language, and photographs highlight the difference between animals living within the “dead zone” and without.

If you’re after beautiful illustrations and simple, informative text, look at illustrator Steve Jenkins’s new books, Creature Features: 25 Animals Explain Why They Look the Way They Do, and Eye to Eye: How Animals See the World. With a combination of true facts and big pictures, these books are perfect for younger readers.

New Non-Fiction for Kids: Inventions that could have changed the world... but didn't!

Over the course of history, a lot of people have changed the world. Of course, even more people have also WANTED to change the world… but it hasn’t quite worked out. The brand new book Inventions That Could Have Changed the World… But Didn’t! describes some of the toys, games, household and office aids, and general contraptions that have been thought up but didn’t quite succeed in actuality. From a combination pogo stick/helicopter to Toaster Bacon, this fun book is filled with goofy and fascinating inventions from the ages. Inventions That Could Have Changed the World also has interesting and easy-to-understand information about patents and tips for getting your OWN invention to succeed.

Interested in other books about inventions and inventing? Try 100 Inventions That Made History, The Story of Inventions, or Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women.

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