English as a Second Language Conversation Group

Tuesday January 27, 2015: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Traverwood Branch: Program Room

Washtenaw Literacy's ESL groups focus on speaking and listening skills for adults in an informal, relaxed setting. TOEFL preparation is also available.

Webcomics Lab: Making Webcomics - Brad Guigar

Tuesday January 27, 2015: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Malletts Creek Branch: Program Room

This event is intended for adults and teens grade 9 and up.

Got an idea for a webcomic but don't know where to start? Having trouble finding the time to put into that comics project? Or maybe you just want a break from creating alone in your studio (or the coffee shop) and wish you could work along side of your fellow comics creators? Come to the monthly Webcomics Lab at AADL, where you can make your comics in the company of other cartoonists. Work you finish during the Lab can be submitted for inclusion on the new AADL Webcomics Page!

This month Brad Guigar co-author of How to Make Webcomics, will be our special guest via Skype. Brad has been working on webcomics for over a decade now, starting with Greystone Inn and eventually spinning that off into Evil Inc. He’s been a very active voice in webcomics, working as the editor-in-chief for Webcomics.com, author of The Webcomics Handbook (follow-up to How to Make Webcomics), and one of the hosts for the Webcomics Weekly podcast.

Wild Swan's 'Coming to America'

Tuesday January 27, 2015: 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for grades 3 - 8

Wild Swan Theater presents a stirring musical play about immigration, following the journeys of four children from different parts of the world who make their way to a new life in America.

'Coming to America' is an original production based on the lives of children who came to the U.S. from around the world. This multicultural production interweaves the adventures, songs, humor, hardships, and triumphs of the people who built our country.

With music by Laz Slomovits of Gemini, the play follows the adventures of children from four countries: Russia, the Dominican Republic, Vietnam and Lebanon as they leave their homelands and journey to America. Their stories are filled with the courage, hope, dreams and laughter of our collective immigrant histories as they overcome huge obstacles in their quest for a better life.

Preschool Storytimes

Wednesday January 28, 2015: 10:00 am to 10:30 am -- Malletts Creek Branch: Program Room

This event is intended for ages 2 - 5 years.

Join us for stories and songs for listeners age 2 to 5 years, accompanied by an adult.

Siblings are welcome.

Preschool Storytimes

Wednesday January 28, 2015: 11:00 am to 11:30 am -- Downtown Library: Youth Story Corner

This event is intended for ages 2 - 5 years.

Join us for stories and songs for listeners age 2 to 5 years, accompanied by an adult.

Siblings are welcome.

Baby Playgroups

Wednesday January 28, 2015: 11:00 am to 12:00 pm -- Pittsfield Branch: Program Room

This event is intended for babies up to 24 months.

This is a time for babies up to 24 months and their grown-ups to gather and play. The Library will provide the space and a variety of toys.

Each playgroup includes 15 minutes of stories, rhymes and songs. Parents/guardians must remain with their children.

No older siblings, please.

Circle K Homework Help

Wednesday January 28, 2015: 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm -- Downtown Library: Youth Story Corner

This event is intended for grades K-12

Need help with homework? Students in grades K-12 can get homework help at AADL, provided by volunteers for the University of Michigan chapter of Circle K. No appointment necessary - just drop by!

Preschool Storytimes

Wednesday January 28, 2015: 6:00 pm to 6:30 pm -- Traverwood Branch: Program Room

This event is intended for ages 2 - 5 years.

Join us for stories and songs for listeners age 2 to 5 years, accompanied by an adult.

Siblings are welcome.

English as a Second Language Conversation Group

Wednesday January 28, 2015: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Traverwood Branch: Program Room

Washtenaw Literacy's ESL groups focus on speaking and listening skills for adults in an informal, relaxed setting. TOEFL preparation is also available.

The Author's Forum presents 'Staging Ground: An American Theater and Its Ghosts,' A Conversation with Leslie Stainton, Jim Leija, Martin Walsh and Leigh Woods.

Wednesday January 28, 2015: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Interweaving past and present, private anecdote and public record, Ann Arbor author Leslie Stainton's new book Staging Ground: An American Theater and Its Ghosts captures the history of one of America’s oldest and most ghosted theaters—the Fulton Theatre in Lancaster, Pennsylvania—and recounts the story of a nation’s tumultuous struggle to invent itself.

This event features a short reading from the book by Stainton followed by a conversation with Jim Leija (UMS), Martin Walsh (actor and U-M instructor) and Leigh Woods (actor and U-M theater professor). The event includes a book signing and books will be for sale.

Built in 1852 and in use ever since, the Fulton Theatre in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, is uniquely ghosted. Its foundations were once the walls of a colonial jail that in 1763 witnessed the massacre of the last surviving Conestoga Indians. Those same walls later served to incarcerate fugitive slaves. Staging Ground explores these tragic events and their enduring resonance in a building that later became a town hall, theater, and movie house--the site of minstrel shows, productions of "Uncle Tom's Cabin," oratory by the likes of Thaddeus Stevens and Mark Twain, performances by Buffalo Bill and his troupe of "Wild Indians," Hollywood Westerns, and twenty-first-century musicals.
Interweaving past and present, private anecdote and public record, Stainton unfolds the story of this emblematic space, where for more than 250 years Americans scripted and re-scripted their history.

Staging Ground sheds light on issues that continue to form us as a people: the evolution of American culture and faith, the immigrant experience, the growth of cities, the emergence of women in art and society, the spread of advertising, the flowering of transportation and technology, and the abiding paradox of a nation founded on the principle of equality for "all men," yet engaged in the slave trade and in the systematic oppression of the American Indian.

This event is co-sponsored by the U-M Institute for the Humanities, and the Ann Arbor Book Festival, and the U-M Library in collaboration with UMS and AADL