Parent’s Corner: Reading

The Parent Shelf is located in the downtown youth area, and on this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from homework to potty training to time-outs to bullying. These books are available for checkout and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf.”

There are some great books in the collection that focus on books and reading, including choosing what to read and how to help encourage children to read. To get you going, check out these titles:

Silly Books to Read Aloud

Reading in the wild: The book Whisperer's Keys to Cultivating Llifelong Reading Habits

Diversity in Youth Literature: Opening Doors Through Reading

Book love: Developing Depth, Stamina, and Passion in Adolescent Readers

For additional resources on kids and reading , check out this longer list of parent shelf titles.

The Warren Commission Report is an awesome graphic novel!

I sat down to read The Warren Commission Report: A Graphic Investigation into the Kennedy Assassination, and finished it in one sitting. I loved it! I didn't know too much about the JFK assassination prior to reading this super-cool graphic novel, and it was so great to learn about it and its aftermath through Dan Mishkin's carefully chosen language and information, accompanied by the beautiful art of Ernie Colon and Ann Arbor resident Jerzy Drozd. This book details the events of the assassination itself, the findings of the Warren Commission, and explores the controversies and conspiracy theories that still surround the event. The book "speaks to theorists and skeptics alike, breaking down how decisions made in the days that followed the assassination not only shaped the way the commission reconstructed events, but also fostered the conspiracy theories that play a part in American politics to this day," reads the jacket, and I agree wholeheartedly. I appreciated that the book was not the least bit didactic, but simply well-researched and presented clearly and concisely.

If you're at all interested in learning more about the JFK assassination, I would highly recommend starting with this fantastic graphic novel.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #508

January brings a number of terrific debut novels. The one I am most excited to share is Unbecoming by Rebecca Scherm (MFA, Helen Zell Writers Program at the University of Michigan). Follow her on Facebook, and plan to attend her signing @ Literati, 7pm on January 27.

She calls herself Julie now, from California. For the past 2 years, Grace restores bric-a-brac, repairs antiques and jewelry in a Paris chop shop, and lives alone in a shabby room. Regularly, she checks the Garland (TN) newspaper online for news of a case involving robbery of The Wynne House, a local heritage estate and museum, and the two young men caught for the crime, a heist that Grace meticulously engineered. Now, Grace's past and carefully constructed lies are about to catch up with her half way around the world, as the two men are being paroled.

In a series of flashbacks, from small-town USA to the Manhattan art scene, and the backstreets of Europe, we follow the "unbecoming-of-age" of a young woman with a special gift for restoration and for reinventing herself with equal deftness.

"Mesmerizing, nail-biting, atmospheric, and sensual... Unbecoming is an intricately plotted and psychologically nuanced heist novel that turns on suspense and slippery identity."

"Scherm mixes a character study with a caper novel full of double-crosses, lies, and betrayals... She is at her best when describing precious objects: a Dutch master's still life, a James Mont cigar box with hidden compartment, an ornate centerpiece with fanciful fruit and figurines, and silver spoons ignored by their owners but appreciated by the professional hired to evaluate them."

Readers looking for an elegantly well-played cat-and-mouse game should delight in Alfred Hitchcock's To Catch a Thief (1954); The Thomas Crown Affair (1968, and the 1999 remake); and White Collar, the just concluded (sadly) tv series.

Fans of Gillian Flynn who appreciate "(a) bleak tone, deeply flawed protagonist, and dysfunctional relationships" wouldn't want to miss this one. And let's not forget Patricia Highsmith's Ripley novels as read-alikes.

Waiting (not so) patiently for Pioneer Girl: an annotated autobiography by Laura Ingalls Wilder?

Me too! I am crazy about Laura Ingalls Wilder’s books and learning more about her life after the books and her work as a writer. Pioneer Girl was Laura’s first attempt at writing her memoirs, and unlike her beloved Little House series, this book was aimed at adults. Pamela Smith Hill and the South Dakota Historical Society have done an incredible job of filling out Laura’s story - adding details about minor characters she encounters along the way, or explaining how events in this book were later fictionalized and expanded in later works. It’s a dense read, but Laura lovers will be amazed at all the new things there are to learn about her life and times.

While you’re waiting for Pioneer Girl, try:

- William Anderson - William Anderson is a big name in Laura Ingalls Wilder scholarship. Not only has he written multiple books on her, he has helped found and secure some of the home sites and museums, such as at Rocky Ridge, Laura and Almanzo’s home and farm in Missouri. Especially check out The Little House Guidebook and Pioneer Girl: the story of Laura Ingalls Wilder. These were written for a youth audience but any Laura fan will appreciate the historic photos.

- Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink - Caddie Woodlawn is a spunky eleven-year-old tomboy in 1860s Wisconsin, and these stories of her adventures in the woods are based on the stories of the author’s grandmother. This is the nearest readalike to Laura Ingalls Wilder’s own writing in my opinion, and due to episodes of friction between the Native Americans and the settlers, it’s probably shares the most with Little House on the Prairie.

