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Bliptronic 5000

There are currently 2 available

Where To Find It

Call number: Music Tools

Available Copies: Downtown 1st Floor Stuff Shelf

Contents

  • 1 Bliptronic 5000
  • 4 rechargeable AA batteries (installed)

How To Use

Turn the power button to the on position. Press some of the LED buttons and they will light up, press them again and the light goes out. Buttons that are illuminated will play a note. Press the play button and the notes will play from left to right, and start over again if you have the loop knob set to loop. Turn off the power when you are finished to conserve the batteries.

Overview

In the world of the Bliptronic, creating a song revolves around an ever evolving 4-beat pattern. Each row of vertical buttons represents the notes in one octave. Push a button to turn on a note, push the button again to turn off a note. Push multiple buttons in one vertical row to make a chord. The Bliptronic plays whatever you have selected in sequence horizontally across the display. When it reaches the end of the pattern, it repeats. The genius comes as you modify the pattern by turning notes on and off while the pattern is still looping to create evolving electronic melodies. In addition to the grid of glowing LED buttons you'll notice some other controls on the Bliptronic. These allow you to set the tempo (From 60-160 BPM), choose the instrument (From 8 different retro-synth type sounds), adjust the volume and turn looping on or off. A big "play" button at the bottom makes the Bliptronic uh... play. If you hit it again it stops. Yep.

Product description from ThinkGeek

Preview

Community Reviews

simple but neat

It does one simple thing but does it well.

Note it also has trigger in/out jacks that can be used in combination with other stuff in the collection. (E.g. I enjoyed experimenting with hooking this up to the monotribe.)

fun but not life-altering

A fun musical toy but not what I'd call an 'instrument'.

Great for kids

Want to know what a flower of smiley face sounds like?
Draw one and hit the button. comedian Bill Bailey likes to use one of these in his sets - they are tons of fun and simply great for kids as young as three. My class ranged between just pushing all the buttons and trying to draw, but all of them given enough time started experimenting with tone and speed to get the exact sound they were looking for.

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