Looking for a great documentary?

Tarnation is the true life story of Jonathan Caouette's childhood with a schizophrenic mother. Made up of snapshots, Super-8, answering machine messages, video diaries, and early short films, this film is unlike anything else I have seen. Visually, this documentary is amazing, especially knowing it was edited with Apple's free program "imovie". If you are looking for a change from traditional cinema, certainly, give Tarnation a look!

Fall Film Fever

Coming to theaters on October 20:
Fast Food Nation: Director Richard Linklater (Waking Life, Dazed and Confused) takes on the controversial 2001 book by author Eric Schlosser. Also, Flags of Our Fathers, directed by Clint Eastwood, written by Paul Haggis (director of last year's Oscar winner, Crash), and adapted from James Bradley's book, tells the story of the six men who raised the flag at The Battle of Iwo Jima.

Coming to theaters on November 17: Bobby, directed by Emilio Estevez, follows the stories of 22 people who were at the Ambassador Hotel when U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated on June 6, 1968.

New 4-star DVDs

Here are four 4-star titles recently purchased by the Library.

Windsor Castle: A Royal Year chronicles a year in the life of the world's oldest working castle. "A must-see for Anglophiles and royal watchers" (Booklist).

John and Abigail Adams is based heavily on the extraordinary correspondence between the second President and his wife. "Combining fine on-location shooting, solid dramatic recreations...this is highly recommended." (Video Librarian).

History of Black Achievement in America uses dramatic recreations, archival footage, stills and artwork to produce "an outstanding eight-part series that brings much-needed balance, highlighting the exemplary contributions of African Americans to U.S. society and culture" (Video Librarian).)

Castro on Film

On Monday, prior to undergoing major surgery, 79-year-old Fidel Castro handed the reins to his brother, Raúl, leading many to wonder if it will soon be Springtime for Cuba? Now seems a good time to look back at the man on film. The Library carries the following DVDs: 2005's Fidel Castro and Fidel Castro: El Comandante. For more flavor, there's 1974's Waiting For Fidel; El Che; and various films detailing the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Animanga Club: Cosplay Prep!

Come to the Downtown library Multipurpose room this Saturday, July 29th, between 2:00 and 4:00 pm, for last minute touches on your cosplay costume. Cosplay expert Darcy from Wizzywig will be available to help with your costume and show us how to make cat collars and cat ears. DDR will be set up and of course, Pocky will be provided. See you there!

The Play Ground

The Play Ground

Rod Steiger's Jud Fry farmhand character from the 1955 movie Oklahoma still haunts The Play Ground. But Curly and Laurey and Aunt Eller sing classic Rogers and Hammerstein as they tell the story of the territory on the verge of statehood. Agnes de Mille, original choreographer, revolutionized musical theatre by creating dance that actually enhanced the plot. Now you can see it all in person. The Dexter Community Players are at the Dexter Center for the Performing Arts on July 27-29. 2200 Parker Rd., Dexter. 426-5060. For those who cannot make it to Dexter, check out a DVD or listen to a CD.
"I ....can't say no."

Film Revolutionary


July 26 is the birthday of film director, Stanley Kubrick. Born in 1928 in New York City, Kubrick began his film career shooting a documentary of a boxer, "The Day of the Fight" for which he made $100. Kubrick's films are known for their brilliant cinematography. More than any other director, most of his films were based on books. Some of his most famous were Dr. Strangelove and 2001: Space Odyssey. His last film before his death in 1999 was Eyes Wide Shut.

WebSpace: The Movies?

An article from Sunday's NY Times, "Hollywood Clicks on the Work of Web Auteurs," discusses the 11-minute online hit, MySpace: The Movie and the type of filmmaking fare the web is likely to spawn in the future. Times contributor Walter Kirn, author of the novel Thumbsucker, which was recently made into a feature film, makes the following comments: "The Net is a self-consciously anti-authoritarian audience. They are spit-ballers, defacers, vandals, skeptics. It's a class without a teacher. The movies that succeed on it will have those properties....The Net is going to unleash a hybrid talent and a hybrid sensibility. What it needs is an Orson Welles, an unclassifiable polymath...."

Jack Warden, 1920-2006

Jack Warden

I first saw Jack Warden, one of my favorite character actors, in the 1971 football tearjerker, Brian's Song. Then his familiar face and gruff voice seemed to show up everywhere--especially in movies with Warren Beatty. He was a strong presence in several other good films, including 1957's Twelve Angry Men, All the President's Men, The Verdict, Being There, and While You Were Sleeping. Warden died yesterday at the age of 85. More on Jack Warden at wikipedia.

New Non-Fiction DVDs

The library has just added some new non-fiction DVDs to our collection. Why we Fight, a film from Sony Pictures directed by Eugene Jarecki, discusses the United States dealings with military engagement. It includes scenes with Dwight D. Eisenhower, John McCain, and Dan Rather. Other new DVDs that have been added to the non-fiction collection include The Gospel of Judas, The Untold Story of Emmett Till, The End of Suburbia, and Eugene O'Neill. Come in and check some out!

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