- The Wilder Life by Wendy McClure - Blogger McClure travels from Laura location to Laura location - from wading in the banks of Plum Creek to sleeping in a covered wagon during a hailstorm on the South Dakota prairie - and encountering varieties of Little House fans from lookalike contest competitors to doomsday-prepping butter churners.

- Pioneer Girl by Bich Minh Nguyen - This novel tells the story of Lee Lien, whose childhood is spent crisscrossing the Midwest as her family moves from managing one Asian buffet to another. Now an adult, Lee stumbles upon a family heirloom that may connect her family to Laura Ingalls Wilder’s daughter. In tracing Wilder family history, she makes some discoveries about her own family as well.

- Nothing Daunted by Dorothy Wickenden - This biography of the author’s grandmother tells of two college friends from New York who take on an invitation to become teachers rural Northwest Colorado in 1916 - and enter a whole new world with different social conventions, students who have to ski to class on barrel staves and don’t know who the president is, and the challenge of being the only marriage prospects for miles around.

 

Author Ayelet Waldman Discusses Her Acclaimed New Novel 'Love And Treasure'

Media Player

November 11, 2014 at the Downtown Library, Multi-Purpose Room

Author Ayelet Waldman discusses the inspiration behind her latest novel, "Love and Treasure." Waldman is the author of Red Hook Road, The New York Times bestseller Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, and other popular novels.

"Love and Treasure" is a spellbinding novel of contraband masterpieces, tragic love, and the unexpected legacies of forgotten crimes, weaving a tale around the true history of the Hungarian Gold Train in World War II.

The tale begins in 1945 on the outskirts of Salzburg, when victorious American soldiers capture a train filled with unspeakable riches: piles of fine gold watches; mountains of fur coats; crates filled with wedding rings, silver picture frames, family heirlooms, and Shabbat candlesticks passed down through generations. Jack, a tough, smart New York Jew, is the officer charged with guarding this treasure—a responsibility that grows more complicated when he meets Ilona, a fierce, beautiful Hungarian who has lost everything in the ravages of the Holocaust.

Seventy years later, amid the shadowy world of art dealers who profit off the sins of previous generations, Jack gives a necklace to his granddaughter, Natalie, and charges her with searching for an unknown woman—a woman whose secret may help Natalie to understand her grandfather's guilt - and a way out of the mess she has made of her own life.

This event was cosponsored by AADL and the Jewish Community Center of Greater Ann Arbor as part of the 2014 Jewish Book Festival.

Length: 
00:49:39
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library

Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home, is coming to Ann Arbor

Hugely popular graphic novelist Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic, Are You My Mother? A Comic Drama, and many other graphic novels, will be coming to the Michigan Theater on January 22, 2015. Bechdel's work intertwines political and personal spheres. She uses stories of her father's life before gay rights and her mother's life prior to the women's rights movement to portray intimate images of oppression. In Fun Home, her most popular work, Bechdel shares her personal tales of coming-of-age and coming out in the 1950s and 1960s, under the shadow of her parents' unhappy marriage and nation-wide homophobia.

Bechdel's talk at the Michigan Theater will begin at 5:10pm. The event is free and open to the public. You can read more about Bechdel and the event itself here.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #507 -“In the end these things matter most: How well did you love? How fully did you live? How deeply did you let go?” ~ Gautama Buddha

Before I Go * by Colleen Oakley, given the premise, could have been a sentimental tearjerker but instead, yes, it is heart-wrenching of course, but surprisingly upbeat and life-affirming.

27 year old grad. student Daisy Richmond beat cancer once but on her third "Cancerversary", the cancer is back - Stage IV, aggressive and inoperable. She knows she won't be around for husband Jack's graduation from vet school - something they have worked, sacrificed and delayed their life-plans (kids and vacations) for. What terrifies Daisy most is not dying, but leaving brilliant, domestically-challenged, absent-minded Jack on his own. So instead of planning some "make-a-wish" grown-up getaway for her last days, she is going to find Jack a wife with the time she has left.

With the help of her best friend Kayleigh, Daisy systematically scouts out dog parks (must love dogs) coffee shops and online dating sites looking for the perfect match for Jack. But when it looks like she is way too successful in her quest, Daisy has a change of heart.

Debut novelist Oakley "expertly tugs at the heartstrings with well-rounded characters and a liberal dose of gallows humor."

For readers who enjoyed Hello Goodbye by Emily Chenoweth (a FFF); P.S. I love you by Cecelia Ahern that has been adapted into film; Hannah's List by Debbie Macomber; and Promises to Keep by Jane Green - novels that deal with difficult issues of illnesses and grief, holding on and letting go of the ones we love.

* = starred review

The Boy Who Cried Fabulous!

"When Roger started out for school, his mother set a simple rule. She said, "Now Roger, you go straight-- straight to class and don't be late!" Roger tried hard to obey, he knew that he should not delay. He shouldn't wander or explore, but then he came upon a store..."

In The Boy Who Cried Fabulous by Leslea Newman, Roger is a quirky boy who has trouble going to and from school. The reason? He can't help but become side-tracked by all of the fabulous things he sees! When Roger finds himself late for school (again!), his parents ban him from saying the word 'fabulous' anymore. What will Roger do when he can no longer explore "a world too wondrous to ignore"?

