Fabulous Fiction Firsts #236

Kathleen Winter's debut novel Annabel, a finalist for Canada's Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General's Award for Fiction and the Rogers Writers' Trust Award is a luminous and deeply affection portrait of growing up with a secret few would understand, which one family is desperate to hide.

In 1968, into the devastating, spare atmosphere of the remote coastal town of Labrador, Canada, an intersex child is born. Three people hold fast to the secret - the baby's parents, and a trusted midwife/friend, Thomasina. While the father makes the difficult decision to raise the child as a boy named Wayne, the mother continues to quietly nurture the boy’s female side. And as Wayne grows into adulthood within the hyper-masculine hunting society of his father, his shadow-self, a girl he thinks of as “Annabel,” is never entirely extinguished and only comes to light after a medical emergency.

"Kathleen Winter has crafted a literary gem about the urge to unveil mysterious truth in a culture that shuns contradiction, and the body’s insistence on coming home. A daringly unusual debut full of unforgettable beauty...".

Since Jeffrey Eugenides' Middlesex (2002), I cannot think of another novel that treats the subject of androgyne with such insight, sensitivity and humanity. Fearless, moving, and absolutely compelling.

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weird!