The Informationist

This is a gritty, dark mystery with the incomparably corrupt Equatorial Guinea used for a backdrop. Reviewers of Taylor Stevens' debut novel have touted The Informationist as similar to The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. Let the comparisons between Vanessa Munroe and Lisbeth Salander end here. While both stories are fast-paced and intriguing, this is unlike any other thriller you have read.

Many portions of The Informationist are so raw the reader may have to stop and process it to try and understand where such powerful scenes come from. One minute the fugitives are discussing the variety of West African coup attempts from the past three decades, and the next, Munroe conceals herself on a rooftop to suffer the religious diatribes pounding in her head.

The author’s personal history may be the source for these powerful sections. Stevens was born into the Children of God cult, from which she escaped with her family at the age of 28. For two decades she was constantly uprooted and moved to various countries to do the groups bidding; at no time was she outside the cult’s control. Even after escape, her life was deeply affected by her upbringing. Combining her life experiences with her previously untapped storytelling talents resulted in the creation of the Vanessa Munroe series.