Embracing Eatonville at UMMA Off/Site

EMbracing EatonvilleEMbracing Eatonville

There is still time to visit the photography exhibition Embracing Eatonville at the University of Michigan Musuem of Art Off/Site (through March 18th).

Located in Orange County, Florida, Eatonville was the first incorporated African-American community in the nation. Today, it is perhaps best known for its annual showcase of arts, literature and culture that celebrates native daughter Zora Neale Hurston.

The current exhibition "celebrates the spirit and character of Eatonville through the work of contemporary photographers Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, each of whom have created a new body of work for this exhibition as they explore the importance of place to individual and collective identity".

Reading in a Magazine about Google's Book Project

Jeffrey Toobin is one of my favorite writers, so I was immediately drawn to his article “Google’s Moon Shot: The Quest for the Universal Library” in the Feb. 5 issue of The New Yorker magazine. You, too, can read about what Google is doing with its book digitization project in Ann Arbor and elsewhere, just by picking up this issue of The New Yorker from one of our libraries -- or read the article at The New Yorker web site.

Thomas Lynch: “I’d rather it be February”

Now that the month is almost over, brace yourself and read (or re-read)
Thomas Lynch’s wonderful essay “Tract,” in which he wishes that February might turn out to be the month of his funeral. “With the cold behind and the cold before you and the darkness stubborn at the edges of the day. . . And a wind to make the cold more bitter. So that ever after it might be said, 'It was a sad old day we did it after all . . . '" This essay is in The Undertaking: Life Studies from the Dismal Trade for which Lynch – Milford’s famous undertaker and writer - won the American Book Award in 1998.

Onlies Write Fascinating Family Stories

As the mother of a solo son, I thoroughly enjoyed Only Child: Writers on the Singular Joys and Solitary Sorrows of Growing Up Solo edited by (only children) Deborah Siegel and Daphne Uviller. These essays – divided into Childhood, Significant Others and Friends, Parenting, and Tables Turned – are both entertaining and enlightening. Among my favorites was “My Jane,” by U-M’s Peter Ho Davies. At the end of the book I was left wondering, not for the first time, whether solo sons and daughters may be just as psychologically diverse as those who grow up with siblings.

Consider this: Christopher Guest + Documentaries = Funny

Forget your average documentaries. Documentaries + funny = mockumentaries. Christopher Guest has directed and co-written his way to perfecting the mockumentary. His latesty knee-slapper is For Your Consideration. The movie is about an indie movie that is being filmed and a buzz begins about one of the performers as a possible Oscar nominee. The film revolves around how the Oscar buzz effects the other members of the cast and production crew. More mockumentaries from Guest's hands, and also available at the library, are Best in Show, A Mighty Wind, and Waiting For Guffman. For extra fun, check out This Is Spinal Tap. Guaranteed laughs!

The Play Ground

The Play GroundThe Play Ground

Midori has been playing the violin for 24 years though she is only in her mid-30s. A true child prodigy, her career was launched at age 11 when she was invited by Zubin Mehta to appear as a guest solist for the New York Philharmonic's New Year's Eve celebration in 1982. She made her University Musical Society debut at age 19 during the 1991 May Festival and was last here in 2004. Midori is a passonate educator and devotes a good portion of her time to five organizations she has founded, dedicated to improving access to great music. Hill Auditorium, Sunday, March 11 at 4pm.

Jackie's Bat by Marybeth Larbiecki

Jackie Robinson is playing for the Brooklyn Dodgers for the very first time. The batboy is told by his papa that “it aint’ right, a white boy serving a black man,” but Jackie goes on to earn the respect of his team, the fans and the batboy. Told from the point of view of Jackie Robinson’s batboy Marybeth Larbiecki scores a big one in Jackie’s Bat.

Wow! More Gospel!

Wow Gospel 2007Wow Gospel 2007

Hey, guess what? WOW Gospel 2007 is in! You should also check out the rest of the WOW Gospel Series... but don't ask what happened to the year 2004... don't even think about asking...

But you're welcome to submit a suggestion to add the 2004 (and 2001, 2000, 1998) back in the collection! Please!?!?

Go Team Go!

oaktreeoaktree

Let’s put the trees back in Tree Town. Join a Tree Team and help replant trees lost in Ann Arbor due to the emerald ash borer infestation. Volunteers interested in forming a neighborhood or school area Tree Team, please call Global ReLeaf at 800-642-7353 or visit their website to register a team.

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (2/18/07)

This week there are new contenders vying for the publishing world's equivalent of the golden ring. Can they be the next Da Vinci Code?

At #3 is The Alexandria Link by Steve Berry: "A former Justice Department operative turned bookseller hides a link to the secrets of the vanished library of Alexandria from wealthy international thugs."

At #7 is Deep Storm by Lincoln Child: "A doctor investigates diseases at an ocean-floor research facility that may have discovered the ruins of Atlantis."

At #9 is Hide by Lisa Gardner: "Bobby Dodge, a former sniper with the Massachusetts State Police, now a detective, unravels a mystery that begins with the discovery of six corpses beneath a state mental hospital."

At #10 is Allegiance by Timothy Zahn: "Events that occurred between “A New Hope” and “The Empire Strikes Back” : a “Star Wars” novel."

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