Current & Upcoming Exhibits

Equilibrium: Paintings By Cathy Barry

Now through December 11, 2014 -- Malletts Creek Branch: Exhibits

Ann Arbor Women Artists – Fall 2014 Juried Exhibition

Now through November 24, 2014 -- Downtown Library: 3rd Floor Exhibit, Downtown Library: Lower Level Display Cases, Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room Exhibit

Farewell to Youth: Mixed Media Paintings – The Painting Section of the U-M Faculty Women's Club

Now through July 31, 2014 -- Malletts Creek Branch: Exhibits

This group exhibit features the collected works of the Painting Section of the University of Michigan’s Faculty Women’s Club (FWC) covers a large variety of styles and media.

The FWC is a cross campus organization, offering members acquaintance and fellowship. The members of the Painting Section have been “painting” together regularly since 1929, creating award-winning pieces in a wide variety of media, and learning from one another at weekly gatherings in their homes. Sharing experiences with new media, critiquing one another’s work, and encouraging exploration in artistic expression are the basic elements of their continuing study of the visual arts as a group. Shows of their works have been displayed for the past 44 years at venues in the greater Ann Arbor area, including art fairs, art galleries, banks, churches, and libraries. The FWC strive to enrich the cultural life of the Ann Arbor area by raising awareness of, and by encouraging active participation in, the visual arts.

Stacked Vessels: Glass Artwork by Annette Baron

Now through June 29, 2014 -- Downtown Library: Lower Level Display Cases

The Stacked Vessels series is a combination of classic and whimsical vessel forms. These assembled forms are inspired by the image of a water drop landing in a pool of still water. The rings are reminiscent of ripples and the lid of rebounding drops thrown back into the air.

Baron's formal study was not in visual arts but in music. After working as a professional musician she made a career change. Baron took classes at the Toledo Museum of Art and studied the museum’s vast glass collection. She has found it both significant and self-informing how much her experience as a musician now reveals itself in her work as a glass artist. Time, rhythm, form and color, all familiar concepts that fluently translate into glass.

The furnace at Baron Glassworks was fired up on November 24, 1998 in Ypsilanti, Michigan. It was designed and built to function equally as a working artist’s studio and school. People walk through the door with different aptitudes for this media. Some have many transferrable skills and excel with judicious guidance and access to facilities while others require a greater investment of time and energy. Baron accepts all students who share her passion for glass.

Sights and Sounds: Photomontage by KaraLynn Kinsman

Now through June 28, 2014 -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room Exhibit

This exhibit features Michigan artist KaraLynn Kinsman in a show entitled “Sights & Sounds.” The show will be open June 3 – July 10 in the Multi-Purpose Room of the downtown library. It will include 20 digital photomontage works that include urban landscapes with visual sound wave overlays.

Kinsman describes the work as a visual portrait that involves multiple senses. “Have you ever looked at a photograph and wondered ‘What would it be like to be standing in this place?’
I decided to address that question using visual layering.” The images include images taken from Chicago, Detroit, Mount Pleasant and Lansing. The work also shows a diverse group of landscapes that include everything from alleys to skylines.

KaraLynn Kinsman is a Michigan native, born in Detroit and raised in Sterling Heights. Kinsman graduated with B.A.A in 2-Dimensional Studio Art from Central Michigan University in Mount Pleasant, MI. She has since moved back to the Detroit Metro area where she is doing exhibitions and working as a preschool teacher. She plans on attending graduate school to obtain her M.F.A in Photography.

Child in a Strange Country: Exhibit and Events


The traveling exhibit from the Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind, "Child in a Strange Country: Helen Keller and the History of Education for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired" officially opens this Friday, May 2, with a reception featuring library director Josie Parker, Museum Director Micheal A. Hudson, harpist Deborah Gabrion, and refreshments.

But the exhibit is already assembled enough (in the Downtown Library's lobby and 3rd floor) to see it will be fun and informative featuring a big globe with raised features, selections of writing such as Valentin Hauy’s tactile book and Louis Braille’s dot code, and insights, events, and photographs from Helen's life.

The title of the exhibit comes from Anne Sullivan's report about Helen in which she said, “For the first two years of her intellectual life she was like a child in a strange country,” and noted that no learning was possible until she could overcome the communication barrier posed by blindness and deafness. With that in mind, “Child in a Strange Country” explores four primary subjects: Reading, Science, Math, and Geography. Using Helen Keller’s educational journey as a lens, the exhibit uses tactile reproductions and authentic artifacts to uncover the roots of modern education for children with vision loss. The exhibit is designed to be fully accessible and interactive. You can touch and explore that big globe as much as you want.

If the exhibit whets your appetite, come see Child in a Strange Country or Why is Helen Keller at the Water Pump the Only Person Who Was Blind that Most Americans Know?, on Sunday, May 4 from 2 - 3:30 PM, a talk by Museum Director Micheal A. Hudson in which he explores major advances in learning and literacy since 1784 for people who are blind or visually impaired, introducing characters that most people do not know. Also join us on Wednesday, May 7 from 7 - 8:30 PM for Sensory Communication: Relaying and Receiving Information Through Touch, in which UM Performing Arts Technology Professor Sile O'Modhrain discusses touch, communication, and Helen Keller.

You may also be interested in Visions 2014 in the Morris Lawrence Building at Washtenaw Community College on Wednesday, May 14 from 10 AM - 3 PM, where a variety of exhibitors demonstrate the latest products and services for people with vision loss. The fair also features presentations by guest speakers from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Disabled, UM Kellogg Eye Center, WLBPD @ AADL, and the AT Guys.

