Local History Photos

Mary Clark


Mary Clark

The most important of the early schools was begun in 1839 by Miss Mary Clark with her sisters Chloe and Roby, who had all been educated at the Willard School in Troy, New York. Young ladies from throughout southeast Michigan, New York, and Ohio were attracted to the school by Miss Clark's promise of a "thorough and polite" education where students were encouraged to think independently. The school closed in 1875 after Mary's death.

A recognized authority on botany, Miss Clark took her students on weekly excursions to collect and catalog native wildflowers.


People: Mary Clark

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Image Courtesy of the Washtenaw County Historical Society


Ellen Morse House


Ellen Morse House

Ellen Morse, who built 419 North State Street, donated it for the first St. Joseph's Hospital.

Ellen Morse and her mother, Hanorah, built and operated eight rooming houses for students in the 1870s and 1880s. She gave her house at State and Kingsley to the Sisters of Mercy for the first St. Joseph's Hospital. When the Sisters built a larger hospital on Ingalls, the house became the first Old Ladies Home.

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Places: 419 North State Street

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Image Courtesy of the Washtenaw County Historical Society


Henry Simmons Frieze


Henry Simmons Frieze

Much beloved professor of Latin, Henry Simmons Frieze served three times as acting president. A gifted musician, he founded the University Musical Society and collected classical works of art that formed the beginning of what grew into the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

Bentley Image Bank: BL003648


People: Henry Simmons Frieze

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Image Courtesy of the Washtenaw County Historical Society


James Kingsley


James Kingsley

Attorney "Honest Jim" Kingsley, who came to Ann Arbor in 1826, was the first member of the Washtenaw County Bar, a probate judge, and a member of both the territorial and later the state legislature, as well as Ann Arbor's second mayor and a regent of the University.


People: James Kingsley

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Image Courtesy of the Washtenaw County Historical Society


The Manns


The Manns

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Mann, who arrived in Ann Arbor in 1830, were the first Germans to settle here permanently. Finding the land to be excellent for farming, they encouraged friends and relatives from southern Germany to join them. As more families emigrated, they sent for a German Lutheran minister.


People: Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Mann

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Image Courtesy of the Washtenaw County Historical Society


Anna Botsford Bach


Anna Botsford Bach

Anna Botsford Bach, the daughter of pioneers, married successful businessman Philip Bach in 1876. They entertained frequently in the parlors of their fourteen-room home on South Main Street opposite Packard Street. Mrs. Bach served nine years on the school board and was its first female president. An active member of the Ladies Library Association and the YWCA, she helped organize the Sarah Caswell Angell Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Old Ladies Home Association, later named in her honor.


People: Anna Botsford Bach

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Image Courtesy of the Washtenaw County Historical Society


William S. Maynard's elegant estate at Main and William Streets


William S. Maynard's elegant estate at Main and William Streets

Ezra Maynard settled his family on a farm in Pittsfield Township that is now part of Cobblestone Farm. His son William Maynard became a wealthy merchant, served several terms as mayor, and added most of the Old West Side to the city.



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Rights Held by: Image Courtesy of the Washtenaw County Historical Society


Eugene Power


Eugene Power

Eugene Power, a pioneer in microphotography, established University Microfilms in 1938, initially offering microfilm editions of rare books and then of doctoral dissertations, journals, newspapers, out-of-print books, and much more. In 1971 the UM's Power Center for the Performing Arts was made possible by a gift from Eugene and his family.


People: Eugene Power

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Rights Held by: Image Courtesy of the Washtenaw County Historical Society


The Star Theater


The Star Theater

The Star was the site of a famous student riot in March 1908. Incensed at alleged mistreatment, more than 1,000 angry students stormed the theater and destroyed its facade. Several arrests were made, but the affair was soon smoothed over. The Star reopened a week later and lasted until 1919.



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Rights Held by: Image Courtesy of the Washtenaw County Historical Society


Old St. Thomas


Old St. Thomas

In 1835, Roman Catholics began meeting in Northfield Township. Ten years later they built Ann Arbor's first brick church, Old St. Thomas. It stood on the south side of East Kingsley Street between Division and State.



Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Image Courtesy of the Washtenaw County Historical Society