Fischer and Finnell Store, 1910 and now, by Kim Scarborough


Fischer and Finnell Store, 1910 and now, by Kim Scarborough

Photo by Kim Scarborough, available at: http://kim.scarborough.chicago.il.us/

An interesting partnership -- Fischer was the son of German immigrants, and James Finnell was Irish, from a Northfield Township family. Although most of Ann Arbor's German settlers were Protestants, Fischer was a parishioner of St. Thomas Catholic Church. He and Finnell probably had gone to the parish school together. Finnell later became a traveling auctioneer, in the style of Braun and Helmer of these latter days.

The horse-drawn delivery van was one of a fleet of dozens operated by the Merchants' Delivery Company. A housewife could shop downtown on foot, or by way of the trolley, and not have to lug her packages home --the Merchants' Delivery took care of that chore.

The donkey was a photographer's prop. He would lead the docile animal through the neighborhoods, getting parents to pose their children with it. He probably charged a fee up front, then delivered the prints in person or by mail. As a child in the '30s, my brother posed in a cowboy outfit on the saddle of a pony led around in just this way. (My parents lived on Marshall Court, just a few blocks from this intersection.)

In the 1920s, this building was called "The Delta" because of its shape, but I don't know if that was the original name.

Summary: from the "Then and Now" collection, Kim Scarborough http://kim.scarborough.chicago.il.us/

Keywords: Ann Arbor, Packard St., State St., buildings, Campus Corner


pictureAnnArbor: Local History

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