Artist Margaret Carney Discusses 'Demystifying Women and Dinnerware'

Friday October 17, 2014: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

In conjunction with their Annual exhibition, Ann Arbor Women Artists join the Library to present this lecture by Margaret Carney, the juror for the Fall 2014 exhibit at the Library. Winners of the Ann Arbor Women Artists Fall 2014 Juried Exhibition will also be announced. The evening will begin with a 6:00 pm reception, where the public is invited to view the exhibition before the lecture and awards presentation.

In Carnery’s lecture, Demystifying Women and Dinnerware, the creations of woman artists and designers represented in the permanent collection of the Dinnerware Museum in Ann Arbor will be explored, as well as examples from the Museum’s “wish list.” There will also be some surprises. Don’t expect to see grandma’s dishes during this presentation unless your grandma’s cups, saucers, and spoons were fur-lined.

Gifts of Art, Call for Entries for August 2014- August 2015 Exhibition Year

As one of the first and most comprehensive art programs in health care systems nationwide, Gifts of Art brings the world of art and music to the University of Michigan Health System. Over the course of one year, nine galleries will display over 50 exhibits, including 2-D and 3-D spaces that are viewed by approximately 10,000 people a day! These galleries are some of the most widely visited indoor, non-museum exhibits spaces in the state.

Solo exhibits, individual artists and group exhibits from art organizations are encouraged to submit their work. Selections will be made from online submissions or submissions by mail. To submit an entry by mail, download and print this form. Please do not email JPG images or submit entries in-person. The submission deadline has been extended to May 31, 2014.

Questions? Call (734) 936-ARTS (2787) or email GiftsofArt@umich.edu or kmtalley@umich.edu.

If you're interested in featuring your work at the Ann Arbor District Library, explore the exhibits page and send us your submission!

Inspired Addition - More Trees for Traverwood

WindbreakWindbreakOne of my very favorite spaces in town is the reading room of the Traverwood Branch Library. I think it is that combination of coziness, open space and trees, inside of the building, that makes me feel so calm. I didn't think it could get better until a donated piece of artwork was installed over the fireplace. Gale Nobe's black & white photograph, Windbreak, is the perfect addition to the space.The row of aspen trees in the image visually echos the tree-inspired architecture of Traverwood. We have exhibited Gale's work previously, but this venue highlights the lovely and haunting evening scene with the moon hanging overhead. Go in peace and enjoy!

Curriculum of Color: Rudolf Steiner School of Ann Arbor Annual Student Art Exhibit

Now through April 14, 2014 -- Downtown Library: 3rd Floor Exhibit and Downtown Library: Lower Level Display Cases and Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room Exhibit

In Waldorf education, the arts are an essential component of the curriculum, providing avenues for recognition and understanding of the world in which we live.

This exhibit will feature student oil and watercolor paintings, drawings and mosaics. Of special interest this year is the student work featured in the lower level display cases, which will include woodwork, handwork, and sculpture, plus beautiful main lesson books which span a curriculum that is unparalleled in diversity and richness.

Michigan Artists Partner with MSU RCPD for a Dynamically Inclusive ArtPrize Entry

With a large demographic of the population that can be excluded from a variety of art forms, a group of artists known as The Diatribe took on the challenge of changing how art can be accessed. These Grand Rapids natives’ passion to expand the limits of accessibility to art inspired them to create their own exhibit at ArtPrize, the world’s largest public art competition. While hosting ArtPrize, the city of Grand Rapids becomes home to a diverse collection of independent artist’s work from 45 states and 47 countries. The Diatribe felt that ArtPrize was far too important of an event to still be inaccessible to some very large demographics. They set out to change this through their spoken word and in particular their exhibit, The Word of Mouth. Their piece will feature live portions of their poetry, along with videos, Braille text, murals, and visual art pertaining to sight, speech, or hearing. The videos will feature sign language and/or captions of the group’s spoken word. When faced with the challenge of making an entirely accessible exhibit, one of the collaborators turned to the MSU Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities when doing research. After a meeting, RCPD was left in awe of the work that these artists were doing and was ecstatic to be able to help them through the captioning and building tactile and Braille elements of their work and spreading the word about their exhibit. The biggest way you can help them spread their words and share in their art is by attending ArtPrize and voting on site for their exhibit. ArtPrize runs September 18 - October 6, 2013 and The Diatribe’s shows will be Mondays and Wednesdays from 5-8 pm.

Michigan Wildlife Exhibits From The Leslie Science And Nature Center

This summer we welcome back three live animal exhibits from the Leslie Science and Nature Center.

Visit the Malletts Creek Branch to see an eastern newt in an aquatic enclosure along with some little pond bug friends (at least until he eats them all). Drop in to the Pittsfield Branch to visit a grey tree frog who may even sing to you if you’re lucky. And be sure to stop by the Traverwood Branch for a lifecycle exhibit of the cecropia moth, currently housing last year’s cocoons, that will hatch into North America’s largest native moth over the next 3-5 days. The moths only live for about one week, and we release them after a few days, so you’ll need to hurry if you want to see them before they’re gone. The moths reproduce by laying eggs that hatch into caterpillars, who will spend the summer growing through several impressive phases before building cocoons for the winter. You’ll get to witness multiple caterpillar instars simultaneously at any given time in the enclosure, try to identify them all!

Be sure to watch for this Friday's badge drop at play.aadl.org for a chance to earn Summer Game badges and points for visiting the critters, and read on for some sneak preview video!

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