Play! A Video Game Symphony - July 12, Orchestra Hall, Detroit

Video game... symphony? To many people, especially those who remember well the blips and bloops of the 8-bit era chiptune, video game music has come a long way. Coming a year after the popular Dear Friends: Music From Final Fantasy concert, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and conductor Arnie Roth, Play! showcases symphonic arrangements and pieces from games such as Super Mario Brothers, Halo, The Legend of Zelda, and Kingdom Hearts.

This concert is for people who get nostalgic over old consoles, cutting-edge gamers who know the soundtracks to their favorite games by heart, and for people who wonder just how video game music could manage to rise to symphony status.

Artful Reading

May Ray, Ernst, Duchamp = DADA? Yes, but not quite the whole story.
Daughters of DADA at Francis M. Naumann Fine Art is currently showcasing the works of 6 DADA women artists, and “adds a crucial chapter to the current DADA exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art”, writes Holland Cotter, art reviewer of the New York Times.

Perhaps the most outrageous and original among them is the Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. With her tin-can bra and shaved head, she treated her body as a living work of art, causing historians today to recognize her preeminence as America’s first performance artist.

Holy Skirts by Rene Steinke is a vivid imagining of Elsa’s story – from her days in Berlin’s seedy burlesques, her many marriages and affairs, to her life among the bohemia of Greenwich Village. Intelligent and sensual, this highy readable novel is a finalist of the 2005 National Book Award.

Buckminster Fuller- Renaissance Man

bucky

eum].

July 12 is the 101st birthday of Buckminster Fuller, architect, inventor, engineer and philosopher. Fuller is best known for his invention of the geodesic dome, one of the most revolutionary structural inventions of the twentieth century. Fuller was a rare combination of the romantic and the scientist, one who believed in the possibility of the impossible and with the technical knowledge to bring dreams to fruition. Check out one of his other inventions, the dymaxion house at the Henry Ford Museum.

Grand Jury Prize winners

Prepare for Wednesday's program on the Sundance Film Festival by watching the following Grand Jury Prize winners since 2000:

2000: Girlfight and You Can Count on Me
2001: The Believer
2002: Personal Velocity
2003: American Splendor
2004: Primer
2005: Forty Shades of Blue (on order)

New Books to Film

The Play Ground

The Play Ground

Gotta "Love Me Tender" or at least, love that Michigan Elvisfest on Saturday, July 7th and 8th at Riverside Park located in Ypsilanti's Historic Depot Town. This is the largest Elvis tribute concert in North America! So, shake, rattle and roll with award-winning Elvis tribute artists and Las Vegas impersonators. Events for kids also. "Don't Be Cruel" and wear your "Blue Suede Shoes" to Ypsi this weekend. Friday, July 7, 5 PM - Midnight and Saturday, July 8, Noon to Midnight.

How about a trip to Canada, eh?

If you are looking for new places to explore this summer, why not try a trip to Canada? The border is only a short drive away and there are plenty of things to see and do for a weekend. Try visiting Toronto and go to the AGO (Art Gallery of Ontario) or celebrate Summerlicious, prix fixe meals at the city's best restaurants during July. If you have more time, try driving as far as Montreal and visit the Just for Laughs Festival. For more ideas of places to visit and things to do in Canada, be sure to check out our Canada guide books or an adventurer's guide (for the outdoor types).

Did He or Didn’t He?

That’s usually a question for the detective in the book to answer, not the reader of the book. But Vince Lardo’s follow-ups to the very dead mystery writer Lawrence Sanders Archie McNally books have readers debating whether Vince ghostwrote them all.

Listen to all our McNally mysteries on book on cd and decide for yourself. Start with a few Sanders wrote (or didn’t) like McNally’s Secret, McNally’s Risk or McNally’s Caper. Then try a few of the Lardo titles beginning with McNally’s Dilemma and our latest addition to the series, McNally’s Bluff.

Ken Lay, ex-CEO of Enron, is dead

Ken Lay

Ken Lay, convicted ex-CEO of Enron, has died.

Lay, 64, was awaiting sentencing on multiple counts of fraud, conspiracy and bank fraud, when he died of a massive coronary in Aspen, Colorado.

In his book, Conspiracy of Fools: A True Story, two-time Pulitzer finalist author Kurt Eichenwald, chronicles the stunning rise and devastating fall of Enron under Ken Lay's leadership.

Last year's documentary, Enron, the Smartest Guys in the Room, directed by Alex Gibney, exposes in shocking video and audio tapes, the depth of the greed and corruption that was part of the upper echelon culture. This much-touted documentary, which was nominated for and/or won several awards, spells out in heartbreaking detail, the thousands of lives wrecked by Enron's collapse.

A tortoise's observations of the human species and much more

Verlyn Klinkenborg, author of other books on the natural world and writer on the editorial board of the New York Times, has created a most disarming tortoise in his latest, Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile. In this wondrous tale or meditation, full of luxuriant language, humor and wry observation of the human species, Timothy in her elder years (yes, it's a female) is resident in the garden of pastor and amateur naturalist, Gilbert White, author, in real life, of The Natural History and Antiquities of Selbourne, the village where he lived.

Syndicate content