Breaking the Stress Cycle from Childhood to Adulthood

Monday October 23, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event will be recorded

The U.S. is experiencing a widespread and growing stress epidemic. Stress related disorders and diseases have been on the rise for decades according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. National surveys that assess how stressed and anxious we feel show a very similar pattern. And it shows up in our bodies, even before we get sick: the “physiological stress load” that tracks key biological markers shows similar increases, and is getting worse as each new age group enters adulthood. More children and youth may also be experiencing greater stress dysregulation and difficulties in coping, owing to the lifelong impact of early life adversity that is tied biologically and psychologically to this epidemic.

Join Dr. Daniel P. Keating for a fascinating evening as he discusses that research shows how we can break this cycle, both for individuals and families at every stage of development, and for society more generally.

Dr. Keating is currently Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry, and Pediatrics, and Research Professor in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. His current research focuses on the impact of early life adversity on child and youth development, and on the neurodevelopmental pathways in adolescent risk behavior. His most recent book is Born Anxious: The Lifelong Impact of Early Life Adversity – and How to Break the Cycle.

This program is part of the "Exploring the Mind" series and is a partnership with The University of Michigan Department of Psychology