Worldly Bits - Romani People

A History Of The Romani People is a NEW book on how Romani people live in Europe. You learn about these interesting people through photos, maps, and clear description. Wouldn't you wish to live in one of the painted wagon houses? Add music to the experience with the compact disc Latcho Drom. The documentary VHS Latcho Drom: Safe Journey is a memorable music and dance journey that follows Romani people from their origins in Rajasthan, as they blend cultures through Europe and North Africa.

Baby Bits - Two Beauties

Two beautiful books for toddlers and adults to enjoy together are Walk On! A Guide For Babies Of All Ages and Mama's Day.

Calling All Manga Fans

It is nearing that time of year again where we at the library are thinking about programming for the fall.

Okay I have a few questions for you:
Did you like that the Animanga Club met on a Saturday?
Is a weekend meeting best for during the school year?
What anime/manga do you want to see/discuss at Animanga Club?
Did you like DDR at the meeting?

I know summer just started and you all are thinking about going on vacation and which prize you want to win in the summer reading game, but let me know what you think.
P.S. Who has a great trip planned for this summer?

Charles de Lint's latest tales from Newford

Charles de Lint's latest novel, Widdershins, was released last month and has received many positive reviews, including a starred review from Booklist. This novel continues the story of Jilly Coppercorn from de Lint's 2002 novel, The Onion Girl. In Widdershins, Jilly continues to recover from the car crash that left her crippled. She also struggles to come to terms with the inside of her own mind which still has not healed from deep childhood traumas. The story takes place as conflicts between the fairies and the native spirits threaten to a bring a war upon the world. De Lint encourages the reader to consider the environmental impact of humans and to analyze the relationships between both men and nations.

Do you like trivia? Want to impress your friends with new facts?

Well check out the many interesting fact books that the New York Public Library has published! To start off we have the fascinating series of New York Public Library answer books for kids. This series includes books such as The New York Public Library amazing African American history : a book of answers for kids and also Amazing women in American history : a book of answers for kids. Other books in the series provide answers about Space, Hispanic American History, Native American History, and Mythology.

Are you an adult? Do not be dismayed! This wisdom isn't only available for kids. The New York Public Library also published interesting materials for adults, such as The New York Public Library book of twentieth-century American quotations and The New York Public Library literature companion.

Can your Tuba do this?

Flaming Tuba

David Silverman, director of the Simpsons, has created a sousaphone that spurts flames when you play it. Video

I wonder what Mr. Leach would say...
Via BoingBoing

Road Trip

Why not spend the hours traveling to your vacation spot listening to someone else's travelogue? Start with a masterpiece, Blue Highways by William Least-Heat-Moon, a journey across the backroads of America. Visit Whynot, Mississippi and Remote, Oregon with one of the best storytellers out there. The Ride of Our Lives brings together three generations of NBC correspondent Mike Leonard's family on a road trip across the states to meet the first member of the family's 4th generation. If you're still in the car (our sympathies) here's a quick list of recommended listening: Feet on the Street, A Year in the World and City of Falling Angels.

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (6/25/06)

John Updike found a new subject for his latest novel in a New Jersey neighborhood, a world away from Rabbit. In a recent BookExpo interview Updike said, "I was excited by having an 18-year-old hero and by trying to present, through him, the terrorist point of view...The fact that it is about terrorism, among other things, and that you do have sinister, thriller-like elements gave me some energy, too. I used to read a lot of mystery novels and some thrillers; it's a genre that I'm not unhappy with when I find myself in it."

At #4 is The Rapture by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins: this third prequel is another back to the beginning in the Left Behind Series.

At #6 is The Saboteurs by W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV: the Men at War series also continues; this adventure involves the derring-do of O.S.S. agents during World War II.

At #8 is Terrorist by John Updike: Updike writes for the first time about the post-9/11 world; he explores the life of a discontented high school boy attracted to the teachings of a radical iman.

At#15 is Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen: an old man looks back on his rollicking good times with a traveling circus during the Depression.

And the Award for Most Annoying Film Character Ever Goes to...

...Jar Jar Binks, according to a poll of 5,000 movie fans on the UK movie rental site LoveFilm.com. Mr. Binks beat out many other contenders, including Andie MacDowell's Carrie from Four Weddings And A Funeral. Rowan Atkinson's Mr. Bean took third place, Jim Carrey's Ace Ventura: Pet Detective came in fourth, and Ben Stiller's White Goodman in Dodgeball came in fifth.

My Father's Shop by Satomi Ichikawa

Mustafa's father sells carpets in Morocco. He tells his son that he must learn different languages in order to be successful in their trade. Mustafa becomes bored and races through the village wearing a damaged carpet his father gave him. He is soon followed by a rooster and meets tourists who teach him how to speak as the roosters do in their country. His father is pleased that his son has learned to speak different languages. My Father's Shop is a fun romp through a Moroccan village.

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