The Boy Who Cried Fabulous is a funny rhyming story about curiosity and accepting others differences. The illustrations are vibrant and bright, and become more and more outlandish as the story continues. Other fabulous titles from Leslea Newman include Donovan's Big Day, Just Like Mama, and Dogs, Dogs, Dogs!

PreK Bits - Q is for Quilt

Ms. Rachel's storytime was brought to you by the letter "Q" this week.

A FAR-FETCHED STORY ends with a "far-fetched story quilt" to keep the family "warm as folklore" through the winter.
"Five Plum Buns In The Bakery Shoppe" is a rhythmic counting poem about disappearing buns in the bakery shoppe.
Each customer enters the shoppe to buy a bun "with a quarter in their hand".
The rhyme is traditional and has been passed down orally. A recorded version was not found in the library.
OWL AT HOME tells of the night there are "Strange Bumps" under Owl's quilt, when he is trying to go to sleep.
Children left with a stamp on their hand of a "quarter moon" smiling at them ....

Here are more stories featuring quilts, since quilts are full of family stories about each patch.
MOOSHKA A QUILT STORY by Julie Paschkis, and The KEEPING QUILT by Patricia Polacco, are Jewish immigrant quilt stories.
PAPA And The PIONEER QUILT by Jean Van Leeuwen, an historical story from the American westward pioneer era.
SHOW WAY by Jaqueline Woodson, an historical story of how quilts led slaves north to freedom.
LUKA'S QUILT by Georgia Guback, an Hawaiian quilt story.
The QUILT by Ann Jonas, of warm memories playing under the quilt.
SAM JOHNSON And The BLUE RIBBON QUILT by Lisa Campbell Ernst, a story of Sam the Farmer who found he enjoys sewing. Now he wishes to join his wife's quilting circle.
So then ... save your favorite scraps and make a quilt that tells YOUR stories.

New TV Shows @ AADL

The library is always acquiring additional TV shows and new seasons of them, be they hot and new, or oldies but goodies. For these new ones you can now get the entire season in one check-out. Hello, binge watching! All the discs are in one case with an extended check-out period. Here are some new series on their way to AADL for the first time:

The Fall, Series 1
DSI Stella Gibson (Gillian Anderson) is a steely detective on the trail of a serial killer stalking the streets of Belfast.

Misfits, Seasons 1-3
Kelly, Nathan, Curtis, Alisha and Simon are five unruly teenagers forced to do community service as payback for their crimes. But when a freak electrical storm hits their town, strange things begin to happen to them that are way out of their control. In fact, they have no idea that they've actually turned into superheroes, each with a power they didn't choose or want. They must save their town from the evil that has descended upon it.

Popular, Seasons 1 & 2
Inside the walls of Kennedy High, there's a war being waged for the most elusive prize of all ... popularity. Samantha MacPherson is an unpopular brainiac. Brooke McQueen is the popular head cheerleader. The two are sworn enemies until Brooke's dad proposes to Sam's mom and the two families begin living together. Sam and Brooke then join forces to break their parents up.

Satisfaction, Season 1
A provocative drama that explores modern marriage at its midpoint. Through the lens of one couple, investment advisor, Neil Truman and his wife, Grace, this series answers the question, 'What do you do when having it all is not enough?' by delving into their shocking and unconventional choices.

Family Tree, Season 1
The story of the 30-year-old Tom Chadwick, an Englishman who has few roots, little family, and an unsure sense of his purpose in life. Tom inherits a mysterious box of belongings from a great-aunt he never met, triggering a passion to investigate his family lineage. As Tom's interest in genealogy grows, his life evolves in unexpected directions, as he uncovers a world of unusual stories and characters in the U.K. and the U.S., as well as a growing sense of who he is and who his real family is.

Republic of Doyle, Seasons 1 & 2
The Canadian mystery features a father and son sleuthing team based in the province of Newfoundland.

Tyrant, Season 1
Al-Fayeed "Barry", the son of a war-torn country's controversial dictator, returns to his homeland after a self-imposed exile in the U.S. But the lives of Barry and his American family are suddenly upended when Barry's volatile brother, Jamal, ascends to the throne. Barry's western views are pitted against Jamal's wife, Leila, who wants her husband to rule with an iron fist. Barry finds himself torn between the seductive lure of power and the sympathy for his country's freedom fighters.

Silicon Valley, Season 1
Partially inspired by co-creator Mike Judge's experiences as a Silicon Valley engineer in the 1980s, this comedy series follows the misadventures of introverted computer programmer Richard and his brainy friends as they attempt to strike it rich in a high-tech gold rush.

The Thick of It, Seasons 1-4
Chronicles the blunders of the fictitious Department of Social Affairs and Citizenship, a government department barely registering on the national radar. In this Ministry, every announcement is followed by a whirlwind of u-turns, every policy is a scramble and every mishap is met with abuse from the Prime Minister's policy enforcer.

Fore more TV shows, be sure to check out AADL’s lists for HOT TV shows, as well as NEW TV shows.

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