Be a Deer and Join Us!

David Small and Sarah Stewart are coming to the Downtown library this weekend—are you prepared? Brush up on their charming blend of timeless watercolor illustrations and heartwarming tales of books, plants and… antlers? My personal favorite of the bunch, Imogene’s Antlers follows the resilient main character through her daily routine with a spontaneously acquired pair of antlers. Both written and illustrated by David Small, the delightfully matter-of-fact text juxtaposes hysterically with the images of Imogene’s unusual predicament. If you don’t happen to get a copy in time, never fear—Nicola’s Books will be on-hand at the event.

Yost and the 'Big House' at 'Sunday Edition'

Michigan Stadium is one of Ann Arbor's significant landmarks and much in the news these days. But what's the story behind how it was originally built? Find out on Sunday, November 12 at 2:00 p.m. at the Malletts Creek Branch library when Robert Soderstrom talks about his fascinating book The Big House: Fielding H. Yost and the building of Michigan Stadium. A U-M graduate and lifelong fan of the Wolverines, the author will talk about the early history of the stadium and present early photographs illustrating its development. The program is part of the library's 'Sunday Edition' monthly book talk series.

Ann Arbor's 15th Tellabration

The Ann Arbor Storytellers Guild is bringing Elizabeth Ellis from Dallas to town for eight days of performances and workshops. The kickoff is this coming Saturday at 7:30 p.m. at St. Clare's/Temple Beth Emeth (2309 Packard).

Tickets for an Evening of Storytelling for Grownups are $8 at the door. Other performers on the program are guild members Jeff Doyle, Rob McCabe, and Carol Pranschke.

Check out the rest of the workshops and programs that are planned for the entire week.

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (11/12/06)

Stephen King has written his first love story. The King of Scarey Stories said he was really afraid of his fans' reactions to his latest book. He need not have worried. His bittersweet romance entered the List at #1.

At #1 is Liseys' Story by Stephen King: the widow of a famous novelist who suffered from horrifying memories grapples with grief on her way to a new life. Is this a case of autobiographical projection?

At #6 is Hundred-Dollar Baby by Robert B. Parker: in the latest Spenser mystery the beautiful teenage runaway that our modern knight errant rescued twice (Ceremony and Taming a Sea-Horse) years ago asks for his help once again.

At #10 is First Impressions by Nora Roberts: this is a reprint of a 1984 romance. But everything this prolific author writes is publishing gold.

At #13 is Road of the Patriarch by R.A. Salvatore: this is Book 3 of the Sellswords fantasy series, and another winner for this popular author.

Homework Bits - Immigration to the USA

Take an interactive tour of Ellis Island with video clips and more at Scholastic.com. Books the Library owns are Ellis Island, I Was Dreaming To Come To America, and Liberty Rising: the Story Of The Statue Of Liberty.

Get your Library Card registered online so you can get into the Library databases from home. Then you can read Magazine articles that support school reports! Kids InfoBits can be found on the Library website under the research tab.

Homework Bits - Career Some Day?

Are you in Grades 3 thru 6 and looking into what career might be for you? The following sights were listed in November 2006 LibrarySparks Journal. Explore personal interests and introduce yourself to related careers.
Take a look at GetTech Careers and Kids Work!.

Kid Bits - Sailing and Whaling

Preschool Storytimes are back in session. They begin this week and will go thru the week of December 15, 2006. Beware of Holiday Closings during this schedule!!

Books that are fun with a "Sailing and Whaling" theme, are Ten Little Fish, Fish Eyes: A Book You Can Count On, Burt Dow Deep Water Man a classic whale tale, and Loud Emily.

Doggishly good books

On NPR Nancy Pearl has noted that in the past year nonfiction books about dogs have been very popular. Many of the titles she recommends are available at the library. For a doggishly good read, check out one of these titles:
Timbuktu by Paul Auster
Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck
City by Clifford Simak
Skippyjon Jones by Judith Byron Schachner
Lucky in the Corner by Carol Anshaw
Foreign Affairs by Alison Lurie

And check out the NPR story for a recording of Nancy Pearl reading "Golden Retrievals," a poem by Mark Doty.

Give 'Em a Gold Star

The City of Ann Arbor took home a 2006 Gold Star from Michigan’s Promoting Active Communities Collaborative for encouraging residents to get out and get moving. Our favorite reason Ann Arbor won? The Border-to-Border Trail that links AA with Ypsi and beyond. The City also won for making Getting Downtown healthy for you and the environment. Congratulations.

Let Them Eat History

It’s easy to admire Kirsten Dunst’s acting in Marie Antoinette – but it’s also admirable that plenty of educational asides on the history of the French and American revolutions found their way into Sofia Coppola’s new film. Check out reviews at metacritic, including this one from The Christian Science Monitor: “Freighted by its contentious reception at Cannes, writer-director Sofia Coppola's "Marie Antoinette" is destined to become this year's love-it-or-hate-it movie. Is it OK to say I merely liked it a lot?” The film continues this week at Quality 16 theater on Jackson Road. At the library we have loads of good books and films about the last queen of France, including the popular new book Abundance:A Novel of Marie Antoinette by Sena Jeter Naslund.

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