AgathaFest

She’s the first name in mystery; the last word in cozies and some of Agatha Christie’s best have been reissued in book on cd. Five titles recently added to our audio collection are Murder in Mesopotamia, The Man in the Brown Suit, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Cards on the Table and Death on the Nile.

New Courses from the Teaching Company

Jesus

Fans of the Teaching Company’s books on cd lecture courses will be happy to note the arrival of some timely and topical titles. Biblical scholar Bart D. Ehrman of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill delivers our latest group: The Historical Jesus, From Jesus to Constantine, The New Testament, After the New Testament and The History of the Bible.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #23

With a poet’s sensibility and a Southern writer’s gift of storytelling Darnell Arnoult’s (website) accomplished first novel Sufficient Grace is moving, captivating, and destined to be in a few beach bags this summer. (Starred review in Publishers Weekly).

Character-rich and evocative of place, this is the story of Gracie Hollaman and her two very different Southern families – the white, middleclass one that she abandoned and the black one that took her in and allowed her to develop a special gift. Written with warmth and gentle humor, this novel is also about grit, dignity, and about lives reclaimed with faith and love.

For readers of Kaye Gibbons’ Charms for The Easy Life (1993); Clyde Edgerton’s Walking Across Egypt, (1987); and Lee Smith’s Fair and Tender Ladies, (1988).

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (5/28/06)

Summer begins this Memorial Day weekend for me. Time to start thinking about books to pack for the beach and cottage or just to enjoy while lazing in the back yard. While it may never make the List, I just finished an absolutely wonderful, spellbinding novel. Black Swan Green is the latest by David Mitchell, a critically acclaimed young British author, and I cannot recommend it enough.

At #14 is Bad Twin by Gary Troup:"Remember the manuscript that Hurley (Jorge Garcia, left) found in a suitcase a few episodes ago on Lost? Now you can read it: Bad Twin is a mystery novel by "Gary Troup," who was supposedly aboard the ill-fated Oceanic Flight 815 (real author: unknown). The book, sanctioned by the hit ABC show's producers, could be a treasure chest of possible Lost clues. Or not." (Entertainment Weekly)

At #16 is Second Sight by Amanda Quick: another romantic thriller by this dependable best-selling author; this time the danger threatens a psychic Victorian photographer.

How To Be

by Lisa Brown.

How to be a snake. How to be a bear. How to be a dog. These are important things, people. When reading this book I could not help thinking to myself, "yes! Oh my goodness! That's exactly how I would be a spider!" This cute book is all about creative pretending (with a little bit about learning about yourself thrown in), and they nail it perfectly...

Golden Age of Magic...

...stage magic, that is. Anyone with even a passing interest in the magicians of the 1920s (or anyone who just wants to read a good historical mystery) should try out Carter Beats the Devil, by Glen David Gold. The action starts when Warren Harding (generally considered to be the worst president in American history) is torn apart (then eaten, by a lion, on stage, in front of a live audience) during a trick called "Carter Beats the Devil", performed by the famous magician Carter the Great. Though it is revealed to be just a another clever illusion (and the President is clearly seen walking off stage after), Harding is found dead a few hours later, and the police would like to have a word or two with Carter...

Death Becomes Them

Dead or Alive

AADL Select Sites : Reference Tools

A macabre site for the morbidly curious, Dead or Alive? features the vital status of “reasonably famous people” from all walks of life: sports stars, scientists, politicians, movie stars and more. A mysterious administrator obsessively updates the site, which to date catalogues 7430 people, more of them listed alive than dead. View site statistics and deaths arranged by cause (more “reasonably famous” people have been killed by volcanic eruption (3) than balloon crash (1), for example), or compare the status of people in different fields. If perusing the lists does not prove addictive enough, the site features quizzes that regenerate every 15 minutes.

Should accuracy concern you, the site claims to have made only one confirmed mistake in the status of a person in three years.

Jesse Owens Remembered

On May 25, 1935, Jesse Owens set three world records and tied a fourth. Representing Ohio State at the Big Ten track and field event at the University of Michigan, despite an ailing back, Owens tied the world record in the 100 yard dash and set the record in the broad jump, the 220 yard dash and 220 yard low hurdles. This was the first time anyone had ever set three world records and broke a fourth Jesse was born in 1913, the son of a sharecropper, and grew up in Cleveland. He began competing in track and field in high school. His second claim to fame was winning four gold metals at the 1936 Olympic Games in Nazi Germany. Owens went on to become an accomplished speaker and supported athletic programs for underprivileged youth.

Michigan Field Guides

With Memorial Day and summer vacations just ahead, these field guides will enrich your hikes, bike rides, and camping trips.

Birds: National Geographic Field Guide to Birds: Michigan
Mammals: Mammals of Michigan Field Guide by Stan Tekiela
Reptiles and Amphibians:
Reptiles and Amphibians of Michigan Field Guide by Stan Tekiela
Michigan Turtles and Lizards by James H. Harding and J. Alan Holman
Michigan Frogs, Toads, and Salamanders by James H. Harding and J. Alan Holman
Michigan Snakes by J. Alan Holman
Insects: Insects of the Great Lakes Region by Gary A. Dunn
Butterflies: Michigan Butterflies and Skippers by Mogens C. Nielsen
Butterflies of Michigan Field Guide by Jaret C. Daniels
Fish: Fishes of the Great Lake Region by Carl L. Hubbs
Trees: Michigan Trees by Burton V. Barnes and Warren H. Wagner
Trees of Michigan by Linda Kershaw
Wild Flowers: Michigan Wildflowers in Color by Harry C. Lund
Wildflowers of Michigan Field Guide by Stan Tekiela
Stars: Michigan Starwatch by Mike Lynch

A Marriage Made in History

Modern marriage may seem to be in flux, but most of what we see today has been seen before, according to Stephanie Coontz whose book Marriage, a History: From Obedience to Intimacy, or How Love Conquered Marriage is featured this week in five-minute e-mail chunks at DearReader.com. The book came out in hardback a year ago and in paperback in February. Coontz also wrote the popular 1992 book The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap.

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