Three authors were born on this day

birthdays

Three authors were born on May 8.

David Attenborough turns 80 today. He is a naturalist and an astute observer of the world around us. Two of his most popular titles are: The Living Planet: A Portrait of the Earth and The Trials of Life: A Natural History of Animal Behavior.

The late Peter Benchley, best known for scaring the hooty out of us and keeping us out of the water with Jaws, would have been 66 today. He died February 11, 2006, of pulmonary fibrosis.

Thomas Pynchon, author of several challenging novels, turns 69. Just how many of us have actually finished Gravity's Rainbow or V.?

Celebrating Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

What do comedienne Margaret Cho, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, cabinet member Norman Mineta, golfer Tiger Woods, and Yahoo! co-founder Jerry Yang have in common?

Each of these well-known public figures is part of the vast, diverse group of Americans who claim either full or partial Asian heritage. May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and the library has plenty of materials for those interested in learning more about the history and impact of Asian Americans.

Here are a few highlights from the collection:
Strangers from a Different Shore: A History of Asian Americans
Columbia Guide to Asian American History
Asian American Century
Dragon Ladies: Asian American Feminists Breathe Fire
Q and A: Queer in Asian America
Asian Americans: An Interpretive History

Jeanne Birdsall’s Coming to Town!

The National Book Award winning author of The Penderwicks will be joining many enthusiastic readers at the Ann Arbor Book Festival on Saturday, May 13th at 12:00 pm. This delightful romp for kids is the perfect summer read!

Food: Recent Writings on Food, Eating, and Cooking

Eat This Book: a Year of Gluttony and Glory on the Competitive Eating Circuit by Ryan Nerz
Insatiable: Tales from a Life of Delicious Excess by Gael Greene, the longtime food columnist for New York magazine
The Nasty Bits: Collected Varietal Cuts, Usable Trim, Scraps, and Bones, an assemblage of anecdotes arranged by tastes: salty, sweet, sour, bitter, and umami, by Anthony Bourdain
The Omnivore’s Dilemma: a Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan
The Reach of a Chef: Beyond the Kitchen by Michael Ruhlman
Sacred Cow, Mad Cow: a History of Food Fears by Madeleine Ferrieres
The Sex Life of Food: When Body and Soul Meet to Eat by Bunny Crumpacker

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (4/30/06)

Fifty years after Irene Nemirovsky died in the Holocaust, her daughters finally released two novellas they had discovered in her papers. This unique and poignant legacy was first published last year in France and was a huge bestseller. Nemirovsky had emigrated as a child to Paris after the Russian Revolution and was living there with her own family when the Germans invaded in 1940. In the novellas she captures both the immediate moment and reflects on the historical truth of the terrible chaos that ended in her transportation to Auschwitz and death. For more on this new American bestseller check out this news article:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2004/10/23/wfran23.xml&sSheet=/news/2004/10/23/ixworld.html

At #2 is Dark Harbor by Stuart Woods: Stone Barrington returns to investigate the death of his cousin.

At #3 is Oakdale Confidential by Anonymous: the author is blogging discontent about lack of credit for this bestselling novelization of a TV soap mystery.

At #4 is Dark Tort by Diane Mott Davidson: And caterer Goldy Schulz is back investigating the death of a paralegal.

At #8 is Chasing Destiny by Eric Jerome Dickey: another romantic entanglement runs into trouble when the woman becomes pregnant and the man is married.

At #11 is Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky: this week's literary bestseller.

For those of you who haven't yet trashed your VCRs

The Morocco Experience

An exciting deviation from the average travel documentary, this Lonely Planet production attempts to recreate the overall tone of their popular guidebooks and website. Hosted by an adventurous back-packer, we get to see first-hand what it's like to hitch-hike on a mountain farm truck, barter services and goods at the local markets, accept invitations from locals to join them for home-cooked meals, and even ride a camel. Throughout his journey, our host speaks with many fellow travelers representing a wide range of cultures, male and female, young and old. This is a terrific source for when planning a Moroccan escape, and an even better source when you just need a 47 minute escape in the comfort of your own home. The Morocco Experience is vicarious living at its finest.

Mr. Williams by Karen Barbour

Mr. Williams is a biography of a man who grew up on a farm in Arcadia, Louisiana. He was born the same year as Martin Luther King Jr. and when Calvin Coolidge was president. In simple text, Karen Barbour captures the life of Mr. Williams as it was told to her when she was a little girl.

Hip Knits

Knitgrrl: Learn to Knit With 15 Fun and Funky Patterns, (starred review in School Library Journal), and the new Knitgrrl 2 are decidedly not your grandmother's knitting books. They are designed for teens and tweens, but is appropriate for beginning knitters of all ages.

The author, Shannon Okey's blog and website are chatty and loads of fun. Check them out.

She will join fellow knitter Jillian Moreno at the Ann Arbor Book Festival, May 13, at 11:00 a.m. for a program, followed by signing.

Stick around the Festival and come cheer for Shannon at 4 p.m. at the Library Pavilion for the 3rd Annual Celebrity Spelling Bee. We expect great things from this past district champ.

Knitting for Real Women with Real Curves

O.k. Don't trust me. However, listen to what Sally Melville has to say about Big Girl Knits by Ann Arbor author Jillian Moreno.

"I love this book! It brought tears to my eyes—both with its delicious humor and its loving attention to the subject. The technical stuff is handled wonderfully—with intelligence and clarity and a big heart. The variety in the patterns that follow is a delight."

Debbie Stoller, author of the Stitch ’n Bitch series "...guarantee(s) that (with Big Girl Knit) you’ll never again knit a sweater that makes your big top look like The Big Top."

Jillian will join another hip knitter, Shannon Okey at the Lifestyle Pavilion on May 13th, 11:00 a.m. at the Ann Arbor Book Festival. You can check out Jillian's blog in the meantime.

Hullabaloo!

Hullabaloo

Current magazine says this “rousing band indulges in hip-shaking ska, Latin, and rock.” I’d add swing and rockabilly to that mix, but whatever you call it, Hullabaloo is sheer energy and fun. They play at T.C.’s Speakeasy in Ypsi on Saturday night. If you can’t wait that long, try one of Hullabaloo’s CDs from the Library collection.

Syndicate content