Project M/Super Smash Brothers "Not So" Regulation Throwdown

Saturday September 20, 2014: 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

This event is intended for grade 6 - adult.

Looking for a smash? Missing that classic melee gameplay?

Come on Downtown for a twist on our Super Smash Brothers Brawl Throwdown.

All-Ages Mario Kart Tournament

Sunday September 21, 2014: 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

This event is intended for all ages.

It's a Mario Kart 8 Tourney for kids, teens AND adults! Bring the family for an afternoon of fun!

African Culture: A Royal Perspective

Wednesday September 24, 2014: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

This event will be recorded

AADL is proud to welcome two members of African Royalty who will offer their perspectives on the culture of their country in this special lecture, cosponsored by AADL, the UM Center for World Performance Studies and the U-M Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments.

Nana Kwadwo Nyantakyi III (Sanaahene or Chief of the Treasury in the Asante Kingdom) and Nana Afia Adoma II (Queen of Antoa-Krobo in the Asante Kingdom) will discuss African Akan and Asante culture.

This lecture is part of a month-long artist residency sponsored by the Center for World Performance Studies. A related lecture on Royal Instruments and Music of West Africa will also be held at the Downtown Library on Wednesday, October 8.

Nana Kwadwo Nyantakyi III -Having served three kings in Ghana, Otumfuo Agyeman Prempeh II, Otumfuo Opoku Ware II, and currently Otumfuo Osei Tutu II, Nana Kwadwo Nyantakyi III has accumulated and extraordinary wealth of knowledge of Akan and Asante culture and will provide fascinating insights.

Nana Afia Adoma II - As a matrilineal society, Akan Queens are entrusted with lineage history, values, the complex political hierarchy, and succession procedures.

The African-American Cultural & Historical Museum Of Washtenaw County Living Oral History Project

Sunday September 28, 2014: 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

Join us the AADL and the African American Cultural & Historical Museum of Washtenaw County for this premiere of their Phase II of the Living Oral History Project. The African American Cultural & Historical Museum of Washtenaw County began this project in March 2013 in collaboration with AADL. This second phase was filmed in May 2014,

Five individuals were identified to initiate the project by participating in a series of interviews that were professionally filmed and edited. These interviews serve as a roadmap to what African Americans witnessed, experienced, shared, and contributed in building the community we see today. Those interviewed for the second phase include John Barfield, Sr., Tessie Freeman, Barbara Meadows, Paul Wasson, and Dorothy Wilson. A short program and an opportunity to speak with those interviewed will follow the premiere.

The individuals selected represent a broad section in gender, education, faith, and socioeconomics. Areas of community concern such as race, gender and education equality, faith, housing, employment, community building activities, and infrastructure were presented and discussed. These topics provide a spectrum that is relevant to current issues and concerns within Washtenaw County today and into the future.

This premiere of this second phase of the Living Oral History Project will include a short program and an opportunity to speak with those interviewed. Light refreshments will also be served.

Bright Nights Community Forum:The Impact of Academic Stress on Student Mental Health

Tuesday September 30, 2014: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

Some level of stress is a part of everyone’s life, but almost 40 percent of parents say their high-school student is experiencing a great deal of stress from school, according to an NPR poll conducted with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health. In most cases, that stress is from academics, not social issues or bullying, the poll found. Teenagers say they're suffering, too. A study by the American Psychological Association found that nearly half of all teens — 45 percent — said they were stressed by school pressures.

“Everyday stress” is a normal reaction to a variety of situations that we encounter in the real world, and can even be beneficial, motivating us to accomplish a task, or to avoid a situation that might be harmful. However chronic stress can lead to long-term health issues, affecting both physical and mental health – and can also negatively impact school performance, extracurricular activities, and relationships with family and friends. While it’s not possible to completely remove all of the stress from our lives, the good news is that there are strategies that students (and their parents!) can use to help manage their stress and improve academic performance.

To learn more about the impact of academic stress on student mental health, including strategies to prevent and manage stress, the University of Michigan Depression Center and the Ann Arbor District Library will present a Bright Nights community forum entitled, “The Impact of Academic Stress on Student Mental Health” on Tuesday, September 30, from 7:00-8:30 p.m. in the 4th Floor Meeting Room of the downtown Ann Arbor District Library (corner of S. Fifth Ave. and William).

Elizabeth Koschmann, PhD, Research Investigator in the U-M Department of Psychiatry and a member of the U-M Depression Center, will give a brief overview presentation outlining the connections between stress, anxiety and depression, and providing useful strategies to help relieve stress. This will be followed by questions and discussion with a panel of experts including Kate Fitzgerald, MD, Assistant Professor, U-M Department of Psychiatry; Amy McLoughlin, EdM, Counselor at Skyline High School; and Tom Atkins, MD, a private practice clinician in Ann Arbor.

Bright Nights is open to the public and there is no charge for attendance. For more information, please visit the Depression Center website at www.depressioncenter.org, or contact Trish Meyer, 763-7495, or meyerpa@umich.edu